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Which train returned Pressflo 'empties' to Lewes/Southerham Rugby Cement works?


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14 hours ago, acg5324 said:

 

Thank you so much for these.  I did not realise the company was still sending over trailers into the 1990's.  Corrected a few memories, and it appears the trailers were taken off the ferries by a port authority 'tug'(?), and then picked up by a British haulier.  I remembered the tractor units in the same matching blue, so good to see my false memory put to rest.  And now I know where to post my old lorry photos as well!  Many thanks again, and best wishes to you all.

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Sorry for the late reply, (One) a typical day for me would’ve been (in 1974) I would first of all check the sand boxes one on either side of the engine to see if they needed topping up, then I would clean the whole train with rags and a bucket of diesel, while I was doing this, the driver would be checking the engine oil/water and anything else that needed his attention. Once everything was ship shape the driver would start her up and wait for the air-pressure to build up, once built up we would go about our daily routine.                                                                   (Two) We never filled the Presflo’s up with cement, they were always delivered to us full, the train would always hook up (On the back of the train) two Presflo’s and push both them up the siding besides the weighbridge, the weighbridge operator would put the brakes on both Presflo’s then unshackle them, then empty the front Presflo, once emptied he would with the aid of the brake roll it forward (Then put the brake fully on) then roll the second Presflo in to place for emptying, then once this ones empty he would reengage the couplings. The train would reverse back-up the shunter would attach the couplings to the train take the brakes off and take them to the sidings, we only did this when we had a delivery (So not every day).

(Three) the train could only take two Presflo’s at a time pushing (On the back of the train) them back up to the works… …The train could only pull (On the front of the train) three coal waggons this was because of the short track up near the wash-mill.

(Four) Sorry I don’t know times or who many, no cement was put in vans in my time I’m afraid. I’m sorry for the sketchy details it’s been a long time LoL I hope this helps, this has brought back fond memories…  footnote the diesel train only went one way, it never turned round.                                                  

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On 21/04/2021 at 19:15, Harlyboo807 said:

Sorry for the late reply, (One) a typical day for me would’ve been (in 1974) I would first of all check the sand boxes one on either side of the engine to see if they needed topping up, then I would clean the whole train with rags and a bucket of diesel, while I was doing this, the driver would be checking the engine oil/water and anything else that needed his attention. Once everything was ship shape the driver would start her up and wait for the air-pressure to build up, once built up we would go about our daily routine.                                                                   (Two) We never filled the Presflo’s up with cement, they were always delivered to us full, the train would always hook up (On the back of the train) two Presflo’s and push both them up the siding besides the weighbridge, the weighbridge operator would put the brakes on both Presflo’s then unshackle them, then empty the front Presflo, once emptied he would with the aid of the brake roll it forward (Then put the brake fully on) then roll the second Presflo in to place for emptying, then once this ones empty he would reengage the couplings. The train would reverse back-up the shunter would attach the couplings to the train take the brakes off and take them to the sidings, we only did this when we had a delivery (So not every day).

(Three) the train could only take two Presflo’s at a time pushing (On the back of the train) them back up to the works… …The train could only pull (On the front of the train) three coal waggons this was because of the short track up near the wash-mill.

(Four) Sorry I don’t know times or who many, no cement was put in vans in my time I’m afraid. I’m sorry for the sketchy details it’s been a long time LoL I hope this helps, this has brought back fond memories…  footnote the diesel train only went one way, it never turned round.                                                  

 

Just wanted to say a big 'Thank you' for these reminiscences.  No problem with the time-span - I can not believe it is nearly fifty years ago.  Thank you for the details - it is only from an 'insider' like yourself we could understand how the sidings were run (e.g., the max. no. of wagons).  Much appreciated, and if you remember anything else, please do post again.  Have you been to Tunbridge Wells to see the little loco again?  Hope other parts of RMWeb are of interest to you.  With many best wishes, and thanks again.

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Evening all,

This is a brilliant thread!

I remember hearing about a Newhaven based driver who was shunting the van train and ended up spilling Transits all over the yard! C126 mentioned Motorail flats, there used to be a Newhaven-Stirling service.

As for the excellent track diagrams, I remember seeing a turntable well in Seaford yard, there's a brick wall but it could be seen from the top deck of the bus. This would have been around '84 but it had gone by '87 when I began working in Seaford. The yard has been built over.

I'm going to Seaford tomorrow I'll have a look from the train.

Brilliant thread, 

Steve

 

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

In early years, Seaford had a turntable at the end of the station, used to release locos for running-round trains.

This can be seen in the excellent 4mm scale model by members of the Newhaven & District Model Railway Club in the Seaford Town Museum. I have taken photos but on the proviso that they were not for general publication.

These images can be found on line but the links from them to the museum have been severed it seems.

Loco in Seaford.jpg

Seaford Station (1870).jpg

Edited by phil_sutters
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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, phil_sutters said:

This can be seen in the excellent 4mm scale model by members of the Newhaven & District Model Railway Club in the Seaford Town Museum. I have taken photos but on the proviso that they were not for general publication.

These images can be found on line but the links from them to the museum have been severed it seems.

 

Seaford Station (1870).jpg

Given the neat and fairly detailed drawings of the buildings, the artist seems to have struggled with the new-fangled railway scene. It makes it look as though we had broad gauge track, partially inset in block paving!

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It may indeed have been inset, although broad-gauge does seem a tad unlikely.

 

Stations took a while to settle into the form we know and love, and looking at pictures of very early ones, it is possible to gain the impression that the track-bed in a station was treated  rather like a road/highway, which makes sense at a time when railway carriages were still very much inspired by road-coach design, and had footsteps, later footboards, under the doors. Mind you, Seaford wasn't a "pioneer" station - it opened in the 1860s.

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Posted (edited)

We celebrated Seaford 150 in 2014. I have amended my post to make it obvious that the broad gauge look was just an impression.

Edited by phil_sutters
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I popped down to Lewes last weekend, and got time to toddle out to Southerham between the showers and take some photographs.  To one who has not visited for thirty years, it was a bit of a shock.  Hope they are of interest.

 

PICT2475.JPG.72d683bdec0ea0209ddd2557922a31f9.JPG

 

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Through the above gates:

 

PICT2478.JPG.aab0af51350f9f205282b4277deb94cd.JPG

 

 

Looking down from the above bridge:

 

PICT2481.JPG.5b778a214da6b9234eb25180f4ac730f.JPG

 

Finally, looking down from the A27 bridge:

 

PICT2480.JPG.d0604db70d6a84ff4bef55836d20e679.JPG

 

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