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A very good  recreation of a small SR terminus particularilly like the signal box cameo that privy is a luxury job obviously the union did a good job on the management.On the coal staves I think they should be next to the office as where they are now tends to crowd the area towards the track in front of the coal siding.Hope you dont mind me saying this as the quality of modeling is great.

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Thank you for your kind comments.  Helpful criticism always welcome.  Originally, I was going to put them on the other side of the track.  However, they looked rather uninteresting when viewed from the front of the layout.  Artistic licence won the day, I'm afraid.

 

Terry

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I would agree that the staithes make the location looked 'cramped'.

 

I recall a discussion 'somewhere' to the effect that it was a "modeller's fallacy" to put coal staithes backing against the track, as apparently in many goods yards they were on the far side of the roadway facing towards the siding, IIRC something to do with the distribution function of the coal merchant. Anyway, it might be worth looking at some photos of small goods yards and you might find a valid excuse then to put them against the backscene with the 'interesting' open side facing the viewer.

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4 hours ago, col.stephens said:

telegraph pole near the signal box with the wires disappearing under the bridge,

Wouldn’t it be a tall pole with the wires going over the bridge?

Could be cabled and onto a pole the other side.

I do like your ‘extended’ scenery, works very well.

Paul.

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10 hours ago, RailWest said:

I would agree that the staithes make the location looked 'cramped'.

 

I recall a discussion 'somewhere' to the effect that it was a "modeller's fallacy" to put coal staithes backing against the track, as apparently in many goods yards they were on the far side of the roadway facing towards the siding, IIRC something to do with the distribution function of the coal merchant. Anyway, it might be worth looking at some photos of small goods yards and you might find a valid excuse then to put them against the backscene with the 'interesting' open side facing the viewer.

The mis-location of coal bins (Thank you, Terry, for not calling them staithes!) is a particular bête noire of mine. It's not exactly a fallacy, since there were plenty of such examples, but the position directly alongside the tracks was a lot rarer than most modellers still think. It has to be remembered that a goods yard was usually available for all customers for general use, and if one coal merchant places his bins by the tracks that severely limits the trackside unloading for everyone else, and increases the shunting required to place wagons in suitable positions.  This situation is exacerbated on a model, where the siding space is usually considerably reduced due to space considerations. The usual situation was to have no bins at all, with unloading being carried out from the wagon onto the delivery vehicle, or temporary heaps left on the ground to be collected later that same day. If there were bins, they would often be positioned along the boundary of the yard, leaving space for vehicles to pass. However, as Farleigh is a Central Division Southern layout, the odds are better for you, as trackside coal bins seem to be more permitted in the South East, although more common after nationalisation, as other traffic tailed off, leaving more room for the remaining coal traders.

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Hi Terry

I really like your model. You have really captured the feel of a Southern branch line. 
I also have written about the positioning of coal bins.it seems to me there is no hard and fast rule but on the southern more often than not bins backed onto a siding eg Hawkhurst Westerham Wadhurst and Swanage but At Sherborne ,Seaton for example the bins were on the other side of the service road . As has been said at many stations there were no bins and coal was left in piles in the yard or more often shovelled straight into sacks on the traders lorry
Where bins were placed against the siding they were usually of a height that enabled the door of the coal truck to rest on the top of the bin 

My own view is that at a smaller station I would simply have no bins but a pile of coal or a heap of coal sacks near to or beside the siding

Hope this helps

David

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Following from my last post here is a picture of my North Street layout which may give an idea of what I meant.

North Street is a small rundown Southern halt with two sidings. 
I have no bins but a small coal pile and some sacks awaiting collection

,the coal trucks are simply Parked in one of the two sidings to be unloaded.

 

All the best

David

43306B8A-81CD-4110-80A1-BF5945CA8E66.jpeg

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, 5BarVT said:

Wouldn’t it be a tall pole with the wires going over the bridge?

Could be cabled and onto a pole the other side.

I do like your ‘extended’ scenery, works very well.

Paul.

Hello Paul.  Thank you for your kind comments.  As I understand it, the telegraph wires could go over the bridge with the always possible danger of a high vehicle bringing them down.  This happens occasionally on the country lane on which I live, when HGV drivers trust their satnavs, rather than their own eyes and common sense!  In our case, the idiots usually bring down the power cables too.  The alternative is for the wires to run from the pole to insulators fixed to the side of the arch.  I think the latter solution would look better as with the former, the wires would stop dead at the backscene.  Once under the arch, they are out of sight.

 

Hello Nick and David.  Thank you both for your kind and very interesting comments and I shall certainly give them much thought before deciding on how to proceed.  This topic is becoming very interesting with endless possibilities.  It even raises the possibility of having removable heaps of coal to be placed or removed in different parts of the yard as the circumstances dictate.  Used in conjunction with removable coal wagon loads, it could make for very interesting operation. (Sorry, that's three times I have used the word 'interesting' in this paragraph.  And now it's four!)

 

Thanks once again all.

 

Terry

 

P.S. Lovely layout David.

Edited by col.stephens
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Terry

Further to my postsyesterday, if you have access to Alan Poslethwaite’s book ‘the best of Southern steam the final decade’ there are some excellent pictures of rural stations.

One shot is a lovely panorama of Brasted showing the goods yard including piles of coal,a grounded van acting as an office .

There is also a lovely panoramic shot of Edenbridge Town showing the coal bins up against a siding . There is even a set of points alongside the bins , something I feel sure would be frowned on if it appeared on a model railway. 
I look forward to watching your progress 

Regards

David

 

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Thanks for the info David.  I don't have that particular book but my club has an extensive library and we are being allowed back in soon. I have been experimenting with 'portable coal heaps', of which more soon.

Regards,

Terry

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Coal heaps.  Take a small piece of mount board and cut to shape for the base. Glue some small balls of screwed up newspaper to the base.  Cover in kitchen roll and soak with the 50/50 pva/water mix used for ballasting the track.  Allow to dry and paint with black acrylic paint.  When dry, coat with pva and sprinkle coal thereon.  When dry, cut a hole in the base and remove some of the paper.  Glue in a steel nut so that it is just below the tissue.  If you are clever and forward thinking, you will cut the hole in the base at the beginning of the process.  I am not clever or forward thinking!
My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you...coal heaps...

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A little bit of detail added to the rear of the signal box.  A ladder to be used by the S&T department when climbing the nearby (yet to be added) telegraph pole.

20200829_091715.jpg.af4eb80523a127bb0057d6f274d5b6c3.jpg

 

Terry

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Too young to remember that far back.  When I was with a dual lineman (signalling and telegraph) they were motorised and took the ladder with them.  My feeling is that prior to that they would just have used climbing irons. Anyone know different?

Paul.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Some recent developments on Farleigh.  Fencing has been fixed along the rear of the yard and a gate has been installed.

20200907_113523.jpg.e7150df5a9c6411c2fe221065e5ab499.jpg

I decided to install the signal cables, represented by 0.25mm nylon thread, which is almost invisible to the naked eye.  The excellent pulleys are 3D printed products available from here:

https://3dprintingcorner.co.uk/

There are two signal cables, one leading to the starter signal and the other disappearing under the bridge to an imaginary home signal.  The foot crossing had to be re-modelled to give clearance to the cables.

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20200914_201613.jpg.6211eb3124e9a7406febed941e0fb11c.jpg

20200914_210414.jpg.ed0efd807f1ceaa138a5d274289d414d.jpg

Thoughts now turning to telegraph poles, telegraph wires and point rodding.

Terry

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7 minutes ago, col.stephens said:

Some recent developments on Farleigh.  Fencing has been fixed along the rear of the yard and a gate has been installed.

20200907_113523.jpg.e7150df5a9c6411c2fe221065e5ab499.jpg

 


Given the dimensions of the layout, that space looks massive!  The one thing country termini tended to have was space, so it’s good to see some here (the other photos are also great too, of course).

Edited by Keith Addenbrooke
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  • 1 month later...

Having been putting off all thoughts of painting the backscene, I finally decided 'to take the bull by the horns' and make a start.  Some months ago I bought online a fifteen feet roll of canvas from an art shop, for the princely sum of £20.  I estimated that I would need approximately nine feet so this was cut from the roll and nailed to a wall inside the shed.  A pencil line was drawn along the canvas at the required height to match the height of the rear scenic boards.  I armed myself with various cheap tubes of acrylic paint and made a very thin wash of cerulean blue.  I quickly applied the wash to the canvas using a household paint brush.  As the acrylic paint began to dry I wondered if it was possible to use a similar technique to that used in watercolour painting to depict clouds.  I screwed-up a ball of kitchen roll and dabbed at the blue paint and was pleased to find that the technique also worked with acrylics.  The kitchen roll removed the paint to reveal the white canvas beneath.  It is possible to make quite pleasing clouds by this method.  I touched in some runny mauve paint at the bottom of each cloud on the right side, the sun being imagined to be on the left.  A small dab of cadmium yellow was applied to the top left side to represent the sunlight bouncing off the tops of each cloud.  Unfortunately, the photos taken under the shed lights look rather drab and do not give a true reflection of the actual colour.  However, if you look closely it is possible to make out the cloud formation.

1730229615_20201009_171802(2).jpg.97c3c9e6526f8077976130882f6a5810.jpg

 

As the layout is set in south-east England, I wanted gently rolling hills in the distance.  I walked down the length of the canvas with a 2H pencil to draw the wavy horizon line.  Next, I applied a wash of sap green to the land mass from the horizon to the lower edge of the canvas.  The lower 2cm will be hidden behind the baseboard frame.  When dry, I mixed up a lighter green using sap green and titanium white.  This was applied to the horizon line to a depth of about two inches. This was all very experimental at this stage. I was basically hoping that all would come good in the end!  I hasten to add that I have no experience of painting scenes in acrylics and have only dabbled in watercolours, with no great success.  Needless to say, John Constable's reputation as a leading exponent of painting rural scenes is not under any threat by yours truly!

20201023_165235.jpg.360a93c0f3722b3337282b8d6d8633ad.jpg

 

 

Emboldened by my success so far, out came the pencil again and the field boundaries were quickly sketched, with smaller fields near the horizon and getting larger towards the bottom of the canvas. 

20201025_125539.jpg.1db74bb3c63c2816f38cd9517dee210c.jpg

 

At this stage I decided to try to eradicate the hard line between the two greens and painted another coat of green, mixed to resemble the static grass used on the layout, over the lower part of the canvas.  I then used a stiff artist's brush (of the cheap ten brushes for £2 variety), and used water to scrub away in an effort to blend the two colours.  Very forgiving stuff this canvas.  I then mixed sap green with a very tiny amount of black and, using a small flat artist's brush, started to paint over the pencil lines to represent the field hedgerows, the lines getting thinner as they receded away to the horizon.  Whilst still damp, I worried the painted hedgerows with a damp stiff brush to remove some of the paint, in an effort to reduce their intensity.  Some of the fields were given a thin wash of yellow ochre to represent cereal crops. 

20201115_173718.jpg.a058a3a394c3f59636ab4883e60221a4.jpg

 

Terry

 

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I decided to move things along by adding some trees to the landscape and to enhance the hedgerows.  All achieved by dabbing a sap green/black mix onto the canvas with a small hog's hair brush. Plenty of work of this nature left to do so I probably won't be updating this thread for a short while.  Here is where we are at present... (please excuse the horizontal lines caused by the shed lighting)...

20201115_182614.jpg.c1ca72d5a5b86013659fdf502620b138.jpg

 

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Thanks for reading about my humble efforts... more soon.

 

Terry

 

P.S.  I must record here that I have derived much inspiration from the book 'Creating a Backscene' by Paul Bambrick and John Ellis-Cockell.  Unfortunately, I obtained this marvellous book too late to incorporate a 3D backscene as expounded by Paul, but have found the photos and text inspiring in the production of my 2D backscene.

Edited by col.stephens
Additional text added.
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  • 2 weeks later...

Still painting my way along the 9' long backscene. Field boundaries mostly painted.  Gradually adding more hedges and trees.  I had previously fitted a single strip of 'warm white' LEDs behind the pelmet but became aware that the lighting was a little on the dim side.   I recently bought another strip of 'cool white' LEDs for under £10 on the 'bay.  These are much brighter so, in order not to completely swamp the layout in bright light, I stuck these above the original LEDs in small clusters along the length of the layout.  It was simplicity itself to run connecting wires from the original LED strip to the new clusters.

Edited by col.stephens
Correct spelling.
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