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Posted (edited)

Having backfilled our rearmost wall, attention is now turned towards the shed electrics. For this, the electric supply will be 16mm armoured cable set into the trench. I did intend to start today, but it's not too good weather-wise. However, the delivery has arrived for the cable, and an additional 4-way consumer unit. 

 

Today's job is to investigate some armoured telephone cable. The intention is to hard wire a quality burglar alarm or telephone line into the house.

 

Keep safe, everyone,

 

Ian.

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Edited by tomparryharry
Poor grammar, sorry!
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An alarm for quality burglars, eh, Ian.  You lives in a propa posh area, you does...

 

Glad to see some progress; you must be pleased and cheering up a bit.  Soon have the layout running...

 

Stay safe.

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Posted (edited)

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Edited by tomparryharry
Rubbish post:- Better tomorrow!

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Posted (edited)

Hello Folks, I hope you're all doing OK. 

 

The trench electrics did indeed proceed, and completed. There's not much to see in all honesty, unless you are wont to view into a badly-dug trench... Still, today's work marks a quite important milestone. The ground works are now completed.  No more digging down; now, it's building up

 

Monday next will (should) start the next 'noisy' bit,as the beams get trimmed to size and installed. Once there, they will get a Damp Proof Course, as Dave Bacon of this parish has noted.  

 

My photos are, as usual, substandard, but hopefully you'll see where it's going. 

 

Please keep safe, everybody, and enjoy the weather. 

 

Ian.

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Edited by tomparryharry
Text tidy-up
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Just looking at it’s making me tired, or to be more precise, making me more tired.  I don’t mean in the boring sense, just the thought of all that physical effort, puts my session of sawing wood for the fire basket this avo to shame! 

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3 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Just looking at it’s making me tired, or to be more precise, making me more tired.  I don’t mean in the boring sense, just the thought of all that physical effort, puts my session of sawing wood for the fire basket this avo to shame! 

 

It's mild spasms of euphoria. We've touched this subject on the 'Modelling Mojo' thread a while ago. Back then, the prospect of getting going was the problem. Now, it's a lot easier. Hopefully, a good week in prospect.

 

Take care, and stay safe. 

 

Ian.

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Posted (edited)

Ho hum, rain stopped play.

 

These photos are of the 'spine' of the shed. They are inverted, to allow the joist hangers to be affixed to the beams, and then righted. I'm awaiting some neoprene rubber pads, via 'bay. These will then provide a DPC, and allow me to strap down the beams. 

 

I had hope to show hundreds of photos, but there we are, nothing really doing. Sods Law dictates that as I'm typing this the Sun is coming out. (Looks out of window)... Bu66er!

 

Keep safe, everybody,

Ian.

 

Late news! I've just found out that our local timber importer has just resumed trading. Needless to say, I'll be banging on their door  first thing tomorrow. Progress at last!

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Edited by tomparryharry
Late news!
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Today saw the start (about bl**dy time)  of putting up the joist beams.  We are setting them out at 16", or 400mm. Because of the original length of the beams, we are losing about 500mm with every cut, so this is ideal for noggins, etc. Tomorrow we will (should) do the hypotenuse, to get it all square. Despite the progress, I can't start with the floor boarding, as we still await the rubber pads to damp proof the block walls and piers. Then, it's a final packing & levelling of the base structure. 

 

I did think I could order up some extra 225x75 CLS, to cover my material shortfall, but it was not to be.  Our local importer is flat out keeping up with the backlog of the shutdown and I'm waaay down the list. "Try Thursday", he said.... However, I originally set out the project on the basis of the 'free' joists, so I might utilise  slightly smaller 225x 50mm joists, which are both easier & cheaper to procure. We shall see. 

 

Some of my usual substandard photos, just to see where we're going.

 

I hope you enjoy the weekend, and stay safe.

 

Ian. 

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50mm is fine on that span (they'd do about 4M+ at 400 Centres) 

 

I'd only worry if you were shortlisted for "My 600lb life" in which case you could just reduce the centres and throw another couple in.

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Hello Dave, thanks for the notes. 

 

I'm a bit annoyed with myself that I didn't have enough joist in stock to completely cover the job. I assumed that a quick trip to the importer would address the shortfall.  The dimension of 200x50 was-is the dimension I used to rebuild the suspended floor in our hallway at home, which has a span of 2.4 metres / 8 '.  The much larger 225x75 is being used, because it's free.  The 16"/400mm layout is, as you know, standard building dimensions, so anyone coming behind me will probably understand what I've done.   

 

"600lb life?"  It reminds me of the 1970's song by Telly Savalas:- " Hey you! Don't you call me fatty! I'm an expert in Karate!" 

 

Cheers,

Ian

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A couple of photos to hopefully show some progress. With it being Bank Holiday & VE75, I don't want to disturb the neighbours, so on stop until Tuesday next. However, Saturday saw most of the Rearward noggins go in. There are only the forward ones, and then I hope to get the Damp proof in, and a final packing & levelling. A bit of joist trimming is required, however. 

 

Usual poor quality photos, just to see where it's going. 

 

Have a great Bank Holiday, and stay safe.

 

Ian.

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Looking good.  Looking at it reminded me of being with Dad in Nagasaki 1976.

 

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Just how big is the shed?

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2 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

Looking good.  Looking at it reminded me of being with Dad in Nagasaki 1976.

 

IMG_0030.jpg.da6e6257b5cc865ff1ea80c9f1276d50.jpg

Just how big is the shed?

 

You lose the scale perspective, and then you look at the flights of stairs going up the bow.... I assume that the large 'box' at the end is what will become the engine room?

 

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3 hours ago, tomparryharry said:

I assume that the large 'box' at the end is what will become the engine room?

Sure is. For info this is what was being built.

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250,000Tons and as a 13 year old being given the run of the ship on sea trials was so much fun!

I know this is off topic but at the 'launch' ceremony the handover to BP was signed by this fella.

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He turned up later as the first head of Railtrack (Bob Horton)....

 

Ok back on topic........looking good :good_mini:

 

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After a sojourn, I'm back at the shed project. The flooring boards have been in storage since 1989, so they're finally seeing the light of day. Once down, they will need a tidy up at the ends, and a good dose of creosote. Creosote is nasty stuff, and not to be used lightly. In this case, it'll create a sub-floor, with possibly a caberwood floor on top of that, but we'll see how we go. Being a Bank Holiday weekend, there won't be much work in deference to my near neighbours. Still, it's only 1 day, and the sun is shining.....

 

Mrs Smith has taken these snaps on my behalf, because my photo skills are rubbish. Next week will find me ordering some wood for the roof trusses.

 

Have a good Whistun everybody, and keep safe.

Ian.

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25 minutes ago, tomparryharry said:

The flooring boards have been in storage since 1989

 

I'm glad I'm not the only one....My headstone will say "That'll come in handy someday"

 

If you don't like Creosote any wood stains like Sadolin classic will do a good job, I tend to keep all the part tins for jobs like that......unless you've had the creosote in store since 1973..:D

 

Looking good. :good_mini:

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41 minutes ago, chris p bacon said:

 

I'm glad I'm not the only one....My headstone will say "That'll come in handy someday"

 

Yep, that's me.

41 minutes ago, chris p bacon said:

 

If you don't like Creosote any wood stains like Sadolin classic will do a good job, I tend to keep all the part tins for jobs like that......unless you've had the creosote in store since 1973..:D

 

Looking good. :good_mini:

 

Thanks Dave. I took on Poly Bears suggestion, and incorporated a trapdoor aperture. I've nearly fallen through the bl**dy thing twice already. Grrrr. If I can't find any 'extra' creosote, I'll improvise by using some roofing sealant, and mixing it at 50/50 with turps substitute. I've got some of that knocking about since 1990.....

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7 hours ago, tomparryharry said:

After a sojourn, I'm back at the shed project. The flooring boards have been in storage since 1989, so they're finally seeing the light of day. Once down, they will need a tidy up at the ends, and a good dose of creosote. Creosote is nasty stuff, and not to be used lightly.

 

Creosote is sadly no longer available to us lesser mortals :(; it is however available to those "in the trade" such as Farmers, Landscape Gardeners etc. (but it looks like it'll come in 25L drums or larger).  I guess the professionals are immune to whatever it is the EEC don't like about the stuff.  Personally I like the stuff as it does exactly what it says on the tin, which is more than can be said about it's fluffy replacement, Creocote.

Another dodge I've heard of is mixing used engine oil with Paraffin and using that instead.  But used engine oil is apparently nasty too, so I mustn't suggest it...

 

6 hours ago, tomparryharry said:

 

Thanks Dave. I took on Poly Bears suggestion, and incorporated a trapdoor aperture. I've nearly fallen through the bl**dy thing twice already.

 

Ooops...

 

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To avoid any visits from the 'Ministry', I'm not at liberty to divulge any information......

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Back in the late nineties, I lived for a while in a flat on the top floor of a 3- storey house in Pontcanna, Cardiff; brilliant location, sh*t flat, where the woman downstairs used to get addicted to all manner of strange things, including creosote for about 6 months.  She’d fill a washing up bowl of it and sniff it. 
 

I have to say she never went rotten in the rain...

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It's a bit late now, but standing timbers end-on into a bucket of creosote or similar for several hours is a really good scheme - you'll be amazed at just how much the timber will hoover up into the end grain.  I've just been doing it with some spirit based Timber Preservative and a Railway Sleeper; I found the preservative in my shed and a quick search shows it's no longer available.  That probably means it's been banned by Brussels for being good stuff....

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14 minutes ago, polybear said:

That probably means it's been banned by Brussels for being good stuff....

 

A Chaser ?

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8 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

 

A Chaser ?

 

You've lost me....:unknw_mini:

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When I built my shed, 63ft long,  that structural wood that wasn't already coated in preservative, was put into a big drainpipe full of creosote for at least a couple of days before use. The creosote topped up once the pipe was filled with wood.  I tried to cut to size wood before soaking,  this was not always possible,  so they just had to make do with a dip on the cut ends.  I was going to the shed all week after work swapping the wood over in the pipes doing the construction at weekends. 

 

  Inside cladding was painted with wood worm killer. As each plank was done, it was stored on top of the previous plank meaning drips ran into other planks,  and the planks stayed wetter longer giving a better chance to soak in.  ( the garden is an old orchard,  lots of woodworm) . The planks being used the following week. 

 

The shed has block foundations with a damp proof course before a 4x4 wooden ring beam, there is a there is also a total damp proof sheet to stop dampness rising through the wooden floor. A full damp proof membrane, I've done on all my sheds.

 

One piece of advice I give to those with a plain shed rather than a mini building is to double glaze the windows,  a piece of perspex,  screwed over the standard window makes a huge difference to heat loss. 

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I'm not too far away from you, in terms of construction.  The joist beams are all damp proofed,  living on a retaining wall. The object here is to use the existing planks to provide a sub-floor, and to put a Caberdeck floor in, once the exterior is sealed off. The creosote in this instance is a sealed in preservative.

 

What I should say, is that nearly everything on this project (thus far) is free to use. The materials have been drawn 'from stock' as & when required. If I were to build a different shed, I would have gone down a different path (pardon the pun) . Here, topography dictated the situation.  

 

This weekend should see the making of jigs to construct the roof trusses. The roof angle is 22.5 degrees, or as our American cousins would say, a 6-12 pitch. Over a 12' span roof, this roughly equates to a 8' distance from apex to eaves. I'm keeping the 16" centre for the trusses, and the walls, for which I haven't started yet. These will (should) marry up with the floor joists, which went down a few weeks ago. Having the floor down at this stage is the bonus for me; there is an uninterrupted square area here of 264 feet; just right for some hopefully accurate jig work. I'll try to get some photos up ASAP. 

 

Have a great weekend folks, and keep safe,

Ian.

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