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3 hours ago, polybear said:

 

You've lost me....:unknw_mini:

 

I can't remember where I heard it or what I saw it in, but there was a sketch about meths and other nasty liquids that a character was bemoaning the loss of, when asked why he wanted them he said they made a good chaser after a beer....

 

Think whisky chaser....or in the case of Trump, Bleach..........

 

I can get a bit obscure sometimes, now wonder they all stare at me at work :rolleyes:

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You might be getting them confused with the highway robber

 

Dick Turpentine....

 

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8 hours ago, TheQ said:

When I built my shed, 63ft long,  that structural wood that wasn't already coated in preservative, was put into a big drainpipe full of creosote for at least a couple of days before use. The creosote topped up once the pipe was filled with wood.  I tried to cut to size wood before soaking,  this was not always possible,  so they just had to make do with a dip on the cut ends.  I was going to the shed all week after work swapping the wood over in the pipes doing the construction at weekends. 

 

  Inside cladding was painted with wood worm killer. As each plank was done, it was stored on top of the previous plank meaning drips ran into other planks,  and the planks stayed wetter longer giving a better chance to soak in.  ( the garden is an old orchard,  lots of woodworm) . The planks being used the following week. 

 

The shed has block foundations with a damp proof course before a 4x4 wooden ring beam, there is a there is also a total damp proof sheet to stop dampness rising through the wooden floor. A full damp proof membrane, I've done on all my sheds.

 

One piece of advice I give to those with a plain shed rather than a mini building is to double glaze the windows,  a piece of perspex,  screwed over the standard window makes a huge difference to heat loss. 

 

Thanks Q. Here, I've got a bit of a cellar. It's not very deep, only 1,200mm, but enough room to put in some insulation underneath should it needs it. Because we have the retaining wall, I'm thinking about some degree of air conditioning, specific to the probable damp we might encounter. I haven't tanked the wall, as I couldn't guarantee the quality of the sealing. so it's going to be a bit  of 'wait & see'. I I know this can be done, but I've no experience of it. Therefore a serious dose of 'looking at' beckons. In addition, some sort of 'heat overload' protection. In this sort of weather, I'll guess it'll get blistering in there, and I'm thinking about extra fans to come into play when we exceed say, 17 degrees C. Once again, something I've not done, but I'm blessed warm whilst just typing this. One of my clients has a converted church on the Isle of Wight. Being a resourceful person, he has made copies of the stained glass windows on the south side of the building.  At the base, he has made a gap to allow air to enter betwixt both outer & inner glass, with some discreet holes at the top, to allow the warm air in. Likewise, one of the Green  technology hubs over there have done simple things, like affixing sheets of Perspex with air-gaps at the bottom, and exit holes at or near the soffit. Simple stuff, but properly used, it'll reduce the heating bills. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Today's work has centred around making some mitre box jigs for the rafters & trusses. I used to have a compound mitre saw, but Lord knows where it is. I'm loath to purchase another, especially when I'm only doing 'one' job. However, the material requirement is for 17 trusses, or 34 'common' rafters. so jigs are pretty crucial in obtaining accurate work, in a repetitive job. 

 

The first photo is of the Apex jig. This allows the rafter parts  to come together in a vertical line. The 2 smaller parts are spacing blocks, which can be set down to whatever depth the timber will be. 

The second photo is a custom- made mitre box, also set out at 22.5 degrees. There will be a 3rd set, which help set out the base chord of the truss.  

IMAG1368[1].jpg

IMAG1369[1].jpg

Edited by tomparryharry
Text clarification & clean -up.
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I’m impressed, bwtti bach!   

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The local council dump is a good source for cheap/free double glazed units, also freegle/freecycle and ebay.

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1 hour ago, polybear said:

The local council dump is a good source for cheap/free double glazed units, also freegle/freecycle and ebay.

 

Our local dump is off-limits at the mo', but there are a couple of double glazing firms around Newport. I haven't asked anyone yet, I sure I will......

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Be careful just taking from a recycling centre. Ask the staff and be prepared to hear "no".

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2 hours ago, Buhar said:

Be careful just taking from a recycling centre. Ask the staff and be prepared to hear "no".

 

Oh no, nothing like that! Our travels take me past a couple of Double glazing factories, adjacent to what was Newport (Pill) locomotive shed, and the area which was once Maesglas. (The largest collection of Great Western brakevans in South Wales).  At the moment, I'm trying to re-cycle stuff, not accumulate it!

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In anticipation of a delivery this coming week, We've had some time to make templates, which relate to the plywood gussets. As before, the material requirement is for 17 trusses, with a 12' span, and a height of 3' from apex to eaves. Naturally, each & every one has to identical to its brother, so jigs & templates are a pre-requisite. The photo below shows the templates, all designed to be used in a plywood sheet, but 2' wide (2 runs out of an 8x4' sheet).

 

There is a bit of design work still to do. This relates to the trusses. The bottom chord of the truss will rest on the top plates of the shed walls. But! Do we just affix the chord to the top plate, or do we make an addition to the bottom gusset, to incorporate a retainer to keep the trusses in line?  This exterior 'hanger would ideally form a place to locate a soffit. 

 

Still, here we are. Tomorrow sees the purchase of some 12mm hardwood ply. This 'should' speed up the truss making.   

 

Have a great week folks, and stay safe.

 

Ian.

IMAG1373[1].jpg

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I use my ready reckoner, I've just got to remember which bevel is set for which cut.......

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5 minutes ago, chris p bacon said:

I use my ready reckoner, I've just got to remember which bevel is set for which cut.......

 

Yes, that would be me as well. As I said, I can't find my mitre saw. In this case, probably not a bad thing. I've already found a modification which won't impinge on the material, and less wastage as well. 

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If you tear out the pages you don't need, they're really handy for packing the bad cuts on the plate..:D

 

When I was workshop bound I used to make templates and jigs for everything that needed doing 3 times or more, the boss/owner came in one saturday and luckily I was there, as if not half of them would have gone for firewood even though they had 'keep' written all over them.

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Storyboard of the construction of my workshop 5 years ago:

Shed.jpg.bb0dd99def00859294908a64f2c81d41.jpg

 

I designed it and built it all except for the concrete base and the fibreglass roof covering.

 

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6 hours ago, Harlequin said:

Storyboard of the construction of my workshop 5 years ago:

Shed.jpg.bb0dd99def00859294908a64f2c81d41.jpg

 

I designed it and built it all except for the concrete base and the fibreglass roof covering.

 

 

I do like that colour scheme, Phil. The exterior has a panel signal box look about it.

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10 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

If you tear out the pages you don't need, they're really handy for packing the bad cuts on the plate..:D

 

When I was workshop bound I used to make templates and jigs for everything that needed doing 3 times or more, the boss/owner came in one saturday and luckily I was there, as if not half of them would have gone for firewood even though they had 'keep' written all over them.

 

Ah! I use the 'rule of 2' as well! Not having a specific tool can be a real pain in the bum. Second time around means going tooled up. 

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It's brain picking time!

 

Seeing Phil's storyboard about his shed, and I noted the insulation phase. Which, or what, insulation is a good recommendation? I 'think' your photo shows wool, but I can't be sure.  Any insight, as usual, will be greatly received.

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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7 minutes ago, tomparryharry said:

It's brain picking time!

 

Seeing Phil's storyboard about his shed, and I noted the insulation phase. Which, or what, insulation is a good recommendation? I 'think' your photo shows wool, but I can't be sure.  Any insight, as usual, will be greatly received.

 

Cheers,

Ian.

Hi Ian,

 

I used Rockwool in the wall panels. Cheaper than wool, medium eco-friendly (not petro-chemical). and breathable.

 

The roof was insulated with rigid foam partly because I had a lot left over from work on my house but also, importantly, to make a "warm roof" structure to avoid condensation problems.

 

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If you're thinking of wool (or spun) then you ideally need 100mm+ in the walls. It does depend on the external and internal cladding as that can add to the U value. For the ceiling I would use Celotex (or similar) and again use at least 100mm and pack any spare wool over the top.

 

The conversion I have just finished was all Celotex (we couldn't meet the U value with any other product/type) It was 80mm+ in the walls (with 9" brickwork) and 100mm between the rafters and continuous 50mm across the bottom (room side) then counter battened for an air space.  Finish was skimmed plasterboard.

 

I sense some skip diving in the Newport area...

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1 minute ago, chris p bacon said:

If you're thinking of wool (or spun) then you ideally need 100mm+ in the walls. It does depend on the external and internal cladding as that can add to the U value. For the ceiling I would use Celotex (or similar) and again use at least 100mm and pack any spare wool over the top.

 

The conversion I have just finished was all Celotex (we couldn't meet the U value with any other product/type) It was 80mm+ in the walls (with 9" brickwork) and 100mm between the rafters and continuous 50mm across the bottom (room side) then counter battened for an air space.  Finish was skimmed plasterboard.

 

I sense some skip diving in the Newport area...

 

Thanks gents. Dave:- No, I'm not going skip diving! I know full well that there will be some wall insulation, so I was thinking  a bit further along the project. The material arriving this week is specifically for the trusses and walls. On that basis, I've got a fortnight's work to build these, and then get the skeleton up. 

 

The centres for both truss & stud walls are-should be 16". There will be a loft space of sorts, although not very high on this pitch, which is 36" maximum. More likely, about 20".  I did indeed consider Phil's approach for the  flat roof, but where we are, a flat roof is an open invitation to allow ne'er-do-wells easy access to the garden. A bit of a non-starter, unfortunately. Most likely will be an OSB roof, with profile steel  above. Ceiling joist would be 10mm infill of Rockwool, held up by 8-9mm OSB. I think that's about where it's heading. 

 

Late news! Just had a message that the wood is arriving tomorrow. Yippee!

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1 hour ago, tomparryharry said:

Ceiling joist would be 10mm infill of Rockwool, held up by 8-9mm OSB.

 

The more you can get in the roof the better*. If you're going for a steel roof it can get hot in the summer so you want to keep that heat out as well as in, in the winter.

 

* IIRC the current spec is 340mm in roof voids.

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In my previous post, I made mention of 10mm Rockwool;  oops! What I should have typed is 175mm depth, or 7", as per the depth of the joists. With that, and the 5" rafter, means I can achieve your target of 340mm.  The one thing I'm not too sure about is the air gap, which is going to be a 'Tricky Dicky', due to the shallow pitch of the roof. Still, early days at the moment. 

 

Enjoy the weather folks, and stay safe. More importantly, keep hydrated!

 

Ian.

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The normal air circulation gap is 50mm with PIR insulation. With Rockwool which doesn't have a solid surface you could probably get away with a little less.

Alan 

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On 02/06/2020 at 07:46, tomparryharry said:

In my previous post, I made mention of 10mm Rockwool;  oops! What I should have typed is 175mm depth, or 7", as per the depth of the joists. With that, and the 5" rafter, means I can achieve your target of 340mm.  The one thing I'm not too sure about is the air gap, which is going to be a 'Tricky Dicky', due to the shallow pitch of the roof. Still, early days at the moment. 

 

Enjoy the weather folks, and stay safe. More importantly, keep hydrated!

 

Ian.

What am I missing here, Ian?  175+125=300 which means you're 40mm short of the 340mm target and 90mm short if you add in the 50mm air gap.

 

There's no reason you can't have layers of different materials e.g. Rockwool above PIR.  A rule of thumb is 50mm of PIR = 100mm Rockwool.  You could also fix a thin layer of PIR to the underside of the ceiling before lining it with the OSB.  It would still be easy to screw through it to fix the OSB to the joists, you just need slightly longer screws.

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On 30/05/2020 at 20:18, tomparryharry said:

 

Oh no, nothing like that! Our travels take me past a couple of Double glazing factories, adjacent to what was Newport (Pill) locomotive shed, and the area which was once Maesglas. (The largest collection of Great Western brakevans in South Wales).  At the moment, I'm trying to re-cycle stuff, not accumulate it!

Don't you think an AA23 Toad would have made a magnificent workshop?

 

It would also have a nice sitting out area when you needed a break and a drink.

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