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We've now turned our attention to the truss installation. The walls have been screw-bolted down, and we're now starting to get the trusses into place. Although I jig-built the trusses, they normally take a little bit of fettling to get them to sit in without recourse to loud swear words, short tempers, or bodgery. So far, so good...... There will be a bit of sub-assembly going on now, to create a set  of pockets to accommodate a truss, as it gets installed. Then, a bit of cross-bracing to hold them on station, while we get them vertical, and fix them in. 

 

Some more photos, and viewing the cross bracing. Next week, hopefully, the first part of the roof will be going on. 

 

Cheers,

Ian.

 

PS. Please excuse the wonky images. No, it's not subsiding.....

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Looking good :good_mini:

 

Hopefully starting mine next month.

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Now you're showing off...:D

 

Looking really good. Give it a couple of weeks and you could get an estate agent in...I know cos I sold a 'Studio flat' last year which was on 27m2, I used the proceeeds to buy a 400m2 set of barns in the Borders!

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1 hour ago, chris p bacon said:

Now you're showing off...:D

 

Looking really good. Give it a couple of weeks and you could get an estate agent in...I know cos I sold a 'Studio flat' last year which was on 27m2, I used the proceeeds to buy a 400m2 set of barns in the Borders!

 

A bit smaller here, Dave, 21.6m  square.  Just enough space to put a layout up. Tonight's entertainment will be investigating some wall insulation.

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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Thank you. Current work centres around putting the trusses up, and the associated cross braces. The cross braces are very much bespoke, being marked out and cut to size. I'll try to get some photos up today.

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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The last couple of days have been excellent weather, work wise. I've managed to make some sub-assembly work, which entails making some  noggins to accept the roof trusses, These are spaced to to fairly accurately 'plant' the truss, as they come into position. The space lines up with an 5x2 upright at each junction. The sectional thickness of a completed truss is 70mm, so I made up a spacer block at 72mm, to create the gap. I'm very pleased to report that it works a treat, with enough 'wiggle' to get everything vertical before they get bolted down. 

 

Due to an oversight, 2 of the trusses have gone in wrong, by about 25mm at the wall plate. I've left out the last truss, while I square up the spacing measurements. It 'should'be 16" on the centre  for uprights, so a little bit of adjustment beckons. 

 

Some more poor quality photos, but  hopefully you can still make out where it's going. 

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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Photos from indoors, sort of, excellent progress Ian, you'll be up and running before xmas.  Hopefully this xmas...

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Cheers, old chap. I'm acutely aware that I'm on an converging timeline. Days will start to get shorter in the next 4-6 weeks, so I want to get ahead whilst I can. Today & Friday should see the remedial truss-work completed, and finally braced up. 

 

Christmas? We'll see....

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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Well get on wiv it, then!  Meanwhile I’m giving you moral support by sitting on a bench outside the back of the St David’s in the cool shade and gentle breeze getting to grips with a fine pint of John Smith’s, from the Trader’s Tavern, which you might know better by it’s old name, the Panorama. 
 

Good word for a Cardiff accent, that.  I’ll finish my taramassalaaata, then go fra pint in the Panerraaaama, no draaama...

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Yes,  I've forgotten what beer tastes like. Anyways, I'm off the pop for the foreseeable future. Next years work is already pencilled in, with a garage to rebuild...

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Posted (edited)

The roof  trusses were finally positioned today. They now require some cross-bracing to keep them all together. The remedial work on the spaces has taken place, and it now looks tidy. I could have gone a bit further, but it's blessed hot today. Once cross braced, we'll start the roof sarking. These  are 8x1" gravelboards, used longitudinally.  My choice of material is dictated by ease of use, span of the boards (4.8 metres), relative cheapness, and, they're treated. Eaves to apex is 12 courses in this instance, and once closed up, they should result in a very strong covering. On top of that, goes a box-profile cladding, which will-should be fitted straight after the sarking is done.

 

This week's top tip: Don't run your circular saw through your ancient Workmate.

 

Some more dodgy photos. Oooh-err, missus.....

 

Have a great weekend, folks.

Ian.

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Edited by tomparryharry
Forgot the blessed photos.
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That's pretty hefty sarking.  With a 400mm gap you could probably use 19mm quite comfortably.  But I'm guessing you have a "source" and a competitive price. Don't forget the "penny gap" between the boards to allow for movement (2p in today's money), are you using builder's paper or some other membrane?

 

Alan

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Hello Alan,

 

The use of gravel boards allows me to stand on the roof, If I need to. I've very deliberately over-engineered the job, in case I need to sub-contract any of the work. The last thing I need is someone to tell me it's not up to standard, and try to talk me into paying out extra for what will be a substandard or flimsy job. The project thus far allows me to get in as much insulation as it can handle, with the idea of  a stable range of temperature and Humidity very firmly uppermost. The last lot of boards were a recovered asset, so this is more of the same. 

 

Thank you for the tip  on gapping. I would have used something similar, but the 2p trick seems sound. Once the roof is fixed, it'll be Rockwool batts to insulate between the uprights, with Tyvek or something similar to seal off the outer, with feather-edge cladding on the exterior. The inner wall is 11mm OSB, but not until the roof is watertight. 

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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8 hours ago, tomparryharry said:

Thank you for the tip  on gapping. I would have used something similar, but the 2p trick seems sound. Once the roof is fixed, it'll be Rockwool batts to insulate between the uprights, with Tyvek or something similar to seal off the outer, with feather-edge cladding on the exterior. The inner wall is 11mm OSB, but not until the roof is watertight. 

 

Cheers,

Ian.

 

Rather than feather-edge would not ship-lap be a better option?

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22 minutes ago, polybear said:

 

Rather than feather-edge would not ship-lap be a better option?

 

To be completely honest, I haven't made my mind up. There will be cladding, and Phil Harlequin has a very nice example. I've found a supplier of industrial-sized feather-edge ladding, some 5.1 metres, by 175mm. Plus, it's stained in black, and treated.   But, I don't know.... 

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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The cladding on my shed (and my house) was UK-grown larch, the idea being that larch doesn't need to be treated or painted - you just let it weather down naturally. And UK-grown to stay away from the Russians and their questionable environmental record.

 

You didn't say, Ian, but hopefully you're planning to have battens to hold the cladding boards off the Tyvek and allow some airflow behind? That helps the whole structure to stay dry. (You then need insect mesh top and bottom to prevent animals setting up home in the gap.)

 

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37 minutes ago, Harlequin said:

The cladding on my shed (and my house) was UK-grown larch, the idea being that larch doesn't need to be treated or painted - you just let it weather down naturally. And UK-grown to stay away from the Russians and their questionable environmental record.

 

You didn't say, Ian, but hopefully you're planning to have battens to hold the cladding boards off the Tyvek and allow some airflow behind? That helps the whole structure to stay dry. (You then need insect mesh top and bottom to prevent animals setting up home in the gap.)

 

 

Certainly treated battens, apart from holding the Tyvek in place, it provides a register for the cladding.  I need to investigate insect mesh, however; I haven't got to that bit yet.

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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2 hours ago, polybear said:

 

Rather than feather-edge would not ship-lap be a better option?

 

When he sees the difference in cost you'll hear the scream :D

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At the moment, the industrial-grade feather edge is leading the choice stakes. It comes  down to the ease of use, and relative cost. In my apprentice days, we we told that 'the best joint is no joint at all', and that sentiment still holds good today.  I'd like to keep the exterior face joints to an absolute minimum, even if it means I'll pay a bit more to achieve the result. The other big plus points are the width of boards (175mm) and the thickness, which is (according to the website) 33mm. 

 

I haven't got there yet, however, the cross braces are nearly done, but not finished. Today, I hope. 

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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I forgot to say: Larch has to be fixed while it's still green because it's prone to splitting if you nail it after it has seasoned a bit.

Also: If you are going to use timber that will remain untreated, use stainless steel nails because they don't rust and so don't leave ugly marks down the walls.

Also: Paslode nailguns  are amazingly useful and satisfying bits of kit to play with use responsibly!

 

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14 minutes ago, Harlequin said:

Also: Paslode nailguns  are amazingly useful and satisfying bits of kit to play with use responsibly!

 

There you go, corrected it for you. :D

 

I actually have a Senco gun, my Paslode gave up after 17 years and the Senco was 2/3rds the cost of a replacement. So far it's been fine to use.

I sold the Paslode on Ebay for £90 as spares even though I listed all the faults with it. ....bonkers..

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2 hours ago, Harlequin said:

I forgot to say: Larch has to be fixed while it's still green because it's prone to splitting if you nail it after it has seasoned a bit.

Also: If you are going to use timber that will remain untreated, use stainless steel nails because they don't rust and so don't leave ugly marks down the walls.

Also: Paslode nailguns  are amazingly useful and satisfying bits of kit to play with use responsibly!

 

 

Cheers Phil.  I would normally pilot drill for whatever fixing I'm using, nail or screws. I've got a black Belt in wood splitting.... 

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Some more excellent weather has allowed me to do a bit of catching up. Knowing my luck, It'll rain now.... However, the truss work is finally, fully completed. Along with the upper woodwork being 'pulled in' as the coach bolts were driven home, was somewhat gratifying. At last, off with the diagonal bracing, and the building emerges Parthenon-like from the building site.  Readers will know about the 'Modelling Mojo'. Well, this is a close second place....

 

Some more photos. Tomorrow, weather permitting, sees me going up in the world....

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4 minutes ago, tomparryharry said:

Some more excellent weather has allowed me to do a bit of catching up. Knowing my luck, It'll rain now.... However, the truss work is finally, fully completed. Along with the upper woodwork being 'pulled in' as the coach bolts were driven home, was somewhat gratifying. At last, off with the diagonal bracing, and the building emerges Parthenon-like from the building site.  Readers will know about the 'Modelling Mojo'. Well, this is a close second place....

 

Some more photos. Tomorrow, weather permitting, sees me going up in the world....

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Excellent work again. Great when you get to a milestone isn't it. It's looking really good and spuring me on to do mine. Currently clearing the ground work for the foundations today. :ok:

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