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sad to say, nothing much to report this weekend. The weather has been rubbish, enough to scupper my plans to complete the rear soakaway. I have a dislike of rainwater going down the back of my neck; more Harumph. The soakaway job is an act of preparation before the rear wall gets installed. The wall is not normally visible from the house, unless you actually go round there. The plan is to run an exterior skin of box profile, which runs from the soffit to about 200mm into the soakaway. The last 400mm is designed to be sacrificial, but it should see me into my grave. 

 

I still need to check over what I think is a tiny leak. There appears to be a dark patch on the interior sark, enough to make me want to check it again.  There is no way I'm going back onto the roof in this weather: The first reason is lifting roof parts is a surefire way to worsen things when rain is concerned, and the second is the high likelihood  of falling on my bum. No thanks......

 

Hopefully some photos soon.

 

Have a great week folks, and stay safe.

 

Ian.

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I don't know how much gardening you do but have you thought about a water butt? Free water always good. 

When i redid my shed i used treated timber and found it does dry out alot at least 5mm in the width so had to use exterior chalking for the gaps also any knots seem to wick water through also. Chalked and painted with masonry paint seems to have worked 

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8 hours ago, heavymetalwagons said:

I don't know how much gardening you do but have you thought about a water butt? Free water always good. 

When i redid my shed i used treated timber and found it does dry out alot at least 5mm in the width so had to use exterior chalking for the gaps also any knots seem to wick water through also. Chalked and painted with masonry paint seems to have worked 

 

Hi, yes, there will be water butts, although there's not a lot of gardening here. The last owner had 3 large greenhouses in the garden, and one of these provides the footprint for the shed project.  One greenhouse has gone to re-create the lawn, and the last one is a rose bed, which I'd like to keep if possible.  Our greenhouse gardener liked to keep things like squirrels out, whereas I don't mind the squirrels at all.

 

The timber here is all treated, and will dry out. The wood roof is a temperature moderator, which is underneath the steel sheet. If it does expand, it should be minimal. The front of the building is 4' on a wall, with the back at ground level, which I alluded to earlier. The rear timbers also rest on the DPC . The void between the uprights is 400mm between centres, which allows the insulation batts to go straight in without much fuss. The steel sheets at the rear are an anti-burglary feature to dissuade neer-do-wells. Because I didn't tank the rear wall exterior, water can drain through, via the surface drain, which is  10mm chippings down to the footings. I'm more concerned about humidity than anything else, so an extractor to take off the  humidity extremes will be installed. 

 

Cheers,

Ian.

Edited by tomparryharry
removed confusion.
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On 13/04/2020 at 21:23, tomparryharry said:

 

Yes, you're dead right. There's no DPC  on the job at the moment. All of the blockwork is straight off the foundations. My intention is partially 'first fix' the beam work, and then introduce the DPC before I strap down the beams to the wall. Like you've said, it saves grinding about on the membrane. The average height of the blockwork is 1,200 mm, so I guess there's enough meat to keep it all in place. The beams run to the outer wall, so there will be a lot of creosote going into the ends, and then faced off. 

 

 

I am just curious :  In the UK, do you have to submit detailed construction plans all approved by a civil engineer before you can start work ? We had to do that in Cairns, Australia before building a cabin in the back yard.

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7 hours ago, heavymetalwagons said:

I don't know how much gardening you do but have you thought about a water butt? Free water always good. 

When i redid my shed i used treated timber and found it does dry out alot at least 5mm in the width so had to use exterior chalking for the gaps also any knots seem to wick water through also. Chalked and painted with masonry paint seems to have worked 

 

What's exterior chalking please?  I've never heard of that term :unsure:

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54 minutes ago, polybear said:

 

What's exterior chalking please?  I've never heard of that term :unsure:

 

I think our friend means exterior caulking.  I remember watching an American programme, where it made reference to 'chinking'. "What the hell is chinking? It took me ages to realise that chinking and caulking are usually one & same. 

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6 hours ago, brian777999 said:

 

I am just curious :  In the UK, do you have to submit detailed construction plans all approved by a civil engineer before you can start work ? We had to do that in Cairns, Australia before building a cabin in the back yard.

 

Hi Brian. In certain parts of the UK, we've got PDR (Permitted Development Rights ) It does vary council by council however. 

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12 hours ago, tomparryharry said:

 

Hi Brian. In certain parts of the UK, we've got PDR (Permitted Development Rights ) It does vary council by council however. 

And as I'm sure @tomparryharryknows it also depends on whether you're in a conservation area, how close to the boundary or house you're building it, what part of your curtilage you're using (generally only at the back), whether your house is on a corner and, finally, how big it is.  Some of these issues lead to getting involved with planning applications, others (size particularly) could lead to having to apply to Building Control.  In all cases, keeping the neighbours on-side helps a lot.

 

Alan

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Keeping the neighbours on your side is vital. I've got excellent neighbours, and I like to keep it that way. I keep work very strictly o 'business hours, which is 9-5, and Saturday only. Sunday is completely out; I don't like disturbing them. Our nearest had a few thousand bricks in to redo his retaining wall, so  we all chipped in to move them.  Little things like that keeps it going, and spending time in conversation also works.  

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7 minutes ago, heavymetalwagons said:

caulking!!! Most stop posting late at night lol

 

Don't worry about it. I had a chap with me who would ask where the profane cylinders were kept. No one had the heart to tell him..... 

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Think i must be a bit dyslexic, never used to be tested for such things in my school days. Bottom class for English, top class for maths! 

There was a tarmac firm we used alot called lane rentals i called them line rentals for ages until someone put me right!!!! 

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Hello folks, a quick visit from here. Pleased to say that the rear soakaway has finally been completed. The photos shows the sacrificial steel sheet which runs the length of retaining wall, and is 400mm deep. 200mm of this is submerged into the chippings, which carry on down to the foundations, at about 1,200mm. Our topography here means we're on a bit of a slope, so the soak acts as a drain for any surface water that makes it this far. This week has been bucketing in the chippings to complete. I've put in one tonne bag of the 10mm sized chippings, and  there is another stood by in anticipation of settling out. 

 

The upper 200mm of the steel sheet rises up to connect with the shed bottom plates. In turn, these adjoin & overhang ( sorry, underhang )  the bottom edge of the wall cladding.  This coming week will hopefully see the walls going up 

 

Cheers,

Ian

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Thank you kind sir. The only fly in the ointment is awaiting the scaffolders to strike the scaffold (take it down). It's been 3 weeks overtime, so if it doesn't happen tomorrow, I may have to DIY. There is a known vertical 'rack-over' at one end. It's not much, but I know I can correct it. The problem is:- The scaffold is tight to the shed, and I can't move it. 

 

Ordering insulation tomorrow.

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Somewhere on another thread someone said that scaffolders often leave their stuff on-site until it's needed elsewhere - it saves them taking it back to the yard in between hirings !

 

The shed's looking great.

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Might have been me!

 

I had this exact problem years ago when the landlord of a flat I rented in Riverside had some work done on the rendering.  As I knew a chap in my local watering hole who was something of a character, a cage fighter with dreadlocks who once had his throat cut with murderous intent by some of the dodgy types he hung out with and calmly checked himself into Casualty holding his head on (!), not a guy to trifle with but I got on ok with him, who ran a scaffolding business out of a small yard nearby, I suggested one evening to him that, should this scaffolding, which must be worth a bit, not be there when I got up one morning, my natural assumption would be that it had been recovered by it's owners for their next job.  Purely by coincidence, of course, it was gone the following morning...

 

Perhaps this could be a solution to your problem; I am no longer in contact with the person concerned or I'd put you in touch, but those sort of people are a dangerous crowd...

Edited by The Johnster
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I had a pair of 4 beds under construction and the scaffolders were very slow to shift their gear when we wanted it down,  it was obvious I was being used for cheap storage and they didn't want to strike it until they had another job for it to go to.  

The easy remedy was to send them a message saying a group of travellers were on site telling me they were to take it down and could they confirm before I let them start. A lorry turned up about 30 minutes later with 2 blokes and it was gone within 24 hours.  

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Well, I decided not to get stressed about the scaffold. can I use it to my advantage?  Actually, yes I can.  I mentioned that the scaffold was up hard against the walls, so I slacked off the straker (The bit that goes to the floor diagonally) and prised the scaffold away from the wall by about 3 inches. Bingo! What a result! The 'rack-over' was very nearly cured, and a bump with some stored OSB sheets were used as a 'sliding hammer' approach to get the uprights;  upright.  Was I happy? Oh yes. As they say in the valleys... Happus Bunnus. 

 

I was going to start on the rear wall, but now it'll be making some diagonal extras to keep it sweet.  More rubbish photos ensued.

 

Keep it safe, folks.

Cheers,

Ian.

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Having 'sort of' squared up the one wall, it was time to make some diagonal braces, to keep the structure square. The first set went in ok, and the second pair went in even better. Each piece of wood is cut as an interference fit, so you need to lump (hammer) said pieces into place. It's very gratifying to hear the wood making a 'zzzt' sound as they go home. I've determined that the walls  will need 6 sets of diagonals; 2 each front & rear, and one set each left & right.  These braces conform pretty much to what you will see on a pre-grouping wagon, and work exactly the same. 

 

However... I re-inspected the first set of braces, and they look ok...Ish. They will do the job, but the second set improved on the first set. I know that when I get to set no6, I'll probably take out the the original one, and do it again. We'll see.

 

Head down, backside up.  We've ordered some 100mm Celotex for the insulation, and they've quoted 7-10 days delivery. Basically, I would like to get that back wall finished before a big lorry arrives. To cap it all, photo=phone is on the blink:- Bah! Well, you've got to laugh, really..

 

Cheers,

Ian.

Edited by tomparryharry
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Hello Folks, just a quick post from here. The diagonal braces  have been made, and installed. Well, 5 of the 6, anyway... Run out of wood.. However, onwards, forever onwards.

 

I've ordered some 100mm Kingspan  insulation for the walls. This is an ideal thickness, being capable of installation without too much fuss.  The quote was 7-10 day. Good! Enough time to finish up some work, and clear some space. Oh dear me, no... just had a message, delivery Tuesday.... Bu66er! Never mind, at least I'll have it 'in stock'. 

 

On a really positive upside, we now (finally ) turn our attention to the OSB sheets. Mrs Smith has noticed that the sheets have been here for 6 months, so it's time to finally start setting out ready for install. 

 

Cheers,

Ian.

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I'm not sure how much you intended putting in but just one set of braces per side is enough to keep it square, especially if you are going to use OSB either inside or out.  If you think about modern timber framed houses they just use the OSB and nothing else.

Looking good :good_mini:

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I used Kingspan for the insulation of the roof and side wall on my workshop. 

 

It keeps the temperature inside quite stable, which is what I wanted.  we only used the 75mm thickness variety, so if you are using 100 mm it should work really well.

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