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AyJay

How to handle the edge of the world?

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Yes, I said edge, not end.

I am constructing a street of houses to populate a corner of my layout. The houses have been discussed elsewhere on this site.

However, a different issue has popped up and it's something that others here have had to deal with.

Having played around with positioning, I have settled on the position in the attached photo.

There is just room for one more building in the space to the right of the one that I'm currently working on, I want to secure them together to make a terrace.

However, I am on the edge of the baseboard and the wall is 3cm beyond that.  The layout is OO gauge by the way.

The edge would run from the rear left corner of my proposed extra kit, to the front right corner, so I would have all of the front, reducing to a point as I go back.

 

Up to this point, I really have not thought about blending into the background, I have bought some sheets of townscene, which I might stick onto the wall behind.

There is a lot of work (and many hours) involved in making one of these kits,  so I don't want to go ahead if it is all wrong.

Do I just go ahead and make half a building, trusting that after a while I just won't notice?

I would be interested in hearing how others have handled this problem?  Thank you.

 

IMG_2457.JPG

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Perhaps a mock up in plain card would be the best start point?  That way you could play about with dimensions and angles if necessary.

 

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Posted (edited)

The key thing to avoid is the building’s ridge line getting chopped by the back scene because it will look artificial. The ridge line is the horizon and any chopping that is required behind it should be OK because it will be hidden.

Grandmother? Eggs?

Edited by Harlequin
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Your main problem looks like being the roof of your end building. Chopping about a full sized pitched roof will end up with some awkward angles, although I am sure that there are real-life examples of buildings in that sort of plot. Why not go for a small car repair garage or similar workshop with a flat or shallow sloped roof. They were often fitted into odd spaces and corner plots. I like the general look of the buildings - a good urban feel to the scene.

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Hi all,

Why not just create a yard with wooden fencing. That way you shape it to what ever size you want. The back scene could be behind the wooden fence. A small shed in the corner could give it some height and clutter could give it some depth.

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Probably not much help, but what about an urban style chapel or church hall? The kind of building that has a taller facade than the actual roofline? Your facade could run up to the edge of the world, being effectively a few brick courses deep from front to back, and the roof runs away from the facade at a lower level. At normal viewing angles, the facade should hide up the awkward corner.  I've attached a few pictures off a quick google search, and indicated where the roof could perhaps be further lowered to aid the illusion. Quite a lot of Methodist churches can be found squeezed in amongst a row of terraced houses!

 

 

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I have the answer to the problem, thank you teaky, harlequin and everyone else for your suggestions.

I made a quick mock-up, cut to follow the line of the edge of the board.  When put in place and with a sheet of townscene behind it, it looks absolutely fine.

Because of the shape of the roof, you cannot see the missing section behind the ridge line.  I might experiment with curling the townscene sheet around the window frame and cutting/pasting some additional images in front, with a small space between them, to give an impression of depth.

 

The second picture shows my mock-up alongside the model that it will connect to. From above, you can see the shape of the rear and how it is cropped.

Problem solved :-)  Thanks all.  I'll post a picture when it is all finished.

 

 

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IMG_2461.JPG

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Posted (edited)

I'll still offer an alternative solution, which I thought up before getting to your last post …….

 

A couple of fences, one on the line of your house fronts and the other at right angles to it, a footpath's width from the last house, and a big tree suggesting the fences form the corner of a park. The terraced backscene seen through/around the tree might look better than it does as you've shown it hard against the extra house, I think.

 

NIce work though, however you finish it off.

Edited by Chimer
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Google George Iliffe Stokes.  MRJ had a feature on his work some years ago. I once came across a couple of his dioramas in glass cases in a railway museum. Amazing use of perspective.

In more recent years Copenhagen Fields applies some of these principals to great effect. Whilst we all have time to think and experiment, try another version of this building which loses about two or three mm in height as it approaches the backscene. This could be achieved by taking one mm each from the roof, upper floor and ground floor. This will require some scratch building, but would look to be on the way to developing those skills. The other side of the street is what it is so leave it alone.

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How about no building?

 

Model a space where a building was, but has now been demolished , leaving just a a set of large wooden/steel supports shoring up the side of next door building. You could have some fun modelling the wallpaper on the remaining wall.

 

Temporary%20works,%20Newcastle.JPG

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3 hours ago, wirey33 said:

How about no building?

 

Model a space where a building was, but has now been demolished , leaving just a a set of large wooden/steel supports shoring up the side of next door building. You could have some fun modelling the wallpaper on the remaining wall.

 

Temporary%20works,%20Newcastle.JPG

Ahhh the Lonsdale in Jesmond, I’ve stumbled out of there more times than I care to remember! There’s a Sainsbury’s there where those props are now.

 

Sorry for going OT.

 

Rich.

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On 05/04/2020 at 10:49, cypherman said:

Hi all,

Why not just create a yard with wooden fencing. That way you shape it to what ever size you want. The back scene could be behind the wooden fence. A small shed in the corner could give it some height and clutter could give it some depth.

 

 

I was thinking along these lines as well. Although my idea was to have wooden gates with the name of the brewery on them, and have the space (and that behind) as a delivery area for the pub, which would also serve as a turning point for all vehicles. You could have a big 'Keep Clear' sign painted on the road. 

 

 

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I think you're on the right track, AyJay.

 

The end of my world:

 

1901g.jpg.1475543a09acb9cd257c62049a8fda8a.jpg

 

 

This is an overhead view when it was under construction:

 

0501a.jpg.5c2b8050d229f50d24d2653debb25f6f.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Scott

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Jukebox. Wow! that is fantastic.  I particularly like the effect of the shallow relief buildings at the back and the stormy looking sky.

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