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Hunslet 16" 0-6-0 ST


Nick Mitchell
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Those who know how to paint locomotives will be able to tell me that I'm doing this in completely the wrong order, but after waiting 72 hours for the green to harden, I went for red as the next colour in the end. I figured it would be easier to mask the buffer beams to spray the black than the other way round. In hindsight, that might not have been such a good call, as everything that would have been black ended up being masked off (along with the green) as I sprayed the red paint. I think I was worrying about the red covering any black overspray, but it has covered the green on the rear buffer beam with no problems.

 

On all the locos I have painted fully so far (ok - both of them!) the livery has been black, and the buffer beams have been brush painted in after an overall coat of gloss black. Using thinned red paint on a black buffer beam has allowed a natural dirty look as a good base for further weathering. For Beatrice I wanted something cleaner, so masking and spraying was the order of the day. Well out of my comfort zone, but I think I've got away with it. The paint is Humbrol gloss red, thinned 1:1 with white spirit. While I was at it, I sprayed the coupling rods red. There are a couple of other red bits on the loco (rods under the tank on the right side, and a few bits in the cab) but these will have to be brushed in much later on.

 

There were a couple of places along the bottom edge of the bunker where the red crept under the masking tape (which was Tamya), but this was easily removed with a brush moistened with white spirit. Looking at the photos now, I can see the brush tip caught the top of the vacuum stand pipe.

 

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Better painters than me would do it all by brush, but I want to spray as much of the black as I can to get an even coverage - especially of the smokebox and chimney. Some parts of the footplate will almost certainly need to be brushed in though. The masking will be interesting...

 

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On 13/02/2021 at 01:39, Nick Mitchell said:

I had my airbrush out earlier this week and gave Beatrice a coat of etching primer.

All my recently found confidence (well, confidence may be a bit of an exaggeration, but I had become slightly less terrified) disappeared when I inspected the results close up.

Poor Beatrice looked like she'd been left in a spider-infested shed for a hundred years: the dreaded cobwebbing had visited me once again.

I thought I had done everything the same as the previous time I used this primer (Phoenix Precision 2-pack), but something was obviously not right.

 

 

Hi Nick.

 

After seeing your results I wondered to myself if it was worth investing in some of this 2 pack primer to see if it was any better than the regular aerosol paint I have been using from Halfords. When checking the website I came across this little nugget of information...

 

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As a result I am now not sure if it is the right stuff for me. It might be what is causing your problems maybe?

 

Julia.

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1 hour ago, -missy- said:

 

Hi Nick.

 

After seeing your results I wondered to myself if it was worth investing in some of this 2 pack primer to see if it was any better than the regular aerosol paint I have been using from Halfords. When checking the website I came across this little nugget of information...

 

image.png.d0899c42ac235dbf8dbec689736e73cb.png

 

As a result I am now not sure if it is the right stuff for me. It might be what is causing your problems maybe?

 

Julia.

 

Thanks for that Julia. Please don't let my incompetence put you off having a go!

I think I have been following a lot of that advice inadvertently - even down to using a Badger 200 single action internal mix airbrush (which my grandfather gave me when I was a teenager - what incredible foresight he had!). I have been using an Iwata neo double action for applying the gloss.

The surface preparation I used was a mild acid wash with Shiny Sinks in an ultrasonic cleaner.

The PQ17 pre-paint cleaner mentioned is actually cellulose thinners, and is what I have been adding to my "mix".

I have had fantastic results with this primer. When it goes right, it is brilliant. I don't airbrush often enough to really get the feel for it, and so my results are not consistent. I do want to persist with it and get it right more often.

On reflection, there are two potential causes of my cobwebs. One might be too high air:paint ratio (too much air). I tend to be a bit tentative, especially when I'm out of practice. The other might be the paint not thinned enough. The bit on the website quoted above about mixing equal quantities of thinners and paint, and there being a 3-hour pot life is fantasy.

 

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Do you ever have days when your modelling feels like it is going backwards?

I had a day like that earlier this week when I picked up Beatrice and the front functional coupling dropper came off in my fingers.

Within a couple of minutes, the rear one had come off as well. Bizzarre!

I had picked it up to try the loco body on the chassis, to see what it looked like with both halves painted.

Especially I wanted to see how conspicuous the gap between the firebox sides and front would be. It is more exposed on the fireman's side, but the addition of fire irons later will disguise it further.

 

I took the photo below in a rare shaft of sunlight coming through the window. The colour looks quite different in natural light.

 

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Once the sun had gone in, I took the following short video to prove that it runs nicely before I ruin it.

 

 

Today I spent a bit of time making some repairs.

I reattached the coupling droppers. The front one took a few attempts, and unfortunately I lingered too long with the soldering iron and the paint has blackened.

 

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The re-fitting rear coupling was more successful.

I also made and fitted a new guard iron for the rear right corner of the chassis. This was very tricky to hold and solder, but I have got away without too much damage to the paint.

 

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5 hours ago, 2mmKiwi said:

Looking good Nick, you must be a bit of a night owl posted 4.00am UK time?

Technically it was only 8 minutes past 3, but yes - I am naturally nocturnal. The only problem with that is I still have to get up in the morning for work :(

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Hi Nick,just been looking at your blog.Wow what a super little loco youve got there .I dont think one ran on Backworth rails.

as i cant seem to find a picture of one. No doubt Geordie in exile has some info to that as he is also from the area.

Keep up the good work and enjoy.Regars Ray.

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2 hours ago, Trewisin said:

Hi Nick,just been looking at your blog.Wow what a super little loco youve got there .I dont think one ran on Backworth rails.

as i cant seem to find a picture of one. No doubt Geordie in exile has some info to that as he is also from the area.

Keep up the good work and enjoy.Regars Ray.

The prototype for my model spent its entire working (pre-preservation) life at Ackton Hall colliery near Pontefract.

When I finish it, the livery will be as close to "as currently preserved" as my skills allow, and it is definitely a "Rule 1" project.

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  • 4 months later...
1 hour ago, chrisveitch said:

I'm sure you're not stuck for "next projects", but that little tram loco you've been playing with looks like it would be an interesting 2mm challenge...

 

It is an absolutely awesome machine. I want one!

I'm really hoping Paul "Piglet" Middleton will allow it to stay at Embsay for a while, or visit us again soon.

 

For anyone who doesn't know what Chris is talking about, Joining Beatrice and the resident NER Autocar at Embsay last weekend were three visiting locomotives. On Monday I spent the day firing No.8 "Lucie", a Cockerill Type IV 0-4-0 tram loco as she hauled our set of Victorian and Edwardian 6-wheelers. I was pleased to get the text on Sunday night saying Lucie was replacing visiting Terrier "Knowle" on the roster (firing the Terrier had nearly killed me on Saturday), and I couldn't stop grinning all day. She has Walschaerts' valve gear, but unusually the return rods are driven by eccentrics inside the frames. I'd never fired anything with a vertical boiler before, but it steamed brilliantly and thought nothing of our 2 miles of 1:100 out of Bolton Abbey, thrashing along at 15-20mph while sounding like a Black 5 on an express...

 

A model would certainly be a challenge, but do-able I think. The water tank is fairly large (basically the whole of one end) and the boiler has room to conceal a motor.

 

 

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55 minutes ago, Nick Mitchell said:

For anyone who doesn't know what Chris is talking about, Joining Beatrice and the resident NER Autocar at Embsay last weekend were three visiting locomotives. On Monday I spent the day firing No.8 "Lucie", a Cockerill Type IV 0-4-0 tram loco as she hauled our set of Victorian and Edwardian 6-wheelers

Magnifique! It certainly makes a splendid noise. 

 

In some photos it looks like you're standing in a hole - does it have a bit of dropped footplate to access the firehole door or is this an illusion?

 

 

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1 hour ago, chrisveitch said:

In some photos it looks like you're standing in a hole - does it have a bit of dropped footplate to access the firehole door or is this an illusion?

 

It is no illusion. The firehole door is below the level of the footplate. It is actually quite easy to fire with the world's smallest shovel - once you get used to the idea that the grate is circular! There are no dampers, so you have no control over the rate of combustion other than with the blower. The ash pan (a flat, round tray) is almost touching the floor.

 

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