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Virtual Members' Day Exhibition - the demo stands


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We couldn't hold our annual Members' Day event in Taunton this year, scheduled for Sunday 26th April but what we are doing is bringing you that plus much, much more in virtual form.

 

This topic is for the demonstrator (not) attending and will open up for set-up on Sunday morning at 7.30am. I know there is some great content to appear.

 

This will be a time to enjoy, so much ahead of the day has focussed upon the fundraiser for NHS Charities Together which has had a phenomenal response from the modellers and trade. You can still purchase draw tickets up until midnight tonight and the draw will be held on Monday 27 April.

 

I shall not be there bright and early on Sunday!

 

(Topic will be unlocked at 7.30 on Sunday)

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16 minutes ago, Mick Bonwick said:

WEATHERING TECHNIQUES

 

One way of eliminating confusion about beginnings is to find a video clip, magazine article or book that shows a result that you like and then follow that author/poster and their choice of materials, tools and techniques. If you still can’t decide then I suggest you seek out material by Martyn Welch, Tim Shackleton or George Dent in publications, or KNP and NHY581 on RMweb. There are many others, but these few will restrict your choice and still provide inspiration.

 

Examples to follow . . . . . . . .

 

Never too early to talk about weathering!

 

One might add to the para above - "or look at Mick Bonwick's excellent weathering thread on RM Web", but I know that modesty forbids! :unsure:

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All set up and ready to talk b..........! CK is doing a marvelous Tommy Cooper impression!

The 2mm locos demo is from a few years ago

 

Jerry, back later when its time for cake!

 

IMG_1763_(2).PNG.e90720582fa2a592d36c2b369354072d.PNG

 

 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Brinkly said:

I’ve set up the P4 stand.

 

I will post some bits in a little while

 

No rush, we realise it takes time to get the hair shirt on, along with the jacket with leather elbow patches and time to fire up the pipe!

 

Mike.

 

Mike.

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2 minutes ago, Mick Bonwick said:

Her: Will you be in front of that screen all day?

 

Him: Yes, I expect so.

 

Her: Will you be wanting coffee?

 

 

Very much a similar version here earlier this morning:

 

Her: Will you be in front of that screen all day?

 

Him: Yes, I expect so.

 

Her: I'm going back to sleep.

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OXFORD RAIL JANUS GRILLES

 

Tools

 

Rigger brush – long bristles to hold plenty of fluid and sharp point to place the fluid accurately.

 

Glass dish – won’t be attacked by solvent and used to hold clean white spirit.

 

Paper towels – to clean up the mess.

 

 

Materials

 

MIG Productions Dark Wash – my favourite, but any dark coloured wash will do the job. I favour enamel washes as they always seem to work well, but you may prefer to use acrylic washes. If using acrylics, then any mention of white spirit should be read as acrylic thinners.

 

Janus_289.JPG.8b5b6e92652868840acd68ad774663fc.JPG

 

Even though a wash is, essentially, a ready-thinned paint, it can be thinned even further to allow it to be used to highlight detail using capillary action.

 

In the case of the Janus, the grille detail on this bright yellow example can be made more prominent by adding a dark coloured wash to the appropriate areas.

 

Start by dipping the rigger brush into clean white spirit before just touching the tip of the bristles into the wash. Touch the tip of the brush to any corner of detail and watch the fluid flow along the edges and corners.

 

In this picture, the tip of the brush has been touched to the top right-hand corner of the grille and then moved downwards one slat at a time. In this example the wash is too thick, and hasn’t flowed very well, so the tip of the brush needs to be dipped into the white spirit again, to thin it out a little more.

 

 

 

Janus_290a.JPG.0edf1fef7b6e1fbdcd8ee5ea7dac6bf0.JPG

 

 

Once the grilles were all completed, attention turned to the panel edges and other detail lines. There are many blobs! There will be blobs, it is inevitable, but don’t worry about them because they can be dealt with later.

 

The wash has been allowed to run into all the crooks and nannies moulded into the bonnet area. You should be able to identify all the places where the tip of the brush was placed against the detail. If the wash does not run far enough, just leave the tip of the brush in place for a bit longer.

 

In some cases, the wash will not run far enough, even though the tip of the brush has been left in place for longer. When this happens the tip of the brush can be placed appropriately to add more fluid to the detail. The three white arrowheads show where this has been done in this example.

 

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9 minutes ago, Mick Bonwick said:

OXFORD RAIL JANUS GRILLES

 

Tools

 

Rigger brush – long bristles to hold plenty of fluid and sharp point to place the fluid accurately.

 

Glass dish – won’t be attacked by solvent and used to hold clean white spirit.

 

Paper towels – to clean up the mess.

 

 

Materials

 

MIG Productions Dark Wash – my favourite, but any dark coloured wash will do the job. I favour enamel washes as they always seem to work well, but you may prefer to use acrylic washes. If using acrylics, then any mention of white spirit should be read as acrylic thinners.

 

The wash has been allowed to run into all the crooks and nannies moulded into the bonnet area. You should be able to identify all the places where the tip of the brush was placed against the detail. If the wash does not run far enough, just leave the tip of the brush in place for a bit longer.

 

In some cases, the wash will not run far enough, even though the tip of the brush has been left in place for longer. When this happens the tip of the brush can be placed appropriately to add more fluid to the detail. The three white arrowheads show where this has been done in this example.

 

 

I used to know a girl named Janus Grilles :)

 

Serious question Mick - If I have already painted a wagon in Humbrol enamels, can I still use the wash in this way or will the enamel paint cause it to run to places where I don't want it?

 

Second question - and what if I have not only pained the model but also sprayed it with Dullcote?

 

Tony

 

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1 minute ago, Tony Teague said:

 

Serious question Mick - If I have already painted a wagon in Humbrol enamels, can I still use the wash in this way or will the enamel paint cause it to run to places where I don't want it?

 

Second question - and what if I have not only pained the model but also sprayed it with Dullcote?

 

 

First answer: You probably could, but only if the surface is perfectly smooth. If there are any brush marks or small pieces of dust you may well find the wash in places you don't want it. Try it and see - you can always clean it up from the wrong places with some white spirit on a cotton bud or follow the blob removal process, yet to be posted. ;)

 

Second answer: A wash will not work as well on top of Dullcote, because the uneven nature of the surface may attract the wash into the wrong places. I have successfully applied a capillary action wash over Dullcote surfaces, though, and one of the results can be seen in Step 4 here:

 

https://accurascale.co.uk/blogs/lets-get-involved/wagon-weathering-with-mick-bonwick-lets-get-involved

 

 

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Another couple of clips of P4 stock in action on Balcombe.

 

 

Shunting can be done, even without buffer heads! (I don't joke! For years, and I mean years, these wagons ran on our test track without buffer heads).

 

 

Regards,

 

Nick.

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Want sound on your layout but cant get a system in the loco - or cant afford it?

Plant a bluetooth speaker under the board, link to your mobile, find an appropriate track on Youtube and synchronise your train with the sound.

 

 

If you enjoyed that see our other content on the layout and catering thread.

 

Cheers

 

Phil Bullock

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Want a coach that isnt available RTR but terrified by brass kits?

 

Consider cut and shut. Heres how we did a Mk1 BFK from other Bachmann coaches

 

For me this thread epitomises the friendship, knowledge and support that is what RMweb is all about! Have a go......

image1 (4).jpeg

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Right, I've been chatting for to long already; I blame @chrisf :lol: 

 

So, we turn our attention to the first helpless victim; a Bachmann RTR mineral wagon. This wagon belongs to @Re6/6. I offered to convert it a while ago and thought today would be an ideal opportunity to work on it! Best not b*gger it up!

 

The first task is to remove the 00 wheels and put them somewhere safe; someone else can make use of them. Tension lock coupling also is removed and sent on to @BlackRat via Royal Mail courier! Unscrew the chassis and detach the body. All straight foward. 

 

 IMG_4390.jpg.4d60a23f7a81da0837da6344a3823c77.jpg

John had already had a go with this chassis, but hadn't completed the job. 

 

IMG_4391.jpg.d735758a6b76596a7709395c46c7dfa4.jpg

Now, we take our pillar drill, with a fairly large bit, and drill out the well directly above the moulded w-iron. We need to do this because the face of the wheel catches on the plastic. This is the safest way to do it. Do not try and cut through the plastic; it will end in tears!

 

IMG_4392.jpg.4d8932da0361866d3fe4c8d8a160885d.jpg

This leaves us with a fairly rough cut. 

 

IMG_4430.jpg.429c8f1b91e2b2a0ffda6349ef94566e.jpg

 

Clean up starts with a combination of files, working from a fairly deep cut, down to fine. The Swan Morton No 15A is good for tidying up the edges, but do most of this with the file. 

IMG_4393.jpg.2fe59d5b65480f370ba7b52aa94f0b82.jpg

This should be your end result. 

 

IMG_4394.jpg.07c125ade96db6ae4fd0b29d693a2946.jpg

Repeat for all four and clean up. 

IMG_4395.jpg.7a330f9574794610f7d9f01682234933.jpg

Before fitting the wheels, a small amount of plastic on the rear of the brake shoe will need to be removed. It might be advantagous to bend the shoe out a little to clear the flange of the wheel. Here you can see one set of wheels has already been fitted. Nothing has been done to the axlebox. 

 

IMG_4428.jpg.ab79b3c02e795566afc639f004a6cb9d.jpg

Give it a quick test and check the wheels run smoothly. I've fitted a Smiths coupling to this wagon and repaired the damaged buffer heads (not me John it came like that!). IMG_4429.jpg.d3cecf4ec4baeb4e0e65fa27d5bcfcd1.jpg

Give it a quick bench test to make sure you don't have any wobble or wayward behaviour and fit some additional weight. This one has a piece of roof lead inside cut slightly smaller than floor dimensions. Total weight is around 51 grams: spot on! 

 

John, she is ready for service on Balcombe!

 

More on springing in a bit. 

 

Best wishes,


Nick

 

 

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Once I have double checked the Comet plans against prototype photos (where possible) I then mark out the roof with positions of roof vents and handrails. A set of compasses is really useful for this job. All the holes then need to be drilled out. Hand drilling aluminium can be a tedius and painful process so I use the pillar drill.

 

IMG_0451.JPG.24a53e6198d2a7673e9c605d7ae25624.JPG

 

Always try and prop the roof up so the point you are drilling is as close to 90 degrees to the drill. This will reduce the chances of the drill wandering and also decrease the likelihood of the drill bit snapping.

 

Once the holes have been opened out if necessary you can glue in the supplied roof vents. I do this from behind with superglue. .45 wire is used to form any hand rails on the roof.

The roof mounted water tanks are 20thou plastic sheet. Using the supplied plan cut to size and preform a curve using a knife handle or similar.

Then secure with superglue to the roof. You will need to clamp this while the glue sets

 

IMG_E0423.JPG.4c5daa56a60215883bd3fa3975ae14e0.JPG

 

The roof panels are made using thin tape supplied by Comet (C20). Using prototype pictures the spacings of the panels are identified (note GWR coaches did not have regular sized roof panels but each panel was the same size as the compartment beneath - This means on a composite the spacing of the tape is not constant).

The tape is laid over the roof overlength. I then strengthen the ends with a drop of runny superglue and then trim the ends. (Note this is not the roof from the brake second I have used for most of the demo photos)

 

IMG_0452.JPG.65dd6b5d38edd9b45f8d242806a6dc18.JPG

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