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Posted (edited)

Thought I might as well start a thread about my planned 00 gauge layout, which is still in the design stage. Updates on layout progress, as well as posts about modelling projects (locos, rolling stock etc.) will appear from time to time.

 

The Background

 

The idea behind this layout dates back to the 1970's, when my father spent the majority of his summer holidays as a child at his great-grandparents, who lived in Tupton. Situated immediately north of Clay Cross Junction, Tupton was the site of the exchange sidings for the Avenue Carbonisation plant. Coal trains, usually formed of mineral wagons / hoppers hauled by pairs of class 20's would regularly arrive in the yard, with one of the plants industrial shunters taking the wagons up the incline to the plant, crossing over the mainline via a flyover. This provided some great interest between trains passing by on the mainline.

 

As for the mainline traffic, there was a huge volume of freight traffic on this route (it still has its moments today, but the demise of coal has made a huge impact). Freights could often be held on the up slow at Tupton whilst waiting for a path to cross on to the Derby line at Clay Cross. This sometimes led to multiple freights queuing up. On the passenger side there were the midland mainline St Pancras - Sheffield expresses, almost exclusively hauled by 45/1's, at this time all based at Toton. Also common were the NE / SW trains and Nottingham -Glasgow's, usually hauled by 45's, 46's & 47's. Other inter-regional trains appeared, such as the Harwich Parkeston Quay - Manchester Piccadilly boat train and its return working, which often provided Stratford motive power. 

 

It was an interesting time in railway history, with contrasts between steam-era unbraked mineral trains, running side by side with modern air-braked Freightliners & MGR's. My father started collecting various models and detailing them when I was young, hoping to recreate these scenes in miniature. Unfortunately life got in the way, and he sold the majority of his collection. However, the seed was planted in my head, and I intend to pick up where he left off. 

 

The Concept

 

Modelling the real locations would take up too much space, even in my slightly larger than average garage at just under 20' x 9'. I had considered modelling the north end of Chesterfield station with the crossovers for the start of Tapton Junction, but decided that it would not give quite as much operational interest and scope.

 

The 'its my railway' rule then came into force, and I decided on a fictitious arrangement, but set in a real place. The location would essentially be Tapton Junction, just north of Chesterfield, where the lines diverge either to Sheffield (predominately passenger) or via Barrow Hill on the 'Old Road' (freight). It would also feature exchange sidings for a carbonisation plant, similar to those at Tupton. Hence the name, Tupton Junction. Below is the current track plan I have designed for this layout using AnyRail. The area marked out in blue is the scenic section. The area marked out in red will essentially be a lifting hatch to allow easier access for equipment in and out of the garage door when not operating the layout. The purple lines in the storage yard (bottom) are a visual aid to which roads are for which main running line. The grey boxes are obstructions within the garage. 

 

image.png.39cb3f32606bc718357ca53b56957730.png

 

The line which can be seen spiraling in the bottom left-hand corner of the layout will be a helix, proving access from the exchange sidings in the scenic area up to a the carbonisation plant. Part of the plant will feature on a narrower board above the storage yard, whilst still allowing access to the roads below. This will allow for a bit more scenic modelling, rather than just on one side of the layout, and provide even more operational interest with the industrial shunters busy at work. Whilst I am aware of the issues with helix's and steep gradients, this will only be for short trains of short wheelbase locos and wagons, running at slow speeds, so this arrangement should not be an issue.

 

In the scenic section, as well as the exchange sidings, we have the four track mainline. From top to bottom in this view we have the 'down main', 'up main', 'down slow' and 'up slow'. To the south is Chesterfield (left on plan) and to the north is either Sheffield or Barrow Hill (right on plan). At this point the lines have not yet diverged, but one string of crossovers is shown, which allows freights to crossover between the fast lines and the slow lines. Crossovers on the non-scenic section allow freights to cross onto the fast lines from their slow line storage sidings, before returning via the scenic crossovers. There is enough room for down freights doing this to be held at signals on the scenic section, if an up express is nearby for example. The other set of crossovers to allow trains to cross in the opposite direction are not modeled, but it can be imagined that these are off scene to the south. This will justify having another set of signals for southbound trains at the left-hand end of the plan. 

 

As well as freights crossing over and passengers speeding by, there will be the occasional trip working by a Barrow Hill class 08 to/from Chesterfield goods yard, which may also pick up crippled, and set down repaired wagons in the exchange sidings. DMU's running from Sheffield to Chesterfield and back will also operate in between the expresses. Dead end sidings in the storage yard for DMU's and trip workings can be seen on the plan above. 

 

I have ensured that any tight curves are outside the confines of the scenic section. For space reasons, the northern end of the exchange sidings is not part of the scenic section. Below are some 3D views from AnyRail which give some idea of the views from the bridges at either end of the scenic section, which will act as scenic breaks. 

 

image.png.50b0e59510c4367a4c60259cbfd2841c.png

 

Above: View looking 'south' from the 'north' end of the layout. The exchange sidings can be seen on the left, with the crossovers on the mainlines in the centre.

 

image.png.03c139e49ead89fb2ec930529b55b24b.png

 

Above: View looking 'north' from the 'south' end of the layout. The throat of the sidings on the right will be a busy spot for shunting movements.

 

The layout will be set firmly in the summer of 1977, with appropriate motive power and rolling stock to suit the time period and location. At this time, all headcodes were either set to '0000' or featured the then new 'domino's', with some loco's starting to receive marker lights on passing through the works. This means I don't have to worry about loco's carrying the wrong headcode when hauling different trains. 

 

Hope you enjoy this thread as it materialises.

 

 

Cameron

 

 

Edited by Mophead45143
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Given that most of your layout will be "out in the country", there probably wouldn't be too much inconsistency if you ran it in different phases, say mid'60's, your plan summer of '77, and even into the '80's with 56's and 58's. I don't know when the semaphores were replaced around here which would be a critical timing. If you are concerned about headcodes being right, you can get a long way by having different codes at each end, and unless you're going to make up precise consists for each train that gives quite a bit of leeway. One thing that really annoys me at Shows is to see Class 1 headcodes on a train of 16t minerals, and this really isn't necessary!

 

It's an area I used to know well, doing a lot of lineside photography in the '90's and early noughties, when it was still very active with freight. As you say, the end of coal mining and supply to power stations has really knocked the traffic for six.

 

Perhaps you could tell us in due course the gauge and scale. It is a big project, not least in the joinery to make the boards to get started, so good luck!

 

John.

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Cameron,

 

Impressive plans. That's going to keep you busy for plenty of years ... I do like it when someone takes the time to draw up the layout in software before committing to construction. It gives a nice overall sense of the layout.

 

You might want to invest in some working timetables; mandatory services - aka passenger services, and conditional services - aka freight. I managed to get 1974 mandatory and 1972 conditional for my layout of Burton-on-Trent, and they cover Chesterfield to Barnt Green. They give you a better realisation of the actual services running and the headcode.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, John Tomlinson said:

Given that most of your layout will be "out in the country", there probably wouldn't be too much inconsistency if you ran it in different phases, say mid'60's, your plan summer of '77, and even into the '80's with 56's and 58's. I don't know when the semaphores were replaced around here which would be a critical timing. If you are concerned about headcodes being right, you can get a long way by having different codes at each end, and unless you're going to make up precise consists for each train that gives quite a bit of leeway. One thing that really annoys me at Shows is to see Class 1 headcodes on a train of 16t minerals, and this really isn't necessary!

 

It's an area I used to know well, doing a lot of lineside photography in the '90's and early noughties, when it was still very active with freight. As you say, the end of coal mining and supply to power stations has really knocked the traffic for six.

 

Perhaps you could tell us in due course the gauge and scale. It is a big project, not least in the joinery to make the boards to get started, so good luck!

 

John.

 

You're absolutely right, there is some scope for running trains of differing time periods. Looking at photographs, the signalling in the Chesterfield area was all colour lights at least from the late 60's/early 70's, probably when Tapton Jn got remodeled into the 'ladder' style as with my plan. I may end up doing some 90's era stuff in the future, as that's what I remember as a child. However, I am very fond of the BR blue days, and I have collected a vast amount of stock to suit the late 70's period.

 

You make good points about getting around the issues with incorrect headcodes, but I also chose the 0000/domino era out of preference. I thought they looked good, and I quite like the look of a loco with wonky 0's when they started to slip out of alignment. It's also quite fun to model! The year 1977 had a good mixture of both headcode types. There were also still some of green loco's knocking about in the area then too, notably a few dozen 20's and a handful of 47's based out at Toton. I have chosen 20151, 20177 & 47356 to represent these. They will of course be lost in a sea of blue. 

 

And how could I forget! It'll be in 00 gauge, code 75. Fast lines to be flat bottom CWR with concrete sleepers, a bit of this on the slow with perhaps the odd section of jointed track left, and finally bullhead in the sidings. 

 

Cameron

 

Edited by Mophead45143
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ISW said:

Cameron,

 

Impressive plans. That's going to keep you busy for plenty of years ... I do like it when someone takes the time to draw up the layout in software before committing to construction. It gives a nice overall sense of the layout.

 

You might want to invest in some working timetables; mandatory services - aka passenger services, and conditional services - aka freight. I managed to get 1974 mandatory and 1972 conditional for my layout of Burton-on-Trent, and they cover Chesterfield to Barnt Green. They give you a better realisation of the actual services running and the headcode.

 

 

 

Thank you! Believe me this must be the 100th version of this layout I've drawn up, and it may well not be the last! I find AnyRail a really handy tool to get the idea of what will work in a space, particularly factoring in curve tightness and track spacing etc. Currently I have started prepping the garage before construction actually starts (we only moved into our house last Autumn), and I want to make sure this is right first.

 

And yes, finding some old timetables would be a good idea. So far I only have a handful of train identities that could form an imaginary one, but working from a real timetable would be better (even if it gets altered a bit). Where did you source yours out of curiosity? 

 

Cameron

Edited by Mophead45143

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41 minutes ago, Mophead45143 said:

 

Thank you! Believe me this must be the 100th version of this layout I've drawn up, and it may well not be the last! I find AnyRail a really handy tool to get the idea of what will work in a space, particularly factoring in curve tightness and track spacing etc. Currently I have started prepping the garage before construction actually starts (we only moved into our house last Autumn), and I want to make sure this is right first.

 

And yes, finding some old timetables would be a good idea. So far I only have a handful of train identities that could form an imaginary one, but working from a real timetable would be better (even if it gets altered a bit). Where did you source yours out of curiosity? 

 

Cameron

Cameron,

 

Whereas you used AnyRail for your layout, I used 3rdPlanIt for mine. Yes, I went through quite a few iterations before I managed to draw the layout I was after. Working on 2 levels with ramps inbetween was a 'challenge'. However, once drawn I was able to print out the layout (in many A4 sheets taped together) to transfer the layout onto the baseboards. Really handy for curves ...

 

My 2 timetables came from eBay for one and British Railway Books (https://britishrailwaybooks.co.uk/wtt/wtt.php) for the other. It's really just a case of searching online to see which ones are available. In my case the hardest part was finding 'which' timetable I needed for Burton-on-Trent. "Clay Cross to Barnt Green" wasn't an obvious correct answer! 

 

I'll be interested to see how your layout develops and builds.

 

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10 hours ago, ISW said:

Cameron,

 

Whereas you used AnyRail for your layout, I used 3rdPlanIt for mine. Yes, I went through quite a few iterations before I managed to draw the layout I was after. Working on 2 levels with ramps inbetween was a 'challenge'. However, once drawn I was able to print out the layout (in many A4 sheets taped together) to transfer the layout onto the baseboards. Really handy for curves ...

 

My 2 timetables came from eBay for one and British Railway Books (https://britishrailwaybooks.co.uk/wtt/wtt.php) for the other. It's really just a case of searching online to see which ones are available. In my case the hardest part was finding 'which' timetable I needed for Burton-on-Trent. "Clay Cross to Barnt Green" wasn't an obvious correct answer! 

 

I'll be interested to see how your layout develops and builds.

 

 

Just checked out your thread and I see what you mean by a challenge when it comes to software! I will keep an eye out for timetables, thanks for the suggestion.

 

Things will likely be quite slow from an update point of view for the time being, given the availability of materials etc. I'm also probably going to get the garage roof re-felted before I make a start, but again the current situation doesn't help. 

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Posted (edited)

 

623537665_TuptonJn.png.716a17ccdee6f39814d0779db91edd67.png

 

Thought it would help to draw up a track diagram to better explain the basis for 'Tupton Junction'. As I explained before, this layout will combine fiction with reality, as the location is based on Tapton Junction, just north of Chesterfield, but with a fictitious arrangement. The exchange sidings will bear some resemblance to those at Tupton to the south. The area between the blue lines is that which will appear on the scenic section of the layout. 

 

One interesting operational practice that took place at the real Avenue exchange sidings in the 70's was that of the arrival of trains from the south. Despite the physical connection from the down slow to the exchange sidings at Clay Cross North Jn, trains tended to run north pass the exchange sidings towards the original Avenue sidings, and then reverse across the up slow and back into the yard. Presumably this was to do with the signalling at the time, although later trains came in to the yard from the south. The loco's (usually Toton based 20's) would then run around the train, and take the brake van directly back south again towards Clay Cross, presumably to either Westhouses or Toton. I intend to simulate a similar operation on Tupton Jn. Trains coming from the Barrow Hill direction can run straight into the yard. However, trains coming from the south will have to run pass the yard and reverse back in via crossovers on the down / up Barrow Hill lines. This will add to the operational interest. 

Edited by Mophead45143
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Posted (edited)

image.png.c87306294d98e3a2dcac716bccc1c78f.png

 

Above is the locomotive roster for Tupton Junction as it stands. The idea is to portray a typical selection of motive power that might have be seen during a day in the Chesterfield area, and generally the sub class or depot allocation will dictate what trains they will pull. Naturally as they weren't very common, you wouldn't expect to see all of the 40's or 44's listed above in one running session, but having several differing examples will make each session more interesting. The class 20's from 044 - 208 in the upper section are old Lima models which will need some modifications if they are to remain in the fleet. These are some of the few loco's left from my father's original fleet. Loco's highlighted in green are, you guessed it, still carrying green livery!

 

Everything else will be fairly mundane livery wise, with a few exceptions (Union flag 47 164, and bulled up Melton Mowbray Pieman machine, 56 008). Other locomotives, while all carrying standard blue, will still have key detail differences that make them stand out from the rest. This is where research into the prototype is key. For example, even though all 6 of the 44's I have modeled are in standard blue, on research it can be seen that no two of them are identical. 44009 had a 45 style nose at the No.1 end and the differing grille style, 008 had welded over nose end doors, 007 had severe damage to its long body-side grilles, and 002, 004 & 005 all had varying quantities and positions of their numbers and OHLE warning flashes. 

 

Edited by Mophead45143
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2061883609_47164.jpg.3569655b2b82b4614bf318e9930a38fe.jpg

 

First workbench post for Tupton Junction, and its the only 'celebrity' loco in the fleet. Still requiring a light weathering, here is 47 164 in its bulled up Silver Jubilee livery. This is from the pack Bachmann released a few years back (I sold the Jubilee steam locomotive). Modifications as follows:

 

- Replacement battery boxes / water tanks sourced from Bachmann spares department (class 57 type originally fitted to this loco), and subsequently painted silver

- Buffer beam detail added and painted silver

- Replacement incorrect flags (as originally carried by the locomotive) soured from Precision Labels

- Rivets removed from window frames

 

The headboard is also from the precision labels pack for this loco and 47 163. I have just posed it with the loco for the photo, as it will unlikely be carrying this on the Harwich Parkeston Quay - Manchester Piccadilly boat train through Tupton Junction. Well, maybe on special occasions! 

 

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Posted (edited)

The 'Big' 16t Mineral project

 

To model the East Midlands in the 1970's requires a lot of mineral wagons & hoppers, to cater for all the coal and coke traffic in the area. I already have a vast collection, ranging from 16t minerals, 21t minerals & hoppers, 24.5t minerals and now thanks to Accurascale, 24.5t hoppers. In fact I did a thread on one way to create a 1973 rebuilt 21t Mineral, using a Parkside riveted kit as a basis: 

 

By far the most common type was the 16t mineral however. In my collection, I had 15 of the ancient Mainline/Replica models. While the body detail on these is good, there are two main issues that are particularly apparent when you put one next to a modern Bachmann model:

 

- The body is too long

- The chassis is poor

 

The easiest option would be to simply sell them on, as I wasn't going to live with them the way they were. However, where's the challenge in that?! 

 

The first problem (body length), is actually a reasonable representation of a smaller batch of the 16t minerals, which had a 10ft wheelbase, as appose to the usual 9ft. 394 of these were converted from redundant Palbrick wagons from 1975 - 1978. As ever, Paul Bartlett's excellent site gave invaluable information: https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/mineralmcv10ft.

 

That gave a prototype, but the chassis still needed replacing. Enter the 12t Vent Van (naturally...)

 

DSC_1130.JPG.2191ccdc59837f22c903fbbb2e558a98.JPG

 

For 6 of my Bachmann 12t Vent Vans, I wanted to replace the chassis to represent the 8-shoe clasp brake variant, using the excellent Red Panda kit (see image above). This meant I had 6 spare Bachmann Morton Push-brake chassis of 10ft wheelbase needing a home - perfect! For the other 9 16 tonners, four would receive Red Panda 8-shoe clasp brake chassis, and for the other five, Parkside Morton Push-brake chassis.

 

A summary of the required work is listed here:

 

- Chassis replacement

- Replacement buffers for Morton Push-brake examples

- Removal of top-flap door on all models

- Cutting bufferbeams short and adding gusset plates under stanchions (8 per wagon)

- Adding door 'banger's to solebar underneath side doors

- Repainting into BR bauxite and renumbering 

- Weathering!

 

 

 

Edited by Mophead45143
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DSC_1071.JPG.56b16a9af60f5b1f1f7cf42c17218345.JPG

 

Here are a few of the 10ft wheel base models in various stages of progress. All are fitted with the 8-shore clasp brake underframe. Note from the bottom to the top, I had forgotten to remove the top-flap door before adding the first coat of bauxite primer - d'oh!!! The bottom wagon is untouched, while the centre wagon has had this removed, and a new strip of plasticard added to continue the top frame. The wagon at the top has had this step completed. This was probably my least favourite part of the whole project, with all the cutting away of plastic on 15 wagons!  

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Posted (edited)

Finally the whole bunch was completed and various stages of weathering applied. Overall I am very pleased with how they have turned out, as they now match the standard of the rest of the wagon fleet. They will be equally at home both in coal trains and mixed freights.

 

DSC_1099_3.JPG.a8ffc0a68ca13c57e32eb2dd28a7c194.JPG

 

Edited by Mophead45143
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Very nice.

You can't have too many mineral wagons, although you've still got some way to go before Hasland sidings is full!

As I model the 60's/70's era I don't have the worry of rebuilt wagons and can build mine out of the packet.

How do you do your door bangers and gussets?, I still use the (fairly ropey it has to be said) Parkside provided efforts, and having been building minerals for a while now have quite a stash, but they are an easy way out, and once slathered in weathering they aren't too noticeable.

Keep us informed, I'm in!

 

Mike.

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Posted (edited)

Here are some further shots of some of these wagons on completion. 

 

DSC_1099.JPG.01fa5121f69007cfc595e81e58c1a5e4.JPG

 

First up, a pair of clasp brake (Red Panda chassis) examples in fairly reasonable external condition, those the one on the right is starting to show some blistering to its paint work.

 

DSC_1106.JPG.87b2d1ddcf5d4db054180a8e30fe23d7.JPG

 

Next, a pair of Morton push-brake examples in almost ex-works condition. The Bachmann chassis has been complimented by etched 10' WB tie bars from Cambrian kits. The replacement buffers for all the Morton braked examples came from Lanarkshire models. The closest match I could find to the prototype was actually code B051, an LNER pattern of all things! 

 

DSC_1125.JPG.1ef77db9eb026eda43f663bce714a3e9.JPG

 

Finally, a more work worn pair. The wagon on the right uses the Bachmann chassis, while the wagon on the left uses a Parkside underframe kit. A word of warning, these do not come with buffer beams, so I had to re-use these off some of the old Replica chassis, albeit with new buffers. 

 

Edited by Mophead45143
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Posted (edited)
32 minutes ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

Very nice.

You can't have too many mineral wagons, although you've still got some way to go before Hasland sidings is full!

As I model the 60's/70's era I don't have the worry of rebuilt wagons and can build mine out of the packet.

How do you do your door bangers and gussets?, I still use the (fairly ropey it has to be said) Parkside provided efforts, and having been building minerals for a while now have quite a stash, but they are an easy way out, and once slathered in weathering they aren't too noticeable.

Keep us informed, I'm in!

 

Mike.

 

Indeed! I probably have over 90 16t tonners alone mind! The rest are either Bachmann rtr or Airfix kits. 

 

The door bangers are spares from Parkside kits. I know some people don't like them but I have no issues. The gusset plates however were cut to shape from black card. 8 per wagon on 15 wagons, so 120 altogether - yawn......!!!!

 

Regards,

 

Cameron

Edited by Mophead45143
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Personally, I'd have gone for B004, but look at Paul Bartlett's site, the world is your lobster when it comes to buffer variations.

 

Mike.

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BR blue mid 70s layout, excellent.

Do you have a list of all stock you plan to run? I do like a roster, the loco plans are great

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4 minutes ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

Personally, I'd have gone for B004, but look at Paul Bartlett's site, the world is your lobster when it comes to buffer variations.

 

Mike.

 

I see what you mean, but I would argue the real ones are longer / thinner. See below:

 

https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/mineralmcv10ft

 

Cameron

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2 minutes ago, 37403 said:

BR blue mid 70s layout, excellent.

Do you have a list of all stock you plan to run? I do like a roster, the loco plans are great

 

image.png.cddf86948354d07ab0cb16b4cca09bdc.png

 

This is the loco roster (although 31 307 has since been changed to 308 in my plans!)

 

As for rakes, something in the order of:

 

Freight

 

1. Loaded Mineral (MDO, MDV, MEO, HUO, HTO, HTV etc.).

2. Loaded Mineral (MCO, MCV, HTO, HTV etc.).

3. Empty Mineral (MCO & MCV).

4. Loaded MGR.

5. Empty MGR.

6. Empty Coke (HCO & HCP).

7. Down Mixed (Toton - Tinsley).

8. Up Mixed (Tinsley - Toton).

9. Down Mixed (Bescot/STJ - Tinsley etc.).

10. Up Mixed (Tinsley - Bescot/STJ etc.).

11. Loaded BEV & BCV Bolsters (Scunthorpe ADJ etc.)

12. Loaded Ballast (Mermaid, Catfish, Dogfish, Sealion etc.)

13. Empty Spoil (Grampus, 5 planks, lowfits, highfits etc.)

14. Cement (PCA's).

15. Cement (Presflo's).

16. Oil (TEA's).

17. Oil (TTB's).

18. Freightliner (FFA's/FGA's).

 

Passenger / Parcels

 

1. Down Mk1 (NE - SW, Nottingham - Glasgow etc.).

2. Up Mk1 (NE - SW, Glasgow - Nottingham etc.).

3. Up Mk2a (NE - SW).

4. Down Mk2e/f (St Pancras - Sheffield).

5. Up Mk2e/f (Sheffield - St Pancras).

6. Parcels (BG's & GUV's)

7. Parcels (GUV's, BG's, CCT's & PMV's)

 

Definitely some shared storage roads required for shorter trains! The exchange sidings will also act as a scenic storage yard for the a chunk of the mineral traffic, to ease congestion in the off-scene storage yard!

 

Cameron

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Mophead45143 said:

 

image.png.cddf86948354d07ab0cb16b4cca09bdc.png

 

This is the loco roster (although 31 307 has since been changed to 308 in my plans!)

 

As for rakes, something in the order of:

 

Freight

 

1. Loaded Mineral (MDO, MDV, MEO, HUO, HTO, HTV etc.).

2. Loaded Mineral (MCO, MCV, HTO, HTV etc.).

3. Empty Mineral (MCO & MCV).

4. Loaded MGR.

5. Empty MGR.

6. Empty Coke (HCO & HCP).

7. Down Mixed (Toton - Tinsley).

8. Up Mixed (Tinsley - Toton).

9. Down Mixed (Bescot/STJ - Tinsley etc.).

10. Up Mixed (Tinsley - Bescot/STJ etc.).

11. Loaded BEV & BCV Bolsters (Scunthorpe ADJ etc.)

12. Loaded Ballast (Mermaid, Catfish, Dogfish, Sealion etc.)

13. Empty Spoil (Grampus, 5 planks, lowfits, highfits etc.)

14. Cement (PCA's).

15. Cement (Presflo's).

16. Oil (TEA's).

17. Oil (TTB's).

18. Freightliner (FFA's/FGA's).

 

Passenger / Parcels

 

1. Down Mk1 (NE - SW, Nottingham - Glasgow etc.).

2. Up Mk1 (NE - SW, Glasgow - Nottingham etc.).

3. Up Mk2a (NE - SW).

4. Down Mk2e/f (St Pancras - Sheffield).

5. Up Mk2e/f (Sheffield - St Pancras).

6. Parcels (BG's & GUV's)

7. Parcels (GUV's, BG's, CCT's & PMV's)

 

Definitely some shared storage roads required for shorter trains! The exchange sidings will also act as a scenic storage yard for the a chunk of the mineral traffic, to ease congestion in the off-scene storage yard!

 

Cameron

 

 

Great stuff. Really look forward to seeing this one develop....please keep us posted with your progress :dance_mini:

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12 minutes ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

Now you've got me confused!.

B004 and B051 are the same size.

 

Mike.

 

Sorry - they are the same length! But B051 is only ribbed on the sides which makes it look longer and thinner. I think they look more like what's on the 10' 16 tonners as I can't see that they have the ribbing on the top and bottom as on B004.

 

Cameron

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3 minutes ago, 37403 said:

Great stuff. Really look forward to seeing this one develop....please keep us posted with your progress :dance_mini:

 

As am I, although don't hold your breath as I've only just had a quote for redoing the garage roof this morning! Hopefully layout construction will actually start later this year! In the meantime, I'll try and upload workbench bits as and when...

 

To whet the appetite, here are a couple more wagons I snapped while doing the 16t conversions

 

DSC_1036.JPG.d0bd0f98396a8606ef300eb10d9943ce.JPG 

 

This is a standard 16t mineral which started off life as an unpainted Airfix kit, purchased off Ebay for 99p plus p/p!!! Bargain!!! I rebuilt the underframe to represent an 8-shoe clasp brake example and fitted replacement Oleo 2', 13" head buffers (Lanarkshire BP02). At one end these are in lime green primer, some wagons & loco's leaving works like this without a top coat of black!

 

DSC_1040.JPG.2c1c2c3bff35a992febf996c503e26a3.JPG

 

And one of Accurascale's excellent HUO 24.5t hoppers, weathered to more typical appearance. 

 

Cameron

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1 hour ago, Mophead45143 said:

Finally the whole bunch was completed and various stages of weathering applied. Overall I am very pleased with how they have turned out, as they now match the standard of the rest of the wagon fleet. They will be equally at home both in coal trains and mixed freights.

 

DSC_1099_3.JPG.a8ffc0a68ca13c57e32eb2dd28a7c194.JPG

 

These look great.

 

From memory the rebuilds were done at Horwich in the mid '70's and so were reasonably new at the time your layout is set, which is exactly how they look.

 

I've never had a problem with the Parkside door bangers either, so long as you glue them firmly to start with. I once did a rake of twenty of the 24t minerals - all those gusset plates drove me bonkers, but they do look the part when finished.

 

John.

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