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From OO to O in a garage - trackplan help please!


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  • RMweb Gold

Hi David,

 

I looked at a few small Welsh borders BLTs and they all seem to be quite well organised - or to put it another way a bit dull! (For instance, Kerry.) So I have added a dash of Hemyock into the mix and I think I have an interesting plan coming together. Hopefully, it will be realistic in terms of the basic features and operation even though it is quite compressed. I can use a few tricks to make it look more spacious than it really is.

 

I need a name for the station. Can you suggest something suitable?

 

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When I was planning my layout, Hemyock caught my eye as being just about perfect.  The creamery was an attractive feature.  Unfortunately, despite having 16' of scenic area I couldn't get it in.  I would have needed another 4'.

 

There is a layout article on Hemyock in MRJ 230 (2014), 4mm/EM, by Chris Lamacraft.

 

John

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3 hours ago, Harlequin said:

Hi David,

 

I looked at a few small Welsh borders BLTs and they all seem to be quite well organised - or to put it another way a bit dull! (For instance, Kerry.) So I have added a dash of Hemyock into the mix and I think I have an interesting plan coming together. Hopefully, it will be realistic in terms of the basic features and operation even though it is quite compressed. I can use a few tricks to make it look more spacious than it really is.

 

I need a name for the station. Can you suggest something suitable?

 

 

You could do worse than call it 'Rockfield' after the Welsh village near Monmouth with the famous recording studio...!

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  • RMweb Gold
Posted (edited)

Hi David,

 

Here is my idea for Rockfield:

grafarman8.png.686397e6ce6a2f18908a1b4c63037163.png

 

  • 1200mm swing bridge connecting to fiddle yard. Acts as headshunt for either station or FY.
  • The swing bridge would require a fairly precise and strong bit of engineering! The whole design stands or falls on being able to build that crucial device... It needs some counterbalancing and probably a mechanism to raise the bridge a few mils while it's moving.
  • Track plan combines simple Welsh practicality with a dash of Hemyock oddity.
  • The station is smaller than your original sketch - only one platform and three sidings. That's partly to make the plan less dense but also to be more appropriate for a small backwater station.
  • Run round loop away from platform for character. Long enough to run round 1200mm trains. After running round passenger trains they have to be propelled back into the platform.
  • Engine shed kicks back off the main line and lies in a cut with a wooded hillside rising behind it.
  • Correct trapping (I hope!) The catch/trap point in the run round loop must be curved so it needs to be modified, mocked up, ignored or scratch built.
  • There's one engine length between the bridge and the loop so locos can run round without using the bridge. The goods yard can probably be shunted without needing to use the bridge as a headshunt in most cases.
  • Platform and sidings longer than strictly necessary to give a sense of space when stock stands on/alongside them.
  • View blockers, usually trees, hide where things meet the backscene. A strategically-placed foreground tree helps to create a distinct countryside scene on the left.
  • The minor station feeling is also reflected in the goods yard where the goods shed is a small lineside affair and the ground level is raised to provide a loading bank.
  • The scenery is just a suggestion. I'm not sure about the arrangement of the elements in the goods yard. (No coal staithes - wagons are unloaded directly into carts or lorries.)
  • If the rock strewn field and the water in front of it (F2-H3) were abandoned there would be room for a kickback siding from the goods yard but I feel that would  be a step too far - too much station not enough landscape.
  • The access hole at A1-B2 might not strictly be needed but if it was covered with scenery the baseboards would be too wide to reach across. It might make some tasks easier at the back and it would give another angle for taking photos...
  • What have I forgotten? There's always something...

Here are the bare bones of the design:

1144673419_grafarman8trackonly.png.604594599669e8b28859ea4b64a5b9d7.png

 

I hope this gives you some useful ideas and if you don't mind I'd like to add this design to my trackplans album.

 

Edited by Harlequin
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  • RMweb Gold

Whatever you do,  if you can get away from setrack then it will look better in this space. Prototypical track with transition curves will improve the look a lot.  Try using templot, it's free to use.  Once you get your head around how it works, it's brilliant. And just because you use templot, doesn't mean you need to build your own track,  flexi and streamline points can still be used. 

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36 minutes ago, Harlequin said:

Hi David,

 

Here is my idea for Rockfield:

grafarman8.png.686397e6ce6a2f18908a1b4c63037163.png

 

  • 1200mm swing bridge connecting to fiddle yard. Acts as headshunt for either station or FY.
  • The swing bridge would require a fairly precise and strong bit of engineering! The whole design stands or falls on being able to build that crucial device... It needs some counterbalancing and probably a mechanism to raise the bridge a few mils while it's moving.
  • Track plan combines simple Welsh practicality with a dash of Hemyock oddity.
  • The station is smaller than your original sketch - only one platform and three sidings. That's partly to make the plan less dense but also to be more appropriate for a small backwater station.
  • Run round loop away from platform for character. Long enough to run round 1200mm trains. After running round passenger trains they have to be propelled back into the platform.
  • Engine shed kicks back off the main line and lies in a cut with a wooded hillside rising behind it.
  • Correct trapping (I hope!) The catch/trap point in the run round loop must be curved so it needs to be modified, mocked up, ignored or scratch built.
  • There's one engine length between the bridge and the loop so locos can run round without using the bridge. The goods yard can probably be shunted without needing to use the bridge as a headshunt in most cases.
  • Platform and sidings longer than strictly necessary to give a sense of space when stock stands on/alongside them.
  • View blockers, usually trees, hide where things meet the backscene. A strategically-placed foreground tree helps to create a distinct countryside scene on the left.
  • The minor station feeling is also reflected in the goods yard where the goods shed is a small lineside affair and the ground level is raised to provide a loading bank.
  • The scenery is just a suggestion. I'm not sure about the arrangement of the elements in the goods yard. (No coal staithes - wagons are unloaded directly into carts or lorries.)
  • If the rock strewn field and the water in front of it (F2-H3) were abandoned there would be room for a kickback siding from the goods yard but I feel that would  be a step too far - too much station not enough landscape.
  • The access hole at A1-B2 might not strictly be needed but if it was covered with scenery the baseboards would be too wide to reach across. It might make some tasks easier at the back and it would give another angle for taking photos...
  • What have I forgotten? There's always something...

Here are the bare bones of the design:

1144673419_grafarman8trackonly.png.604594599669e8b28859ea4b64a5b9d7.png

 

I hope this gives you some useful ideas and if you don't mind I'd like to add this design to my trackplans album.

 

 

Wow....!

Thank you; that looks really good, and yes feel free to use as you like.

I need to go and spend some time pondering now...!

 

David

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Must admit I couldn't quite visualise the 'swing bridge' idea myself before. That plan makes it very clear! What a great idea!!

Agree it would need to be very well engineered, though.

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  • RMweb Gold
Posted (edited)

Thank you!

 

I have posted a slightly revised version in my Album and the only significant change was that I moved the yard crane because I realised it wasn't in a very sensible place...

 

David: I can send you a PDF version that you can zoom in and examine in detail if that's of interest.

 

One thing I forgot to say was that I imagined a typical sequence of events for the history of this station: Independent company first builds the railway, later incorporated into the Cambrian, then the GWR and on into pre-Beeching BR ownership.

 

Edited by Harlequin
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Thinking about the mechanics of the swing-bridge, I believe things could be got to a point where the engineering wouldn't be too challenging, by using a clip-in rail, fitted only when it was being swung, to carry the outer end.

 

Such a rail, imagine old-fashioned, heavy-duty brass curtain track,  need not be curved, in fact it would be far better straight to avoid all sorts of unwanted turning moments - all that is needed is long rollers on the underside of the bridge , or a pair of double-flanged wheels free to slide along axles.

 

A bridge-deck made from a suitable aluminium extrusion would be strong and rigid enough, and could have cosmetic bits and pieces added to make it look like the real thing.

 

One key thing would be the need to register the positions of the main layout and FY 'island' tightly to one another so as to prevent even a tiny amount of relative movement. Fixing things to wooden shed walls or linings isn't good enough to ensure this (bitter experience with a large "bar flap" lifting section of layout!).

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On 18/08/2020 at 21:23, Harlequin said:

Thank you!

 

I have posted a slightly revised version in my Album and the only significant change was that I moved the yard crane because I realised it wasn't in a very sensible place...

 

David: I can send you a PDF version that you can zoom in and examine in detail if that's of interest.

 

One thing I forgot to say was that I imagined a typical sequence of events for the history of this station: Independent company first builds the railway, later incorporated into the Cambrian, then the GWR and on into pre-Beeching BR ownership.

 

 

Thank you, yes a pdf would be great - DM me please; and I like the bit of history...lots of potential! 

 

David

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  • RMweb Gold

Hi,

 

What a great solution to the problem that swing bridge is.

 

It has ignited a lot of ideas for me for my potential 7mm shed layout.

 

Simple but effective.

 

Regards,

James

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HI  every one , now this is a very good idea for a layout to  fiddle yard ,and save space,  it is just a thought, that  if the swing bridge piveted in the  middle  600 mm  the whole train could be turned round, before going into the  into the f/y  saving the points  - + also the balance of the bridge , may become easier to construct -  just ideas // - but this is one of the best i have seen /regards Dave 

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3 minutes ago, whizzo said:

HI  every one , now this is a very good idea for a layout to  fiddle yard ,and save space,  it is just a thought, that  if the swing bridge piveted in the  middle  600 mm  the whole train could be turned round, before going into the  into the f/y  saving the points  - + also the balance of the bridge , may become easier to construct -  just ideas // - but this is one of the best i have seen /regards Dave 

It's a possibility but there would be a couple of problems to overcome:

  • The scene would have to be wide enough for the bridge to sit convincingly in it when the bridge is "closed".
  • For full circle or even semi-circular rotation a lot of clear space would be needed around it, which would make the bit behind the pivot more difficult to disguise.

 

 

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A slightly simpler variation on the swing bridge idea, particularly for those with a linear or smaller space, would be to have a lift out cassette on the scenic running line (which could well be disguised within a bridge) which you swap with another one containing the next assembled train.

 

My only issue with the example above is that given you have a clear straight section for the swivel section beyond the end of a full run round loop, then by implication there was actually room for a traditional fiddle yard anyway. I'm keen to explore what can be done in as little as 13 or 14 feet where having it all scenic is very desirable.

 

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Lift-out cassettes are probably OK in 00, but get awfully unwieldy in 0, especially since the weight of the train, especially a loco, becomes significant.

 

Of course, if you limit the length, and thereby the train length, very tightly, it gets easier, but as I’ve said before, anything less than 1200mm in 0 gets very ‘bijou’. I’m building a FY in 0 currently that can only accommodate 940mm trains, so I’m acutely aware of this.

 

Why not open a thread posing your own brain-teaser for others to contribute?

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On 18/08/2020 at 21:08, F-UnitMad said:

Must admit I couldn't quite visualise the 'swing bridge' idea myself before. That plan makes it very clear! What a great idea!!

Agree it would need to be very well engineered, though.

The level of engineering depends on how you power the bridge. If you accept the need for the " big hand in the sky", a simple bushed pivot bolt and counter weight should do the trick. If however, you intend the bridge to float in the air propelled by hidden cables or motors, a substantial bearing structure will be required, probably sourced from a scrapped car. This is a really good idea and deserves developing.

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As it was a garage there should be scope for extending the tracks through the former doors into the garden or just the drive.  Ideally then most of the layout can be in the garden, or perhaps a giant traverser could travel between left and right hand baseboards. Perhaps not!

Screenshot (435).png

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  • RMweb Gold

It doesn't have to be a swing bridge. John Birkett-Smith has a similar sector plate on his Ashburton N gauge layout. But his is disguised as a length of cutting.

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