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Hi folks,

 

Could someone help me out with some info about the inside of a BR MK1 BG? 

 

I hope to model one with its doors open being loaded/unloaded. 

 

I hope to have pictures or a description of the floor. I imagine it to be distressed plywood or lino?  Also, any pics or info about loads would be great. Would BRUTE trolleys be wheeled on and off? 

 

Many thanks in advance. Here's progress so far...

20200509_211512.jpg.b064cd1d331ba413e7635b7b284944b9.jpg

Cheers for now,

Dave

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Great project, I think that BRUTEs were too big to fit in a BG. Mail and parcels were loose loaded, in later life when roller shutter doors were fitted the York trolleys were used and wheeled on/off via ramps.

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BRUTEs were designed to fit through standard size double doors on railway vehicles, and most certainly could and did fit in BGs, loaded and unloaded by the folding aluminium ramps kept at the stations.  Modelling the floor a dark grey and distressing it will give you the effect you want.

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37 minutes ago, rodent279 said:

Agree, I remember them well. Though I think some may have had wooden flooring at least partially.

From memory it certainly looks like concrete or some sort of composite material. The wooden flooring is found around the door openings and forms the floor edge that can be seen when the doors are open.

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9 hours ago, The Johnster said:

BRUTEs were designed to fit through standard size double doors on railway vehicles, and most certainly could and did fit in BGs, loaded and unloaded by the folding aluminium ramps kept at the stations.  Modelling the floor a dark grey and distressing it will give you the effect you want.

And having the odd broken footboard to reproduce of the damage done when a heavily loaded BRUTE was pushed out onto a station platform without using a bridging board

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1 hour ago, Goldhawk said:

From memory it certainly looks like concrete or some sort of composite material. The wooden flooring is found around the door openings and forms the floor edge that can be seen when the doors are open.

Yes, that's what I was thinking of. Didn't guards compartments have wooden floors as well?

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If you have access top a copy of the book Mk 1 Coaching Stock of British Railways (Parkin) there are some interior shots on page 30 (BG) and 31 (BSK)

 

Andy

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Edited by SM42
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The Parkin book indicates the floors were corrugated steel with 2" layer of bitumen, rather than concrete, but visually little difference.

 

Andy

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Quote from the Parkin book: "Luggage compartments had their floors made of corrugated steel sheet covered  with a 2in layer of bitumen. The doorways had renewable hardwood insets to take the brunt of loading damage"

 

David

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3 hours ago, The Stationmaster said:

And having the odd broken footboard to reproduce of the damage done when a heavily loaded BRUTE was pushed out onto a station platform without using a bridging board

And some bloodstaining on the platform where it's taken someone's toes off; steel toecaps were absolutely essential for platform work.  

 

3 hours ago, rodent279 said:

Didn't guards compartments have wooden floors as well?

Yes, IIRC, and I should; I've ridden in enough of them!  This is in and of itself no guarantee that I am right, though; it's a long time ago...  The guard's doors could be opened from the inside, but the loading doors couldn't.  Again, IIRC with the proviso, the inner guards compartment door was a slider, as were the security cage doors in vehicles where they were provided.  

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3 hours ago, westernviscount said:

Well chaps this is why i asked the question here!!! Bags of knowledge. I would never thave thought the floors were concrete @45125 but it seems there is a consensus. 

 

 

 

 

Concrete has a long history of use in rolling stock. At least some Great Central fish vans had concrete floors, presumably to facilitate washing out. I imagine that other companies did the same for the same reason.

 

In White's The American Railroad Passenger Car there's a photo of men laying a concrete floor in what's clearly, from the number and position of the windows, a passenger coach early in the twentieth century. It looks very much like men laying a driveway, with planks propped up above the work and a couple of men advancing along them with a wooden beam to level-off the surface.

 

Jim

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Yes @Jim Martin, i have never even considered it!! This is why i love this hobby. Through attempting to portray something in model form you end up learning something you might never have considered.

 

Many thanks Jim, i shall be googling railway and railroad concrete floors for a while still!! As @SM42 and @Kylestrome point out, the BG floor was bitumen. Now on to try and represent it!

 

 

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I have avoided the floor today but feel better armed to tackle this area. Thank you to all!!

 

Here are some snaps of progress so far. Still unfinished of course!!

20200516_160106.jpg.02b7df7f9b9cbb4690d62ad57ddbd086.jpg20200516_153601.jpg.a13331bbacbad8cfe519b553a723e2a6.jpg

 

Cheers for now.

Dave

Edited by westernviscount
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14 minutes ago, westernviscount said:

I have avoided the floor today but feel better armed to tackle this area. Thank you to all!!

 

Here are some snaps of progress so far. Still unfinished of course!!

20200516_160106.jpg.02b7df7f9b9cbb4690d62ad57ddbd086.jpg20200516_153601.jpg.a13331bbacbad8cfe519b553a723e2a6.jpg

 

Cheers for now.

Dave

Nice. Where did you get the BRUTE trolleys from?

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I will check later but I have a few spare still on the etch in their original packet. They are up for grabs as I am moving up to 7mm.

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28 minutes ago, 37114 said:

I will check later but I have a few spare still on the etch in their original packet. They are up for grabs as I am moving up to 7mm.

Interested, if you do have some spare!

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The 2 LNER TPO vehicles at the GCR, POT (1931) and POS (1937) both have concrete floors and a nice 3-4' wide strip of coconut matting down the middle

to try and keep the guys feet warm.

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Don't forget to remove the external steps (bar the bottom one) on the coach ends! They were removed due to OHLE to prevent fatalities. It's one of the faffs in adapting maroon Bachmann MK1's if you want to model late 60's with flashes. Hey ho! 

 

Great work though! 

 

Regards 

 

Guy

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33 minutes ago, balders said:

Don't forget to remove the external steps (bar the bottom one) on the coach ends! They were removed due to OHLE to prevent fatalities. It's one of the faffs in adapting maroon Bachmann MK1's if you want to model late 60's with flashes. Hey ho! 

 

Great work though! 

 

Regards 

 

Guy

That's an annoyingly accurate observation there Guy :-) 

 

My instinct is to set about them immediately with the chisel knife but a reflective ale is always in order before flying at these things. 

 

Good call though Guy and thank you. This is why we share here...its not all about transmitting, we need to receive also. 

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