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Chandwell - N Gauge 1990s city viaduct


Chandwell
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Hi Michael,

Very nice work. I do not like layouts built on flat baseboards with track laid directly upon it because everything is level and there is nowhere for water to run to (if it was real) and would immediately flood with the slightest rain. Even in 'flat' areas such as the Fens the tracks are mostly built above the landscape (in this case to prevent flooding). With your layout being built well above the flat datum you can incorporate slopes and multiple 'levels' both above and below track level, result a real looking model.

I tried to achieve similar effects with Shirebrook but my datum was the track base... that is the only flat and level part of the model everything else is rising (or falling) to some degree.

Your buildings are impressive and look entirely correct for the area modelled.

Cheers

Duncan

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The station looks superb Michael. Well done and definitely worth the hours put in. As others have said the gentle slopes but with the level windows works really well. The clock tower looks suitably imposing enough to represent the sort of railway folly so common from that era. And as usual the attention to detail with the VCTB, the cafe and all the signs, posters etc really makes the difference. 
 

I’ll look forward to the videos when they’re ready. 

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  • 5 weeks later...

So now that the station is complete, I am turning my attention to a low relief Victorian hotel behind the station. This is based on the really interesting, incredibly rambling, and massive Midland Hotel at the entrance to Bradford Forster Square station.

 

This will be an exercise in interestingly intricate roofs, hexagonal towers, domes, terraces, arches, chimneys, and fancy wrought ironwork (Err... Or not...).

 

This is the cereal packet mock up of the build. It's already taken 32 hours over 25 days to get this far but I am ready to make a start on the building itself tomorrow evening.

 

It has 124 individual window/door openings. I will be using the Sticky Label technique for every window frame. It's going to be a long job, but I can't wait to get started.

 

20210616_133153377_iOS.jpg.97b7562d55bed250e26b5efaa67f60af.jpg

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I'm not generally an N scale fan but this is fantastic, the attention to detail and level of realism in such a small scale is brilliant. 

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10 hours ago, Chandwell said:

 

It has 124 individual window/door openings. I will be using the Sticky Label technique for every window frame. It's going to be a long job, but I can't wait to get started.

 

 

Why not use Scene-setters glazing grids - they come in a range of sizes/pitches and are quick and easy to use. This building, that I scratch-built in N/2mm scale and, as yet, incomplete, is based on a real building and has over 70 windows all formed from the glazing grids:

 

DSC_9197red.jpg.ad19f824289639337c611ce0e6d4652b.jpg

 

 

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3 hours ago, grahame said:

 

Why not use Scene-setters glazing grids - they come in a range of sizes/pitches and are quick and easy to use. This building, that I scratch-built in N/2mm scale and, as yet, incomplete, is based on a real building and has over 70 windows all formed from the glazing grids:

 

DSC_9197red.jpg.ad19f824289639337c611ce0e6d4652b.jpg

 

 


That’s one lovely building! Beautiful work. 

 

The reason I use the sticky label method is two fold:

 

I actually enjoy it!

 

And most importantly, I can get all 124 windows onto a quarter of a sheet of sticky label and a bit of old birthday cake box, which will cost me a total of just over one and a quarter pence. And everything on Chandwell is done at absolute rock-bottom pricing!

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  • 2 months later...

Hi Michael

 

I've just spent 45 minutes pounding away on the exercise bike while watching your hotel build on YouTube. It's really fantastic stuff! I think that the backs of buildings are often more interesting than the fronts; and the Royal Scot is a marvellous hotch-potch of styles (not to mention that modelling the back allows us to enjoy the allure of Buffers nightclub). I don't have a YT account, so I  can't subscribe to your channel, but I'll definitely be watching your other videos and following this topic.

 

Jim

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  • 2 weeks later...

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