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Baeseler slip type DKW

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A question has cropped up on the Templot forum about the Baeseler double slip that Roco and Tillig make. Has anyone hand-built one, are any plans avaialble to make one in HO?

 

These slips seem to be used quite a bit on the continent but not in the UK. I'd like to try making one just for the fun of it! It's the sort of slip where the 2 slip roads don't actually cross each other, they share a common centre rail.

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Hi, I have previously used the Tillig TT scale 12mm gauge Baeseler DKW (out of the box - no assembly required):

 

DKW.jpg.78b334bc264098ab95265adb21e54f93.jpg

 

Found it to be a bit of a pig - very fiddly. I later changed to Hoffmann point motors but still never got it working 100% reliably, which is a pity as it's a nice-looking piece of trackwork.

 

 

 

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On 31/05/2020 at 05:18, TT-Pete said:

Hi, I have previously used the Tillig TT scale 12mm gauge Baeseler DKW (out of the box - no assembly required):

 

DKW.jpg.78b334bc264098ab95265adb21e54f93.jpg

 

Found it to be a bit of a pig - very fiddly. I later changed to Hoffmann point motors but still never got it working 100% reliably, which is a pity as it's a nice-looking piece of trackwork.

 

 

 


hi

 

i have used one of these, it is switched by 4 point motors and the small link between each track tie bar was removed. I found there was to much slack leaving it in place so not all blades of the point would sit firmly against its rail. Also all electrical connections was cut on the underside as certain trains would short at slow speed due to back to back being an issue. So all connections to these track sections are now controlled by relays 

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On 04/07/2020 at 09:49, Andymsa said:

i have used one of these, it is switched by 4 point motors and the small link between each track tie bar was removed. I found there was to much slack leaving it in place so not all blades of the point would sit firmly against its rail.

 

Now that is very interesting, it was exactly that problem that absolutely drove me to distraction! No matter how I adjusted the motors there was always at least one blade that would not be sitting firmly in place. Get that one sitting properly, then a different one would be slack, get one side working ok, the other becomes slack - repeat ad nauseam. In the end I just gave up.

 

I really like your idea of cutting the tie bar and using 4 motors as that way each pair of blades can be independently adjusted, were you using latching or stall point motors? In fact I may even go and salvage the turnout from the eBay fodder box where it has been discarded in the garage and give it another go...

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I have had a lot of trouble with Tillig turnouts. The problem is related to the fact that the blades are so thin that they start to twist because the tiebar pushing the switch rail out of shape. The original Tillig plastic tiebar simulates the pullrod, but it leaves a little distance between the tiebar and the  switch rail. I have been using wooden coffee stirrers that were carved in shape. It is important to keep the original stirrer thickness below the swithc rails.

Furthermore, I found that only a parallel movement of the throw mechanism works. I did never succeed with mechanisms like servos or tortoise. The original Tillig mechanism has actually a parallel motion.

Michael

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, TT-Pete said:

 

Now that is very interesting, it was exactly that problem that absolutely drove me to distraction! No matter how I adjusted the motors there was always at least one blade that would not be sitting firmly in place. Get that one sitting properly, then a different one would be slack, get one side working ok, the other becomes slack - repeat ad nauseam. In the end I just gave up.

 

I really like your idea of cutting the tie bar and using 4 motors as that way each pair of blades can be independently adjusted, were you using latching or stall point motors? In fact I may even go and salvage the turnout from the eBay fodder box where it has been discarded in the garage and give it another go...

 

I use tortoise motors, sometimes I offset the motors so they are not directly under the tie bars, this is normally due to track feeders. I also use the single slip version, I did have some issues with stalling on the point due to a back to back short but this has been resolved by cutting all links that supply power to the rails. Although this does result in a lot of track feeds but gives 100% reliability.

 

another advantage of offsetting is the distortion of the tie bar as mention in the previous post.

 

another thoughts occurs, sometimes I replace the wire with a slightly stiffer wire and I try get equal throw from the center point this does mean sometimes the motor will be offset from the center point unless I use the wire in tube method to further offset the motor. 

Edited by Andymsa
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Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, michl080 said:

I have had a lot of trouble with Tillig turnouts. <snip> I did never succeed with mechanisms like servos or tortoise. The original Tillig mechanism has actually a parallel motion.

 

Michael, is that H0 or TT turnouts? I originally tried to use the Tillig Unterflur-antrieb for TT turnouts but found the instructions very difficult to understand, diagrams are easy but Tillig just give a mass of text which assumes you can identify a component from what it is called and know how they go together...  I looked on the web but unfortunately couldn't find any videos or articles of how people have fitted them, so I gave up and have used Mole (as in the picture above), Tortoise and Hoffmann motors without problems instead (apart from the Baeseler).

 

22 hours ago, Andymsa said:

I use tortoise motors, sometimes I offset the motors so they are not directly under the tie bars, this is normally due to track feeders.<snip> another advantage of offsetting is the distortion of the tie bar as mention in the previous post. another thoughts occurs, sometimes I replace the wire with a slightly stiffer wire and I try get equal throw from the center point this does mean sometimes the motor will be offset from the center point unless I use the wire in tube method to further offset the motor. 

 

Andy, I think I'll probably try the Hoffmann motors again, the actuating arm sticks out the sides of the motor so the body already sits offset from the centre point, so it would be possible to have two side-by-side operating in tandem but independent of each other...

 

Peter

 

hoffmann.jpg.a9c5c1f5679559b05777227e0e6ee1c0.jpg

 

 

Edited by TT-Pete
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