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Class158

Lima Class 47 modifications

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Ok I have got a Lima class 47 and am planning to replace its motor 

(see above about that topic)

 

anyway I’m thinking about modifying it and would like some tips/inspiration (without converting to DCC) 

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There's someone selling the various underframe components on eBay

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Posted (edited)

Keep the old motor parts. Much prefer Lima motors as one can see what one is doing when servicing them. So nice to work on. Todays motors tend to be difficult to open up.  

Replacing the Lima motor for a modern can motor does give a much smother ride, but it is a trade off as Lima motors have torque, so ensure it is a can motor designed for stronger applications. (If you wanted it to power a lightweight railcar then even the motors designed to power CD's will be fine).

Other then that, go for it! It will be interesting to see the results. :) And you will never know if it is a success or not unless you try it! 

One of my locos has a Lima class 09 chassis, but if I change the motor I may as well have a go at building my own chassis which I have not tried yet.

 

 

Edited by Mountain Goat

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The only Lima models i have now  are 1 class 33 and  3 class 73's. All have been fitted with CD motors 4 years ago . No problems as yet with them . Now they can run nice and slow.   :o I think it's time for the class 33 to be replaced with one more Heljan class 33.

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Could I buy buffers for the class 47 if yes please tell me where to buy them! (P.s I am an OO gauge modeller )

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, crompton 33 said:

The only Lima models i have now  are 1 class 33 and  3 class 73's. All have been fitted with CD motors 4 years ago . No problems as yet with them . Now they can run nice and slow.   :o I think it's time for the class 33 to be replaced with one more Heljan class 33.

What is their pulling power like? Can they handle an 8 to 10 coach train ok? I ask because I have a Lima motor on one of my 7mm narrow gauge locos.

Edited by Mountain Goat

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32 minutes ago, Mountain Goat said:

What is their pulling power like? Can they handle an 8 to 10 coach train ok? I ask because I have a Lima motor on one of my 7mm narrow gauge locos.

5 coaches only . But i've done away with the traction tyres. As they are now  all fitted with Ultrascale wheels.   I have not put extra weight in them as i can only get a 4 car in the station.

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No problem. Ultrascale wheels are lovely, but the model needs more weight to compensate for the lack of grip to pull more. Is ok for shorter trains though. Class 33 makes perfect sense as the prototypes tended to be found on 4 to 6 coach trains when they came down here. I never saw them pull more then 6 coaches unless they were double headed. Maybe others have seen them pull more in flatter areas of the country? 

I have only ever once seen a real class 73 and it had come to Cardiff Canton to get its wheels turned as I was told that was cheaper to get them done there then in other areas of the country. Te class 73's are quite narrow looking things! The one I saw was heading east between Cardiff and Newport on the long stretch... The only place in Wales which I know to have a length of quadriple track system that are not classed as sidings. It was running light. 

The other surprizing DEMU that I saw in Cardiff... Well, I was waiting to work the rather busy 1721 service to Maesteg on a saturday. It was also a rugby day at Cardiff though the rugby fans were heading into Cardiff to watch the match rather then heading away. I was waiting for my train which was normally a single class 143 or possibly a 150 (Back then the 142's were not long in Wales and at first only the Cardiff Valleys Lines traincrww had signed them.  I signed the 142's later when my depot staff got to learn them. (Main difference for us were the cabs and the different position of the switches).

Anyway. That day the 1721 was late as Cardiff Central platform staff were doing all they can to clear things as all those extra passengers getting off were delaying other trains behind. 

Now it was getting for 20 minutes late so I was starting to get concerned as if it was too late we would have a struggle to make up time for the journey back from Maesteg, as we only had a 15 minute turnaround on that service, part of which involved contacting the signalman. 

So anyway... I was waiting on platform 3 as that is where we were told it would be, and then to my amazement, in came a DEMU number 1001 as a 4 car set. I had never seen one before. I did not even know they still exist! It was a surreal sight as it was almost dark and drizzly in early winters day and the yellowy glow from the coach lighting... After my initial amazement, I thought "I can't work this without a guard to act as a pilotman (I am trying to remember if that was the right term to use). Basically if one guard (Same for the driver) had signed the route, and another guard had signed the unit (Train) then one was allowed to work the service between you with the guard whos service it would have been taking overall charge. However everyone left the train and there had been about 20 Wales and West staff (The company I worked for) all in brand new uniforms (Rare) and none of whom I had ever seen before (Also rare). 

Luckily behind it we had a class 143 waiting to come in behind it. That was our Maesteg service.

 

A few weeks later I happened to have the managing director of the company, Chris Gibb ask permission to come on my train. I liked Chris because he was always good to talk to and he was very welcoming. I asked about the DEMU. He said "Funny that you say that. Do you know I contacted every company and every preserved line I could to see if anyone anywhere had spare coaches or something to use for an extra service as they were expecting a lot of extra passengers due to the rugby, but as elsewhere in the country there was another game on the same day (Football?) number 1001, the Southern DEMU set was the ONLY train of any sort abailable. There was nothing else, not a single coach left in the country for that day... The extra staff were hired just for that one event to help close the doors. It was a memory that has stayed with me to this day. 

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17 hours ago, Mountain Goat said:

Keep the old motor parts. Much prefer Lima motors as one can see what one is doing when servicing them. So nice to work on. Todays motors tend to be difficult to open up.  

Replacing the Lima motor for a modern can motor does give a much smother ride, but it is a trade off as Lima motors have torque, so ensure it is a can motor designed for stronger applications. (If you wanted it to power a lightweight railcar then even the motors designed to power CD's will be fine).

Other then that, go for it! It will be interesting to see the results. :) And you will never know if it is a success or not unless you try it! 

One of my locos has a Lima class 09 chassis, but if I change the motor I may as well have a go at building my own chassis which I have not tried yet.

 

 

 

I've added up the cost of the bits listed on another post, comes to around £27 I think.

It all depends what you want your locos to do, if they're for a small end to end depot layout or similar where slow running is required then perhaps it's worthwhile. If however you're looking for locos to work for a living stick with the Lima. 

Most of my class 76s for Deepcar use Lima western mechs with plenty of weight added. My dual fitted pairs only have one motor bogie, they can handle 20 odd original Hornby HAAs, with quite reasonable slow starting and stopping, they have had minimal servicing over the near 30 year exhibition life of the layout and still going strong.

I also have some 87s (also weighted) used on our Carstairs layout, that had a steep slope into the fiddle yard, with 8or 9 MK2 or 3 coaches behind you could watch the traction tyres twisting on the wheels.

One thing to be wary of is if you're using Lima locos to pull heavy trains always have the power bogie at the rear, that way the pull is directly on the power bogie otherwise you can get it tending to lift slightly causing stuttering.

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37 minutes ago, Class158 said:

They’re sold out. Anyone know any other place to buy them?

I have a set of 4 Lima class 47 buffers, theyre in grey if you dont mind that

 

NL

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