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Florence Locomotive Works

British built or designed locos in North America

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Kerr Stuart (yep, it really is). FC oriental mexicano

 

bl711.jpg

 

Im1904EnV98-p540.jpg

One of them is preserved on a plinth.

pue208.jpg

 

There were quite a few english locos in mexico (often of more typical british outline!), plus a load of these used on the Veracruz line until electrification in the 1920s:

Fairlie-1.jpg

 

Also plenty in canada, like this hunslet:

440px-Prince_Edward_Island_Railway_Engin

 

Or the montreal electrics (Beyer Peacock/English Electric):

9186.jpg

 

If you want the US itself, here is some typical rio grande narrow gauge on the Veta Pass:

mountaineer_denver_and_rio_grande_small.

 

Courtesy of vulcan foundry...

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1 minute ago, brack said:

Kerr Stuart (yep, it really is). FC oriental mexicano

 

bl711.jpg

 

Im1904EnV98-p540.jpg

One of them is preserved on a plinth.

pue208.jpg

 

There were quite a few english locos in mexico (often of more typical british outline!), plus a load of these used on the Veracruz line until electrification in the 1920s:

Fairlie-1.jpg

 

Also plenty in canada, like this hunslet:

440px-Prince_Edward_Island_Railway_Engin

 

Or the montreal electrics (Beyer Peacock/English Electric):

9186.jpg

 

If you want the US itself, here is some typical rio grande narrow gauge on the Veta Pass:

mountaineer_denver_and_rio_grande_small.

 

Courtesy of vulcan foundry...

That’s the first time ive seen a photo of the Mexican double fairlies, I had heard of them though! That Hunslett is nice also.

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There were some earlier, smaller ones too:

 

Mexican_Railway_0-6-6-0_Fairlie_locomoti

 

Ferrocarril_Mexicano,_Fairlie_Locomotive

 

default.jpg?highlightTerms=

 

The mexicano and the fc interoceanic were british owned and originally headquartered in london, which might explain some purchasing decisions.

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10 minutes ago, brack said:

There were some earlier, smaller ones too:

 

Mexican_Railway_0-6-6-0_Fairlie_locomoti

 

Ferrocarril_Mexicano,_Fairlie_Locomotive

 

default.jpg?highlightTerms=

 

The mexicano and the fc interoceanic were british owned and originally headquartered in london, which might explain some purchasing decisions.

Funny how that works.

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Vancouver Hunslet....

 

02-135a.JPG.6eab69ddd4afffc87d505fe10b774e25.JPG

 

CN (Ex Montreal Harbours Board) English Electrics (as the photo in an earlier post doesn't appear to work..)

 

91-120a.JPG.84288467ba9db7754bd183e47674db2a.JPG

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A bit more info on the broad gauge engine. It’s from the Great Western Railway of Canada, and is broad gauge. Designed by an apprentice of Brunel from what I can find, who also built the first loco with a steel boiler for the same company.

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1 hour ago, Florence Locomotive Works said:

A bit more info on the broad gauge engine. It’s from the Great Western Railway of Canada, and is broad gauge. Designed by an apprentice of Brunel from what I can find, who also built the first loco with a steel boiler for the same company.

 

Though to be clear (given the large UK audience on here), the GWRoCanada broad gauge is different than GWR broad gauge.

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I’m sure this thread has happened before, so worth searching.

 

In the meanwhile, look up “Stourbridge Lion”.

 

Canada had so many British locos and railcars that you could go on forever there!

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Stourbridge Lion - well the replica with as many original bits as they could find is at:

http://www.waynehistorypa.org/page/s-lion

 

And from that beginning the Delaware and Hudson Railroad grew and was so captivating I couldn't help but model it! 

Jason

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7 hours ago, jasond said:

Stourbridge Lion - well the replica with as many original bits as they could find is at:

http://www.waynehistorypa.org/page/s-lion

 

And from that beginning the Delaware and Hudson Railroad grew and was so captivating I couldn't help but model it! 

Jason

 

Not very easy to photograph in their museum, but a couple of photos from 2011 here....

 

11-2945.jpg.1bd6307093db904fef46ea01c4ce465b.jpg

 

11-2948.jpg.9c1447dfc842dc996915e2bc148e321b.jpg

 

There are some original parts from the Lion on display in the B&O Museum in Baltimore - the boiler being the largest section still surviving.

 

The other key edarly British built loco in the USA is the John Bull, which has a prominent display position in the Smithsonian in Washington DC..

 

16-1628.jpg.d5df1bf2b7dab1be0437abd12b4f0dcd.jpg

Edited by Johann Marsbar
Addl photo
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That bridge is interesting too - it looks very like a structure that was built for the Stockton & Darlington.

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3 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

That bridge is interesting too - it looks very like a structure that was built for the Stockton & Darlington.

Eventually found this reference to it on the Smithsonian website....

The bridge on display is a section of the first iron railroad bridge built in the United States. Constructed in 1845, the bridge carried coal-hauling trains of the Philadelphia & Reading Rail Road across a small creek near West Manayunk, Pennsylvania. Because the railroad threatened to take business away from the Schuylkill Canal, angry boatmen had been making futile attempts to sabotage the competition by burning its wooden bridges. Iron was an unusual and expensive choice for a bridge, but it was stronger and longer-lasting than wood, faster to erect than stone, and fire-resistant. It ushered in a new era of engineering.

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2 hours ago, Florence Locomotive Works said:

There are of course the Hackworth engines in Nova Scotia, lots of photos on the internet.

Feel free to share links :)

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23 hours ago, jasond said:

Stourbridge Lion

Must admit I thought "British locos in the USA" was Stourbridge Lion, period!! (or Full Stop if we're to the right of The Pond).

I didn't know there were some others as well.!!

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I'd forgotten this one which I came across in the NC Museum of Transportation. Obviously a replica, the original was built by C.Tayleur & Co at the Vulcan Works in 1836 for the Raleigh & Gaston Railroad........

 

12-2757.jpg.3ffc7b2413566485d6c2eb2132de2ff7.jpg

 

 

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And then, there is the replica of the "Dorchester", a Stephenson product from 1836 for the Champlain & St Lawrence line in Canada, which lives at Exporail in St Constant, PQ....

 

7-558.JPG.56ba326f6aac81a8cd6f80213ab138be.JPG

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It's always a relief, or maybe a regret when I post something based on dusty stuff at the back of my memory and no-one has a laugh and sets me straight!  Stourbridge Lion was the first English built steam loco in the USA, but was too heavy for the wood with iron straps on top rails then in use on the D and H Canal Co system.  By the time the company decided to sell it, American builders had started making the regular design we know, not the vertical cylinder type originally made.

 

It was treated as useful scrap and the boiler made it to the Smithsonian in Washington and eventually to the B&O museum in Baltimore, where it was used in an event organised by the B&O to celebrate a 100 years of railroads.  I saw this reincarnation there some time before the museum suffered bad damage in a storm and now the museum's inventory doesn't appear to include it.  

 

The Wayne County museum, close to the original D&H rail line, has a replica on display.  Is this the ex-B&O Museum exhibit, relocated because the B&O Museum focussed on ... yes, you guessed ... the B&O after the museum repairs?  Or is it the replica built by the D&H for its 150th birthday train that toured the system in 1973, complete with a fine selection of HO models of its steam locos, prototypes hardly ever produced for modellers (a 4-8-4 and a 4-6-6-4).   It's on the second car, behind those BEE-YOO-TEE-FUL PAs!

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2172111

 

Sorry, must stop rambling, got a Kadee to respring before lunch!

Jason

 

 

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2 hours ago, jasond said:

It's always a relief, or maybe a regret when I post something based on dusty stuff at the back of my memory and no-one has a laugh and sets me straight!  Stourbridge Lion was the first English built steam loco in the USA, but was too heavy for the wood with iron straps on top rails then in use on the D and H Canal Co system.  By the time the company decided to sell it, American builders had started making the regular design we know, not the vertical cylinder type originally made.

 

It was treated as useful scrap and the boiler made it to the Smithsonian in Washington and eventually to the B&O museum in Baltimore, where it was used in an event organised by the B&O to celebrate a 100 years of railroads.  I saw this reincarnation there some time before the museum suffered bad damage in a storm and now the museum's inventory doesn't appear to include it.  

 

The Wayne County museum, close to the original D&H rail line, has a replica on display.  Is this the ex-B&O Museum exhibit, relocated because the B&O Museum focussed on ... yes, you guessed ... the B&O after the museum repairs?  Or is it the replica built by the D&H for its 150th birthday train that toured the system in 1973, complete with a fine selection of HO models of its steam locos, prototypes hardly ever produced for modellers (a 4-8-4 and a 4-6-6-4).   It's on the second car, behind those BEE-YOO-TEE-FUL PAs!

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2172111

 

Sorry, must stop rambling, got a Kadee to respring before lunch!

Jason

 

 

 

The one in the museum in Honesdale would appear to be the 1932 built D&H replica....

https://www.american-rails.com/lion.html

From memory, the last time I visited the B&O museum, back in 2009, the original boiler and some other parts were on display in the museum, but as an unassembled selection of odd components.

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Buffers in north America!  When and why did they go for buckeye coupl0?

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A rather nice Ruston in Canada;

21235.jpg

Jim Parker collection.

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