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Whatever is the Klein world coming to,lol. GER, 4mm scale AND aircraft as well! Whatever next???

 

Sincerely Chris, whatever you model in I know it will be good and I for one will follow what you do with great interest. Hobbies are for enjoyment and sometimes we all need a change to keep us engaged and our projects fresh. 

 

Happy modelling and I look forward to seeing progress on all your projects.

 

Rod

 

 

 

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On 21/07/2020 at 21:39, steveNCB7754 said:

 

Hi Chris,

 

Post-war FAA aircraft are an interest of mine as well.  Before I got the railway modelling 'bug' again, I had previously returned to my first 'love' (aircraft modelling) but now in 1:48 scale (so nearly O-Scale!), rather than the 1/72 kits of my childhood/youth.  My aim was to build the aircraft used by the FRU/FRADU (Fleet Requirements Unit/Fleet Requirements & Air Direction Unit) out of Hurn (now Bournemouth Airport) and NAS Yeovilton -  I lived in Poole at the time.  Did not get many done, but the ones I completed, appeared here;

 

http://hsfeatures.com/features04/seahornetf20sn_1.htm

 

http://hsfeatures.com/features04/seahawksn_1.htm

 

http://hyperscale.com/2010/features/tsr2whatif48sn_1.htm

 

 

The latter (the last model I completed) is a 'What-If' diversion of course!  I also reviewed several books about FAA aircraft that came out at the time, on the same website (won't put the many links here, you can find them on the site if interested).  Still have a pair of Canberras (one to be a target tug, the other to be an RAE example in 'Raspberry Ripple' scheme) packed away in a box, partly completed.  I may go back and finish them one day, if I get the chance.

 

Sorry this is all a bit 'off topic', I am nevertheless looking forward to seeing this new layout of yours, develop.

 

 

Regards

Steve

 

Steve,

That Hornet is a beauty.

 

I am binge watching "Sailor" from 1976 on Youtube. Here is a great little compilation from Youtube. There is a tantalising view of a Skyraider near the end. The music from "Mutiny on the Bounty" and "1492 The Conquest of Paradise" by Vangelis suits it well.

 

The MD of one of the companies I worked for flew Scimitars in the early 1960s - I congratulated him on his survival. 

 

Regards,

 

Chris K

 

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15 hours ago, wessy said:

Chris,

I would certainly recommend trying 5mm foamboard. So long as it is sufficiently braced and I think includes a certain amount of strip wood at the corners, it works well. I have built a couple of small layouts using it - both in the mainstream scale of 5.5mm:foot. I liked the way things went together quickly and easily and were easy to modify.

SDC11708.JPG

 

Wessy (hope that's ok), could you take a photo of the underside of this layout? What are the dimensions?

 

Regards,

 

Chris K

 

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1 hour ago, 81A Oldoak said:

Steve,

That Hornet is a beauty.

 

I am binge watching "Sailor" from 1976 on Youtube. Here is a great little compilation from Youtube. There is a tantalising view of a Skyraider near the end. The music from "Mutiny on the Bounty" and "1492 The Conquest of Paradise" by Vangelis suits it well.

 

 

Thanks.

 

The Scimitar is/was also on my list to do, but I think we are all (still) waiting for an injection-molded example in 1/48 scale (rather than the now aging vac-form that was/is available).  Obviously, for a Scimitar, you also need several 1/48 scale, old style, metal dustbins to collect all the oil drips coming off the airframe!

 

Steve

 

 

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The first baseboard frame for Cwm Fawr is completed. It is 9mm plywood with 20mmx25mm stripwood cleats. Dimensions are 122cms x 54cms (48” x 21”). Weight is 2.4kgs. The top surface will be 6mm ply. Parts are ready for the second board. Meanwhile, the scratchbuilt signal box is progressing and I have just built a Y point. Another three points need to be built.

 

“On, on” as the Hash House Harriers cry.

 

Regards,

 

Chris K

 

Baseboards_2_Cwm_Fawr.jpg

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Thoroughly enjoyed the video of the carrier and its crew and watching the planes take off and land in short space. I wonder how many times they had to practice before they got it right. Landing on a moving deck is< I am sure< a highly skilled task and one not to be taken lightly.

 

Like your first baseboard - looks a nice job. 

 

Rod

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8 hours ago, 81A Oldoak said:

 

Wessy (hope that's ok), could you take a photo of the underside of this layout? What are the dimensions?

 

Regards,

 

Chris K

 

Chris,

Unfortunately I can't take a photo as I demolished the layout about three years ago. However, the following may help. I have attached another photo of the layout on a floor where the tiles were 12"square.

 

I used 5mm foamboard for all the main structure, although some small section timber was later added to the rear of the back scene as it was rather fragile for moving to an exhibition. For the same reason, some timber (off cuts of Skirting board) was used at the front to give some support to a cover. This was definitely more timber than was really needed and must have added about 1/3 to the weight of the layout.

 

The dimensions were approximately 48" by 15" - foamboard encourages a relaxed attitude to dimensions!  There was then a 15" 'fiddle stick' at the end. The main structure was built rather like your plywood boards. Sides and cross members of about 4" at 15" spacing gives plenty of strength and diagonals can be added as desired. I found that two helped to prevent any twist. All gluing was done with a hot glue gun. The sides and ends were then overlaid by another layer of the foamboard cut to profile and also one to act as a back scene. Point control was by rod and micro switch via holes in the fascia as shows in the picture.

 

I think that the key things are to use it like plywood but don't be afraid to laminate layers or use butt joints. Also if it doesn't feel strong enough, just keep adding the foamboard as it will add almost nothing to the weight. One thing to think about is how to protect the layout - something I did not do adequately at first hence the added timber. An alternative is to keep the thing in a box. I did this with a small 5.5mm diorama/inglenook layout which fitted into a storage box from Ikea. Here it is, all 26"x10"x12".

 

The whole exercise was very enjoyable and relaxing so my suggestion would be to just try something out and play around with the concept.

 

Best wishes,

Tim Birch

DSC_0208.JPG

DSC_0554.JPG

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14 hours ago, wessy said:

Chris,

Unfortunately I can't take a photo as I demolished the layout about three years ago. However, the following may help. I have attached another photo of the layout on a floor where the tiles were 12"square.

 

I used 5mm foamboard for all the main structure, although some small section timber was later added to the rear of the back scene as it was rather fragile for moving to an exhibition. For the same reason, some timber (off cuts of Skirting board) was used at the front to give some support to a cover. This was definitely more timber than was really needed and must have added about 1/3 to the weight of the layout.

 

The dimensions were approximately 48" by 15" - foamboard encourages a relaxed attitude to dimensions!  There was then a 15" 'fiddle stick' at the end. The main structure was built rather like your plywood boards. Sides and cross members of about 4" at 15" spacing gives plenty of strength and diagonals can be added as desired. I found that two helped to prevent any twist. All gluing was done with a hot glue gun. The sides and ends were then overlaid by another layer of the foamboard cut to profile and also one to act as a back scene. Point control was by rod and micro switch via holes in the fascia as shows in the picture.

 

I think that the key things are to use it like plywood but don't be afraid to laminate layers or use butt joints. Also if it doesn't feel strong enough, just keep adding the foamboard as it will add almost nothing to the weight. One thing to think about is how to protect the layout - something I did not do adequately at first hence the added timber. An alternative is to keep the thing in a box. I did this with a small 5.5mm diorama/inglenook layout which fitted into a storage box from Ikea. Here it is, all 26"x10"x12".

 

The whole exercise was very enjoyable and relaxing so my suggestion would be to just try something out and play around with the concept.

 

Best wishes,

Tim Birch

DSC_0208.JPG

DSC_0554.JPG

Very helpful, Tim. Plenty to think about. I think whatever I do will be a winter project.

 

Regards,

 

Chris

 

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Chris,

One thing I forgot to mention was that the foam blunts blades quite quickly.  after not much use, the blade may be sharp enough to cut the card facing but will begin to pull on the foam and not give a tidy edge which makes gluing more difficult and the joins less accurate.

 

Best wishes,

Tim Birch

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  • 4 weeks later...
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For those finding this thread in the future, it seems appropriate to link to the Obituary thread for Chris Klein.

 

Chris helped me on a couple of O gauge projects, a gentleman through and though who was happy to help.  Thoughts with his family and friends, but also with Chris Bastin at Minerva.

 

RIP Chris

Edited by MarshLane
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