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7 hours ago, SteveyDee68 said:

With thanks to John M Upton and Gwiwer, it appears these particular coaches are well outside my chosen era for modelling!  


I am guessing that the land-cruise trains are a thing of the past, and that these coaches no longer exist?  Although if they are not full of asbestos like the MK1 sleepers, I suppose they might be more easily used by preservation societies/heritage lines for staff/volunteers to bunk down in?

 

Steve S

 

2833 is still in use with WCRC and 2834 is at dean forest. Being the last lot of BCKs (and last Mk1 day coaches) built - and that most of the lot survived - then they probably did not have asbestos.  For preservation they have the advantage/disadvantage of being delivered as air braked / electric heated.

 

With the number of spare Mk3 sleepers from the Scottish sleepers available then I am not certain if there is a particular call for these.

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Many years ago before the Bachmann Sleeper came along, I did a Frankenstein job using the roof and sides from a Hornby one inserted into a Bachmann Mk1 chassis and ends plus the ducting.

 

It looked all right...

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14 hours ago, John M Upton said:

Many years ago before the Bachmann Sleeper came along, I did a Frankenstein job using the roof and sides from a Hornby one inserted into a Bachmann Mk1 chassis and ends plus the ducting.

 

It looked all right...

But if it only ran at night who would ever notice :jester: 

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Scanning some slides last night and I came across a journey I made in 1978 in a Mk 1 sleeper.  It was from Stranraer to Euston and the train left Stranraer over 2 hours late due to the connecting ferry being late. However, the train was early into Euston.  Running at speed to get back on time made the ride so bad I was unable to sleep.  Happy days.

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That subject comes up every so often - generally the Sleeper services were timed for 75mph max. for comfort but were authorised up to max. line/stock speed when required.

As you found, the timings were generous enough to allow recovery for arrival time but at the expense of getting some kip!

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44 minutes ago, keefer said:

That subject comes up every so often - generally the Sleeper services were timed for 75mph max. for comfort but were authorised up to max. line/stock speed when required.

As you found, the timings were generous enough to allow recovery for arrival time but at the expense of getting some kip!

I had thought it was 80mph though the difference would have been minimal.  

 

Quite recently I had a very late start from Paddington on the 23.45 to Penzance.  A train I have used (or its equivalent) regularly since 1967 and Mk1 Western-hauled days.  On this occasion the stock was positioned in Platform 1 as normal but the usual 22.30 boarding was not permitted.  There was an engineer's possession outside the station requiring the train to be shunted out and set-back into platform 2.  OK we thought, a slightly late boarding but away in time.  Not so.  The loco failed outside the station and required depot assistance to be coaxed back into life.  We eventually departed at 01.53.  With a faster than normal run and having used up almost all of the slack in the schedule which includes an hour's stand at Exeter St. Davids we were into Plymouth a few minutes early.  Poor rail conditions then saw us lose over an hour slipping and creeping through Cornwall but that's another story

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 30/06/2020 at 20:00, Ken.W said:

 

Almost, the compartment partitions were mid-way between each window.

 

All had the same body design. First class compartments had a single bed, Second class a twin bunk, both to the plain wall side of the compartment, top bunk frame roughly level with the bar of window vent and ladder in the middle. The sink was in the corner under the window, quadrant shaped and with a lid that looks like would double as a table. A large rectangular mirror was mid-way on the wall opposite the beds. The attendants compartment was the non-toilet end one.

Compartment windows had horizontally sliding shutters.

 

There's good pictures in the Parkin Mk1 book if you can access a copy.

 

 

Agree it probably was a case of 'Why?' The most you would normally see of a sleeper interior would be either the corridor wall, or the window shutters, depending on which side.

 

Sounds right on liveries, they didn't first appear until after Crimson/Cream had ceased, and their Mk3 replacements appeared in Blue/Grey

 

I used these sleepers about four times a year between 1970 and 77 when travelling between Truro and Paddington when I was in the Merchant Navy. I don't know if is was official or not, but that's exactly what they were used for by the steward. He placed the tea and biscuits on them when giving the morning call.

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On 31/07/2020 at 14:36, coronach said:

Here’s another Hornby sleeper with Comet sides. Still got some finishing to do. 

45E0B42B-80D9-40DF-A324-DE9A7D521C94.jpeg

And the other side pre glazing and proper fitting

4E9955B7-3F8F-4975-A671-57A7577C85B0.jpeg

Edited by coronach
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  • 1 month later...

I use a drill bit of the same size turned in my fingers  just enough to get the lip off the rivet. pulls out quite easy . Fitted Replica Commonwealth Bogies with Bachman Cranked MK2 mini couplings glued to it. Only problem is that the Bogie mounts are to close to the end of the coach and should be slightly more in board than they are.  Well worth the time or a little project to do. Ill try and get some pics later of both Hornby and some detail shots of the Bachmann model.

 

 

Cheers Trailrage

Edited by TRAILRAGE
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On 01/08/2020 at 20:50, coronach said:

And the other side pre glazing and proper fitting

4E9955B7-3F8F-4975-A671-57A7577C85B0.jpeg

Nice! Have you flush glazed or are the brass sides thin enough to still look good with glazing behind them?

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couple of shots of my old Hornby ones for my boy. MJT Buffers, Replica bogies. one of these was started for a Royal Train conversion but that was put on hold after SWMBO bought me the Bachmann Model. Replica Bogie has a Bachmann Cranked MK2 Mini coupling fitted by removing the Tails from the box and using a 2 part Araldite to stick it to the stub of the original coupling mount. You also have to cut down the Tail of the Coupling itself as well. 

IMG_0637.JPG

IMG_0638.JPG

IMG_0639.JPG

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8 hours ago, TRAILRAGE said:

Queen of Scots MK1 Sleeper looking just a tad tatty!

2110 Carnforth

 

Equally sad to see is the LMS 12-wheel sleeper on the right, which is in at least as bad condition.  I know WCR keep all these coaches for spares (bogies and brake gear mostly) but it would be nice if some of them had been covered by a tarpaulin for at least some of the last 20 years.  Here's another, photographed there in late 2012:

100_2297.jpg.e1a01dd3c63b558024892bc79c13617f.jpg

Edited by Northmoor
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On 25/09/2020 at 12:24, Phil Bullock said:

Nice! Have you flush glazed or are the brass sides thin enough to still look good with glazing behind them?

It is simply flush glazed with plastic stuck behind the sides, which are very thin.

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