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Shalfleet Quay, Isle of Wight 1927-35.


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15 minutes ago, LBSC123 said:


Hi @Ribird, the S100 was purchased from a friend, he doesn't model pre-BR but had previously purchased this. The recent Model Rail sale around Warley encouraged him to move this one onto me, and purchase a lovely BR Green one. 

I must say you've done a lovely job with your one, the weathering looks cracking! I'll be interested to see how your future conversions go. With regard to the circle on the smoke box, was that fitted to all of the locos? I wasn't sure if it was to do with which US company built them? 

Thank you for the compliments on the weathering! As you can see, one of my buffer steps broke off at some point, but I don't know when!

 

Regarding the circle, all of them received it as built (regardless of the company) and kept it until around BR, which then had the usual BR smokebox plate added. The book I have, does what they were for and what SR then used them at Southampton, but I'm not home atm. I will update this in about 3-4 hrs with why those were there. One feature that has been lacking with modeling these, is that they had two lengths of screwlink couplers, depending on what route they were taking at the docks. The NCB S100's were directly bought from WD. The book I keep mentioning is "The Story of the Southern USA Tanks" by H Sprenger.

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Enjoying and admiring this a lot. 
 

I agree on Hatton v Hornby coaches. I’ll be going for Hattons for my twinkle in yo eye after 2 other projects IOW branch.

 

Go on add a platform, somewhere for the visitors to the New Inn to stagger to on the way back to Newport.

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For answering above instead of editing the post: the circle on the front of the S100 was used to display the US Army Transportation Corps roundel (or how Bachmann has it, the loco number) and then  sometimes the duty number during SR days (instead of using a headcode disc). Not all locos had that for the whole time, as there are very few pics of them missing. Also two different length 3 links, not screw links used.

 

It was 4326 that retained WD USA livery until BR (got my numbers switched). Several of the S100s were loaned to the GWR as well, but dates and numbers are not said. 

Edited by Ribird
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  • 2 weeks later...

Had the chance to do a bit more work on the layout, and spent my time focussing on the Thames ahead of the rigging. I covered the two hold areas with some tarpaulins fashioned out of Tunnocks wrappers. 
1DD0DC13-7FA1-47A4-A6DB-1F88A80D54F8.png.ae7c33b8746ba9a17dae83f2008a1ecd.png


 

CFAD8974-EB12-466F-810E-6922DC71101A.jpeg.d8a0637f891e2e290f0183bdca19518d.jpeg

 

I think they look good but this means I’m running out of excuses for not doing the rigging. So today’s project is to find a Thames barge to use as a point of reference.

 

More soon. 

 

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On 29/12/2020 at 20:11, LBSC123 said:

I've also been working on a Thames Barge, which can be seen below. I'm not far off painting this, but need to do some work on the rigging. Any ideas on this greatly appreciated! 


 

 

I found that upholstery thread is strong and yet flexible. I used Gutermann's mid brown  CA 02776 on my Highbridge wharf SDJR coasters.

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5 hours ago, phil_sutters said:

I found that upholstery thread is strong and yet flexible. I used Gutermann's mid brown  CA 02776 on my Highbridge wharf SDJR coasters.


Thanks @phil_sutters, I’ve got some 0.25mm Rigging thread which I hope will do a similar job!

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A few shots of a Thames Barge (or similar) found on the Thames today. Although it might not be quite right, it has helped iron out some questions I had on how various bits were attached to each other. 
 

I’ll soon be taking the plunge on the model. I’ll warn everyone now that, for my sanity’s sake this will just be a representation of the rigging, and might not be quite right from a sailing point of view... 


EB018322-5B82-4284-9527-5630530923C2.jpeg.2e723ec7ec48528bd031763906efa3d0.jpeg

 

7DB028CB-CAA5-4C58-8483-9C514A59215A.jpeg.52fefe4e10ae7ef7ac8658c13e576089.jpeg

 

C43B9775-DB44-4ED3-8B15-F9FC50C9A74A.jpeg.9d41b177f7fddc5284ec802cdb4f6c40.jpeg

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5 hours ago, LBSC123 said:

Had the chance to do a bit more work on the layout, and spent my time focussing on the Thames ahead of the rigging. I covered the two hold areas with some tarpaulins fashioned out of Tunnocks wrappers. 
1DD0DC13-7FA1-47A4-A6DB-1F88A80D54F8.png.ae7c33b8746ba9a17dae83f2008a1ecd.png


Prefer the plain chocolate version, Yum.

Ray

 

 

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I didn't realise there was a plain chocolate version @wainwright1, these ones are far too sweet for me so I've delegated the responsibility of emptying the wrappers to my housemate. Perhaps I'll have to look for the plain chocolate version next time... 

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Looking at the full-sized mast, it tapers towards the top. I used paint brush handles to reproduce the taper. I always have a few brushes that I haven't cleaned properly and allowed to go hard.  I never throw away potential materials.

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If I may LB, although overall it looks great and is nicely convincing, there are a couple of small things on deck that stand out as not quite right. They're also relvant to getting the thing rigged :) Additions in green, deletions in red:

Capture.png.90adcc009dd657abace152daf81b954f.png

 

1. Foresail sheet horse - a great lump of wood, octagonal or round, around which the clew (bottom back corner) of the foresail (the sail at the front!) lashing goes, which acts as a sheet (rope t control the angle of the sail relative to the fore-and-aft line of the boat.

2. Main sheet horse - a dirty great lump of wood etc etc etc although the sheet block hooks in to an iron ring around the horse.

3. Crab winches - these are used to raise and drop the leeboards

4. Not seen many of those there... :)

 

To save any more words, some pics old and new. They're high-ish res so worth opening in new tab and zooming in:

the-masters-and-mates-of-two-thames-sail

It's the main sheet horse acting as a footstool. You can also see the crab winch between the navy bloke's hands and Capt Nonchalant's shin.

 

men-on-a-thames-barge-south-bank-lambeth

The same is visible on this barge and her neighbour (between the puppy and the man sitting - also showing the iron ring on to which the mainsheet block hooks)

 

bargee-will-everard-and-the-second-crew-

Foresail sheet horse visible lower right and left, behind the winch

 

thames-sailing-barge-outside-the-royal-d

For general arrangement, a photo of a rather tired barge. Main horse is obvious, the forward one half-hidden behind the watermark

 

Perhaps most usefully, three views of Blue Mermaid (built 2019 and well documented so a handy source :)) which show it all fairly well:

IMG_6624a.jpg

BM-by-Simon-Wakefield-0920.jpg

BM-first-sail-4.jpg

 

Sure you've got it all in hand, but thought I'd mention these distinctive barge features. You're on to a winner going to look at the real thing though :) 

 

All the best, loving the updates!

 

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2 hours ago, LBSC123 said:

I didn't realise there was a plain chocolate version @wainwright1, these ones are far too sweet for me so I've delegated the responsibility of emptying the wrappers to my housemate. Perhaps I'll have to look for the plain chocolate version next time... 

Available in Sainsburys.

Ray

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44 minutes ago, Schooner said:

If I may LB, although overall it looks great and is nicely convincing, there are a couple of small things on deck that stand out as not quite right. They're also relvant to getting the thing rigged :) Additions in green, deletions in red:

Capture.png.90adcc009dd657abace152daf81b954f.png

 

1. Foresail sheet horse - a great lump of wood, octagonal or round, around which the clew (bottom back corner) of the foresail (the sail at the front!) lashing goes, which acts as a sheet (rope t control the angle of the sail relative to the fore-and-aft line of the boat.

2. Main sheet horse - a dirty great lump of wood etc etc etc although the sheet block hooks in to an iron ring around the horse.

3. Crab winches - these are used to raise and drop the leeboards

4. Not seen many of those there... :)

 

To save any more words, some pics old and new. They're high-ish res so worth opening in new tab and zooming in:

the-masters-and-mates-of-two-thames-sail

It's the main sheet horse acting as a footstool. You can also see the crab winch between the navy bloke's hands and Capt Nonchalant's shin.

 

men-on-a-thames-barge-south-bank-lambeth

The same is visible on this barge and her neighbour (between the puppy and the man sitting - also showing the iron ring on to which the mainsheet block hooks)

 

bargee-will-everard-and-the-second-crew-

Foresail sheet horse visible lower right and left, behind the winch

 

thames-sailing-barge-outside-the-royal-d

For general arrangement, a photo of a rather tired barge. Main horse is obvious, the forward one half-hidden behind the watermark

 

Perhaps most usefully, three views of Blue Mermaid (built 2019 and well documented so a handy source :)) which show it all fairly well:

IMG_6624a.jpg

BM-by-Simon-Wakefield-0920.jpg

BM-first-sail-4.jpg

 

Sure you've got it all in hand, but thought I'd mention these distinctive barge features. You're on to a winner going to look at the real thing though :) 

 

All the best, loving the updates!

 

Thanks for the pointers @Schooner, I’ve taken them on board! 
 

This is the result of tonight’s progress, not perfect and still in need of a bit of tidying up, I also need to work out how to make the sails, which will be furled, I’ve got a few ideas on that to follow...

 

I’ve had to make a fair few compromises for my own sanity! I don’t know how ship modellers do it!

 

I’ll post some more photos tomorrow when sunlight is on my side.

 


4F043F0A-A9A6-4AB6-9FCC-DB89F9053531.jpeg.8a00b66e3b1ba547a0c116e1d2a28fb1.jpeg

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A photo taken in daylight to show the rigging more clearly. I’ve still got to add the foresail which will be furled, alongside the sails for the main and mizzen masts. 
 

It’s fair to day if I ever build a ship again it will be one without a mast and rigging! 
 

CB9B70B2-C815-4CB0-BEAA-AC9BCE58C7FF.jpeg.619008a9ae7cbda477c104ebbb7d796a.jpeg

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16 hours ago, phil_sutters said:

Looking at the full-sized mast, it tapers towards the top. I used paint brush handles to reproduce the taper. I always have a few brushes that I haven't cleaned properly and allowed to go hard.  I never throw away potential materials.


Certain chop sticks can make good masts as well.

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Worth listening to Dick Durham on Thames Barges. He was the mate on the last working Thames Barge. Thankfully your time period means the barge should be in better condition. You do know the barges were typically sailed by two men and a dog?

 

 

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35 minutes ago, D-A-T said:

Worth listening to Dick Durham on Thames Barges. He was the mate on the last working Thames Barge. Thankfully your time period means the barge should be in better condition. You do know the barges were typically sailed by two men and a dog?

 

 


Thanks, this looks very interesting. I wasn’t aware it was 2 men and a dog... I’ll have to model them for sure!

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Hi  LBSC123.

 

There is/was a sailing barge museum down at Kemsley on Milton Creek, fairly close to the Sittingbourne and Kemsley Steam Railway. Visited it quite a few years ago. They did have a couple of barges under restoration and a small museum building with some very interesting displays on the barges and other local industries including especially brick making, with strong links to the area in London where I live.

 

Definitely worth a visit if it is still going.

 

All then best

Ray

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