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Shalfleet Quay, Isle of Wight 1927-35.


LBSC123
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44 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

What's the plan for the lighting, LB ? 

 

Good question @NHY 581. I've made things a little harder for myself on account of designing it so that two sides of the the layout are the viewing area and the other two have backscenes, this means I in effect have a free standing corner without support at the front of the layout.

 

 

IMG_9296.jpg.b43df1aba1e68f2aa8e5e57d78103564.jpg

 


The current plan (about version 13?) is to use some appropriate aluminium L-angle for the lighting. At the right hand end of the layout this will be L shaped, one leg attaching down the back of the layout, held by bolts tightened into captive nuts in the soft wood at the back of the layout, the other leg will extend out to above the front right hand corner. I'll then run a piece of Aluminium L angle from the front left corner along the front to connect to this. Hopefully this will be light and strong enough to prevent it sagging. These will be bolted together and have two strips of LED strip on them.

 

This was used to great effect on my first lockdown project as seen below.  

 

IMG_5472.JPG.7ff00f19b016ea4723b235ddd4453158.JPG

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Just had a read through your thread and got to say what a fantastic layout you're building. I love the scenery and the quayside looks superb, I'm looking forward to seeing more pics. 

I'm really impressed with the fact you've built it in a flat too! 

All great stuff. 

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11 hours ago, sb67 said:

Just had a read through your thread and got to say what a fantastic layout you're building. I love the scenery and the quayside looks superb, I'm looking forward to seeing more pics. 

I'm really impressed with the fact you've built it in a flat too! 

All great stuff. 


Thanks for the kind words, there’s still plenty of detailing work to do, but I don’t think it’s panning out too badly. 
 

I must confess I built the baseboards back at my parents, although there’s no reason I could built them in a flat (the fiddle yard will probably be built here), but yes, that’s come with its own challenges too!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've finally received all of the necessary supplies for the construction of the water and have undertaken a satisfactory test of resin using acrylic paint as a tint.

Expect a more comprehensive update shortly on either the satisfactory completion of the pour or how I lost the deposit for this flat!

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That looks very good. Can't determine how deep the coat is yet though.

 

Is it possible to add wave detail using that material, or perhaps you would use another type of product.

 

On St Mellion I coloured the sea bed using various acrylic paints until I got what I thought was a good mixture of colours and then used about four coats of polyurethane yacht varnish. I found that with this I could use a 1 inch wide flatty brush to make the wave pattern as the varnish started to go off, also added a little white to make the areas of foam where it hit the quay. Your material looks very clear, possibly clearer that the varnish, although ours does not look bad and gives very good reflections especially of our Clyde Puffer.

 

All the best

 

Ray

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That looks brilliant. I've been following your progress on this for a while now and I think you're doing a splendid job. I know that bit of the island and you've certainly captured the feel of the place. Really looking forward to seeing further developments.

 

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Thanks all for the kind words about the resin pour! 
 

To answer @wainwright1’s question about depth, it’s only about 5mm deep at the most. 
 

 I didn’t really plan to go down the whole ‘deep pour’ as I have previously mentioned I wanted to model the layout at low tide. I built in a lip about 5mm high at the front of the layout to contain the resin (with the benefit of hindsight I think this was a bit of a mistake, but hey ho). As a result you can’t really see any of the water depth. 
 

I’ll consider using some sort of Woodland Scenics water effects for the waves, but I quite like the subtlety of Mod Podge Gloss as per Luke Towan.

 

Here’s a ‘on scene’ shot to show what sort of look I am going for.

 

EC9DB22D-9DB2-432E-BDA8-A00445190B4A.jpeg.80b291e35cbad2a3f0e8c5088e74c1ea.jpeg 

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Looking great, I would second the part about everything being a good learning curve as I am finding out. Thanks for your kind words but really the lbsc open kits from cambrian and a few vans from smallbrook would be the majority of the stock for your quay and well within your skills. After that im sure you'll enjoy making a few one-off bits of stock.

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Lovely little layout! Living in Cowes as a child, we'd often go for walks along the 'round the island' path, especially at blackberry-picking time, and I remember getting along to Newtown Creek a few times - the prototype photo above certainly brings back a few memories, though doesn't really get across the huge expanse of mud you get there at low tide!

 

Kudos to you for going for such a large expanse of water too!

 

The only thing that jars just a little is the buffer stops - they look too modern for the Island railways, which tended to use hand-me-downs for almost everything (and indeed still does!). IMHO some semi-derelict ex-LBSCR ones would be more in keeping.

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1 hour ago, TeakDB said:

Looking great, I would second the part about everything being a good learning curve as I am finding out. Thanks for your kind words but really the lbsc open kits from cambrian and a few vans from smallbrook would be the majority of the stock for your quay and well within your skills. After that im sure you'll enjoy making a few one-off bits of stock.


Thanks @TeakDB, hopefully you're right but I'm far more adept with scenery than wagons, but hopefully nothing that a bit of practice won't sort out. I'm currently working on a Smallbrooks LBSC Van which I started a long time ago, I'm hopeful this will prove to be a useful test bed for future wagons further down the line. 

 

20 minutes ago, Nick C said:

Lovely little layout! Living in Cowes as a child, we'd often go for walks along the 'round the island' path, especially at blackberry-picking time, and I remember getting along to Newtown Creek a few times - the prototype photo above certainly brings back a few memories, though doesn't really get across the huge expanse of mud you get there at low tide!

 

Kudos to you for going for such a large expanse of water too!

 

The only thing that jars just a little is the buffer stops - they look too modern for the Island railways, which tended to use hand-me-downs for almost everything (and indeed still does!). IMHO some semi-derelict ex-LBSCR ones would be more in keeping.


Thanks @Nick C for the kind words. I'm glad someone else has picked up on the buffer stops too, they are just the Peco bullhead affairs, I did look at some of the Lanarkshire Models ones at the point of building the layout, and tried comparing them to the (very limited) photographs of island buffer stops I could find, I wasn't 100% sure on what would be a suitable prototype and so opted for the Peco ones as an interim. They are on my list to replace eventually, once I settle on the appropriate type to replace them. 

 


This is the Lanarkshire LBSC one: 
819185860_ScreenShot2020-12-16at19_49_19.png.d1d07f197d6f1c74ab0ac16a134c9a32.png

 

 

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59 minutes ago, D602bulldog said:

Hi im thinking of using foamboard dont the card separate or bubble up when using the water/pva method  for ballasting i would not be using cork underlay.

 

thanks  

 

Not sure if Foamboard is made of card or plastic. If it is plastic it should not cause any problems. If it is card, I would do a trial piece to see how it reacts.

 

I have ballasted track on three layouts and have not used anything under the track. I believe that the idea of putting cork under track is to help reduce noise from the trains running on the rails, but if you then ballast the track using granite chips and PVA, the glue solidifies the cork and negates its purpose. If you ballast just with the chips, your can form quite an effective shoulder using a strip of thin card or plasticard to shape it,  then whet it using a garden spray with a couple of drops of washing up liquid (yellow not green), then apply a semi dilute PVA glue solution, also with a couple of drops of washing up liquid. Make sure it spreads throughout the whetted ballast.  Do be careful when ballasting around points and do it in stages leaving the bits where the working parts are to last, applying  just the right amount of ballast where you need it and a limited amount of glue with a dropper, so you do not have too much glue running around the works.

 

Ray

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29 minutes ago, LBSC123 said:


Thanks @TeakDB, hopefully you're right but I'm far more adept with scenery than wagons, but hopefully nothing that a bit of practice won't sort out. I'm currently working on a Smallbrooks LBSC Van which I started a long time ago, I'm hopeful this will prove to be a useful test bed for future wagons further down the line. 

 


Thanks @Nick C for the kind words. I'm glad someone else has picked up on the buffer stops too, they are just the Peco bullhead affairs, I did look at some of the Lanarkshire Models ones at the point of building the layout, and tried comparing them to the (very limited) photographs of island buffer stops I could find, I wasn't 100% sure on what would be a suitable prototype and so opted for the Peco ones as an interim. They are on my list to replace eventually, once I settle on the appropriate type to replace them. 

 


This is the Lanarkshire LBSC one: 
819185860_ScreenShot2020-12-16at19_49_19.png.d1d07f197d6f1c74ab0ac16a134c9a32.png

 

 

 

Mikes Models, (Available from Holt Model Railways I think), used to do a range of buffer stops in whitemetal. Not sure if they still do them or if they do a type which would suit your purpose.

 

Ray

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23 minutes ago, LBSC123 said:


Thanks @TeakDB, hopefully you're right but I'm far more adept with scenery than wagons, but hopefully nothing that a bit of practice won't sort out. I'm currently working on a Smallbrooks LBSC Van which I started a long time ago, I'm hopeful this will prove to be a useful test bed for future wagons further down the line. 

 


Thanks @Nick C for the kind words. I'm glad someone else has picked up on the buffer stops too, they are just the Peco bullhead affairs, I did look at some of the Lanarkshire Models ones at the point of building the layout, and tried comparing them to the (very limited) photographs of island buffer stops I could find, I wasn't 100% sure on what would be a suitable prototype and so opted for the Peco ones as an interim. They are on my list to replace eventually, once I settle on the appropriate type to replace them. 

 


This is the Lanarkshire LBSC one: 
819185860_ScreenShot2020-12-16at19_49_19.png.d1d07f197d6f1c74ab0ac16a134c9a32.png

 

 

 

The clearest photo I can find is this one from Flickr - there's another that looks the same at the end of the coal siding at Cowes, but the photo I've got for that doesn't have copyright info on so I can't post it. Both show what appears to be two rails vertically, and two forward diagonals, with relatively steep rear diagonals - which going by other photos online, I reckon are LSWR ones.

 

c.1958 - Ventnor, Isle of Wight.

 

 

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22 minutes ago, Nick C said:

 

The clearest photo I can find is this one from Flickr - there's another that looks the same at the end of the coal siding at Cowes, but the photo I've got for that doesn't have copyright info on so I can't post it. Both show what appears to be two rails vertically, and two forward diagonals, with relatively steep rear diagonals - which going by other photos online, I reckon are LSWR ones.

 

c.1958 - Ventnor, Isle of Wight.

 

 


Yep, I think you're right about that being an ex LSWR one. I'll do some further research and see if I can collaborate this with other photos I've seen. Thanks! 

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Buffers was something that was vaguely on my horizon aswell so I've looked through all the books I have tonight.

 

Now in the the 50s onwards i've found (so far) 4 early SR bufferstops, some rebuilt with sleepers instead of wood for the beam. Considering the SR didnt produce a standardised buffer untill around 1928 i think for both our time periods it would probably be a bit out of character to get brand spanking new bufferstops. Now I think I can identify lbscr buffers at ventnor in the 30s after the turntable was removed and horringford on the IWCR pre grouping, I also a view of one of the buffers at a siding in bembridge in the 30s is a lswr buffer. To confuse matters further I think the carriage siding at Brading had an earth mound contained by timber as the bufferstop in the 30s. 

 

Looking at your backstory for shalfleet with a relaying of track in 26/27 I think it'd be most likely for lbsc or lswr buffers to be used- im currently erring more towards lbsc due to seeing one used when relaying a bit of ventnor in the early 30s. Im so far thinking about using these for Brading unless I find anything to the contrary.

 

Additionally since yours was originally a private concern like the FYN you could of hodgepodged any old thing and the SR may of just left it in place or added a new stop on it so really it could be anything- It also means like the FYN you could of bought any old rolling stock pre grouping so you could throw in all manner of kits- problem solved!

 

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Looking at the two Middleton Press books, which tend to be slightly better for older photos than others, I've found 3 useful pre-war shots - 

IWCR No 8 at Carisbrooke with what appears to be a timber-built stop on the siding there.

W3 at Bembridge (so before she was renumbered to W13) with another LSWR-type stop clearly in shot.

W20 at Brading dated 1937, with a spectacularly basic stop at the end of the siding in front of the 'box - hard to describe, but must be locally made in true Island fashion!

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12 hours ago, Nick C said:

Looking at the two Middleton Press books, which tend to be slightly better for older photos than others, I've found 3 useful pre-war shots - 

IWCR No 8 at Carisbrooke with what appears to be a timber-built stop on the siding there.

W3 at Bembridge (so before she was renumbered to W13) with another LSWR-type stop clearly in shot.

W20 at Brading dated 1937, with a spectacularly basic stop at the end of the siding in front of the 'box - hard to describe, but must be locally made in true Island fashion!

 

Glad to see we agree on all three of those counts and I can stop glancing back at those books to see if ive provided duff advice!

 

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