Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I always feel the Scots emphasise the second syllable so logically pol -Ma -Dee.   as in Glas -Gie but I've heard Mallaig called Mallig and Mull-Gai. Your all just rubbing salt in the wound of my not being able to go to Scotland this June after 33 years of summer solstice period holidays in the He - Lunds.

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, DavidCBroad said:

I always feel the Scots emphasise the second syllable so logically pol -Ma -Dee.   as in Glas -Gie but I've heard Mallaig called Mallig and Mull-Gai. Your all just rubbing salt in the wound of my not being able to go to Scotland this June after 33 years of summer solstice period holidays in the He - Lunds.

I thought Milngavie was Mull-Gai?:)

  • Like 1
  • Agree 13
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, DavidCBroad said:

I always feel the Scots emphasise the second syllable so logically pol -Ma -Dee.   as in Glas -Gie but I've heard Mallaig called Mallig and Mull-Gai. Your all just rubbing salt in the wound of my not being able to go to Scotland this June after 33 years of summer solstice period holidays in the He - Lunds.

 

Mal-lig is the correct pronunciation, Mal-laig is generally only used by those from points south.

  • Agree 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another one that rips my knitting is Tyndrum. It’s meant to be pronounced Tyne-drum rather than Tin-drum as those not local to Argyll tend to use. 
 

As for Polmadie, I’ve always used pol-mah-dee-was told that was correct to one of our retired drivers who used to be based there! 

  • Agree 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Poll Mac Dè was always pronounced Pol-ma-de at the SRPS Bo'ness.

2 hours ago, Bon Accord said:

 

Mal-lig is the correct pronunciation, Mal-laig is generally only used by those from points south.

Actually  sandy Bay, or Mel Vik in Old Norse, in Gaidhlig is pronounced more like Mal lik as ending "G"s often are in Gaidhlig

 However AI is much more random and seems to change from word to word, I can't get my brain around whether it's An A, Ai , or  I in the Gaelic. 

Edited by TheQ
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ga lik is the closest I can type, as the Gaels would say it.    that's ga not garh .

 

Of course the Gaels are not Scots...

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheQ said:

Actually  sandy Bay, or Mel Vik in Old Norse

 

As also in Melvich in Sutherland (it's on the NC500 if you're in to that sort of thing).

 

I would tentatively suggest that Melvich has rather more of a sandy bay then Mallaig does (these days - maybe it was more attractive before the railway turned it in to a commercial harbour).

 

Actually, the Wiki article for both places has "mel vik" as "sand dune bay".  There are certainly dunes at Melvich - I've walked through them!

 

Melvich_Bay.jpg

Edited by ejstubbs
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, ejstubbs said:

 

As also in Melvich in Sutherland (it's on the NC500 if you're in to that sort of thing).

 

I would tentatively suggest that Melvich has rather more of a sandy bay then Mallaig does (these days - maybe it was more attractive before the railway turned it in to a commercial harbour).

Sailed past it, didn't stop, it was a bit windy, we put into Scrabster for sail repairs...

Edited by TheQ
Link to post
Share on other sites

Polmadie - as Legend says is pronounced "Pol -Ma -Dee"  - as spoken by the locals.   But it needs to be said in the right rhythym - as in the rhythym "Dum dee Dum".     No emphasis on any syllable.  Just "Pol- Ma- Dee".                                                 

 

Another local pronunciation by the locals is the first station over the border going south on the West Coast Main Line.  It is pronounced "Kir - Lyle"  with the emphasis on the second syllable. (AM)

 

 

 

  • Agree 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

It's pronounced Sixty Six A....   :prankster:

 

 

I would just go with the way it's spelt and you would get away with it - Pol Mad E or Pol Ma Dee (saying them quick sounds similar). It seems some Scots agree. So that would be good enough for me. 

 

 

It can sometimes be a bit patronising to the locals when "foreigners" start using local pronunciations and accents though. You don't go to Newcastle and start saying "I'm gannin' doon t' Toon", do you? You say I'm going to town.

 

 

Or 27A if you have an LMS leaning. but that's more associated with Bank Hall now.

 

 

 

Jason

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, DavidCBroad said:

I always feel the Scots emphasise the second syllable so logically pol -Ma -Dee.   as in Glas -Gie but I've heard Mallaig called Mallig and Mull-Gai.

 

As someone born in Glasgow and brought up on Clydeside, my recollection is that the city was never called "Glas-Gie" in local dialect,  but "Glesga" with equal weight on both syllables.   Edinburgh was called "Embra". :-)

 

https://sco.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glesga

 

Jim

Edited by flubrush
  • Like 2
  • Agree 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, melmerby said:

I thought Milngavie was Mull-Gai?:)

 

Not unless you are one of those posh folk who pronounce it Mill-Guy and think sex is what you take the rubbish out to the midding.

 

You could always tell folk from the village that I used to stay in, they pronounced it Eagles-ham, the outsiders called it Eagle-sham.

 

Jim

  • Agree 2
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.