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I first, knowingly, came across the wonders of English ( etc.) place names when on a family holiday in north Devon when we passed a turning signposted to Woolfardsiworthy - but the next turning was for Woolsery and the third for Woolfardsiworthy again.

 

In this neck of the woods, we have the delights of Meopham, Wrotham, Trottiscliffe - shame THAT never had a station - Wateringbury and Teston ( Crossing ) to catch out the unwary ....... I once heard an announcement at Waterloo East for a train calling at Higgam ( between Gravesend and Strood ) !

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Loychars seemed to be a common mispronunciation for a certain station near St Andrews in Fife, normally accompanied by Queue-pah just beforehand...

 

Just as well Kilconquhar didn't have a railway station - The common murdering of that is Killyconker...

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8 hours ago, caradoc said:

Regarding pronunciation of place names, if you don't live near somewhere and have never heard its name spoken, can you not be forgiven for getting it wrong ? My colleagues at work occasionally took the mickey out of people mis-saying some of those mentioned above, eg Milngavie and Wemyss Bay, so I tested them with a couple from my neck of the woods, such as Cherwell and Thame. And guess what ? They got them wrong !

 

It  is bad enough when you live in a village, and some people reckon that you can't pronounce it.

 

The village of Greetham in Rutland was my home for nearly 15 years.

 

According to those in the western half of the village, the pronunciation was Greeth-em.

 

If you were from the Eastern half, it was Greet - em

 

According to legend, they 'ang 'em in Langham, poke 'em in Oakham, but eat 'em in Greetham.

 

I'll leve it to my lerned friends to discuss.

 

PS, it was always Pol-m'die to me.

 

Regards

 

Ian

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55 minutes ago, frobisher said:

Just as well Kilconquhar didn't have a railway station - The common murdering of that is Killyconker...


It did - https://www.railscot.co.uk/locations/K/Kilconquhar/

 

8 hours ago, caradoc said:

Regarding pronunciation of place names, if you don't live near somewhere and have never heard its name spoken, can you not be forgiven for getting it wrong ?


But you should pronounce it properly once it’s been explained to you. A common mis-pronunciation of ‘Greenock’ by people from the southeast of England is ‘Grennock’, presumably by analogy with Greenwich. Growing up in the next town to Greenock in the 1950s, we had a retired couple next door. The husband had transferred to Greenock from Woolwich when the Torpedo Factory moved in 1910. They both still called the town ‘Grennock’. (Apart from that, they were lovely people!:jester:)

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On 19/07/2020 at 11:54, EddieK said:

Some years ago, we almost considered purchasing the station house at Pont Y Pant. Would have had to have learned how to pronounce it properly, had that happened. 

Also, until we were gazumped, we had an offer in on the station house at Penrhyndeudraeth. Even though I still have no idea how to pronounce the name of the village. Perhaps not living there was for the best, as a few years afterwards the extreme weather saw the station platform and house surrounded by the sea....

Small world. I considered buying the station building at Penrhydeudraerh too. 20 years ago. I was told that the foundations weren't deep enough. Apparently it still needs a lot of work. I think it's rented out. 

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Seeing this picture reminded me of another place that once caught me out - Corstophine.

100_Corstorphine_30-12-67

 

I was once mocked for calling it COR-stuh-feen, whereas the correct pronunciation is Cuh-STOR-fin.

 

And by the way, how common were those wrap-around yellow ends in 1967?

 

Edited by Andy Kirkham
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22 hours ago, mallaig1983 said:

Small world. I considered buying the station building at Penrhydeudraerh too. 20 years ago. I was told that the foundations weren't deep enough. Apparently it still needs a lot of work. I think it's rented out. 

 

Our attempt was 15 years ago. Again, perhaps it was better not to move there.

 

When we did succeed in moving to Wales, we had an offer in on a house in Froncysyllte, but the Surveyor's report was not too complimentary about it, so we walked away. Imagine the joy of trying to order goods and services by telephone, had we lived there. We ended up living in Ruabon, easier to spell and to pronounce.

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58 minutes ago, EddieK said:

When we did succeed in moving to Wales, we had an offer in on a house in Froncysyllte, but the Surveyor's report was not too complimentary about it, so we walked away. Imagine the joy of trying to order goods and services by telephone, had we lived there. We ended up living in Ruabon, easier to spell and to pronounce.

Good job you weren't after a house in a certain village in Anglesey, not far from Robert Stephenson's bridge!

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On 21/07/2020 at 15:43, EddieK said:

 

Our attempt was 15 years ago. Again, perhaps it was better not to move there.

 

When we did succeed in moving to Wales, we had an offer in on a house in Froncysyllte, but the Surveyor's report was not too complimentary about it, so we walked away. Imagine the joy of trying to order goods and services by telephone, had we lived there. We ended up living in Ruabon, easier to spell and to pronounce.

Haha good point. It certainly is a bit of. Tongue twister. I always have fun with Trawsfynydd lol

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On 21/07/2020 at 08:29, Andy Kirkham said:

Seeing this picture reminded me of another place that once caught me out - Corstophine.

100_Corstorphine_30-12-67

 

I was once mocked for calling it COR-stuh-feen, whereas the correct pronunciation is Cuh-STOR-fin.

 

And by the way, how common were those wrap-around yellow ends in 1967?

 

It's actually spelt Corstorphine. I was stopped by a tourist one day in Edinburgh and asked for directions to Costofin, took me a while to work out they meant Corstorphine. Your right though, many Edinburgh folk seem to miss the first R (my wife's from Corstorphine and pronounces it COR-STOR-FIN.

 

Slightly OT, one pronunciation none of us could understand at work was one of our ships names. To every one in the fleet it was Minna with a short i as in independent, but when we had shore technicians visiting from the south of England they always said Meena.

Edited by JeremyC
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