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TRA259 cover.jpg

 

TRACTION issue 259 is published on 24th July.

 

We start this issue of TRACTION with a detailed look
at Lincoln Central which, in the 1980s, possessed
a marvellous selection of semaphore signals and
signal boxes. Michael Vanns used the signals as an integral
part of the photographs he took there.
Back in his younger days the editor was more than happy
to spend long periods of time overnight at major railway
stations observing operations. In July 1975 he travelled
to Stafford and spent fifteen hours watching an incredible
number and variety of trains during the late evening and night
hours.
In the first of a multi-part photo feature Gavin Morrison
looks at the Trans Pennine line between Manchester and the
western end of Standedge Tunnel at Diggle. It is a line that is
now seeing regular Class 68 hauled services, although their
introduction into service has been problematic.
Mick Humphrys concludes his article about driving
electric multiple units on the North London Lines. It’s good
to learn more about the less glamorous side of passenger
operations.
Until the decline of King Coal Milford Junction in Yorkshire
was something of a Mecca with the frequent freight services
attracting many enthusiasts. Chris Lenton recalls to visit he
made in the late 1990s.
We start a three part series of images taken on the Midland
Main Line by photographer Kevin Lane and backed up with
detailed captions by David Hayes. The first part covers the
line south from Kettering to just north of Luton.
In TRACTION MODELLING we feature a fascinating layout
Devonport Road which is based in Plymouth and features a
leisure centre, naval dockyard and parcels traffi c as well as
rolling stock maintenance and repair activities.

Edited by steverabone
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Pretty good edition I thought .

 

It had BR blue and a bit of EWS , so covers my chuffer interests !

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if you are a fan of all things blue on the WCML back in the mid 70s you will revel in the article on Stafford.  

 

Fascinating to relive what it was like back then with train after train rattling through.    I managed a 6/7 hour stint there myself a few years later in the early 80s but not overnight and regret not doing that to see the motorails the overnighters and the sleepers and mails and parcels.  AC paradise.......

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6 hours ago, ThaneofFife said:

if you are a fan of all things blue on the WCML back in the mid 70s you will revel in the article on Stafford.  

 

Fascinating to relive what it was like back then with train after train rattling through.    I managed a 6/7 hour stint there myself a few years later in the early 80s but not overnight and regret not doing that to see the motorails the overnighters and the sleepers and mails and parcels.  AC paradise.......

Strangely, for me, these are the features I enjoy the least. Somebody’s own list of passing trains just doesn’t really do anything for me .

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13 hours ago, ThaneofFife said:

if you are a fan of all things blue on the WCML back in the mid 70s you will revel in the article on Stafford.  

 

Fascinating to relive what it was like back then with train after train rattling through.    I managed a 6/7 hour stint there myself a few years later in the early 80s but not overnight and regret not doing that to see the motorails the overnighters and the sleepers and mails and parcels.  AC paradise.......

 

Thanks for these comments ThaneofFife.

 

7 hours ago, rob D2 said:

Strangely, for me, these are the features I enjoy the least. Somebody’s own list of passing trains just doesn’t really do anything for me .

 

My aim robD2 was not just to list what I saw but to explain the background to many of the workings that I saw during that evening and night. With the help of several enthusiasts we've been able to piece together much of the complexities of operation at the time. The 1975 WCML is almost as far away from todays operations as is the steam age. By presenting the article in both a tabular listing and an explanation of the nature of operations I'd hoped that I could satisfy at least two different audiences - the number crunchers and those with an interest in operation. Look again at the text and see what I mean!!

 

Stephen Rabone

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2 hours ago, steverabone said:

 

Thanks for these comments ThaneofFife.

 

 

My aim robD2 was not just to list what I saw but to explain the background to many of the workings that I saw during that evening and night. With the help of several enthusiasts we've been able to piece together much of the complexities of operation at the time. The 1975 WCML is almost as far away from todays operations as is the steam age. By presenting the article in both a tabular listing and an explanation of the nature of operations I'd hoped that I could satisfy at least two different audiences - the number crunchers and those with an interest in operation. Look again at the text and see what I mean!!

 

Stephen Rabone

Don’t take it badly, I’m sure a lot of the readership like that stuff, it just doesn’t do it for me. Even if it was platform 3, Reading station , 1982, all the stuff I saw, it wouldn’t ....

 

It’s like the model mags, always too many narrow gauge articles for me ...but it all weighs up in the end.

 

The stuff I did enjoy far out did that that I didn’t. Good choice of model as well - I’ve seen it in the flesh and the leisure centre ( of all things ) is a great bit of modelling !

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6 hours ago, steverabone said:

The 1975 WCML is almost as far away from todays operations as is the steam age. By presenting the article in both a tabular listing and an explanation of the nature of operations I'd hoped that I could satisfy at least two different audiences - the number crunchers and those with an interest in operation.

 

Absolutely; 1975 is only 7 years after the end of main line BR steam, yet an incredible 45 years from today ! I thoroughly enjoyed the article.

 

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some people probably prefer to just look at the pictures-LOL.......:wacko:

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2 hours ago, ThaneofFife said:

some people probably prefer to just look at the pictures-LOL.......:wacko:

 

I am sure this is true in many cases and of course that is a perfectly good reason to read a book or magazine.

 

I count myself very fortunate as I find almost any subject to do with railways or model railways of interest: steam, diesel, electric, multiple units, carriages, wagons, British, Irish, anything overseas, signalling, track, the commercial and operational side of railways, history, the future.

 

In terms of model making much the same applies as I find that almost any aspect of model making is relevant in some way to my own. 

 

On this basis I would always encourage others to broaden their interest and not be, as one reader once told me, "I'm only interested in what happened in the Preston area."

 

Stephen 

 

 

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