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Hi all 

           I have question I've recently purchased a Heljan Class 33 (33029) which comes as weathered Would it be possible to de-weather this as I believe it's somewhat over weathered being a charter loco and going on prototypical images on-line I'd like to remove/ reduce the body side grime effect and front end grime effects without affecting the maroon paintwork? 

 

Thanks in advance 

 

Kev Miller 

 

 

 

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I think that you have two options for removing what you don't want to be there. Both if them involve an element of risk, because you may take off too much and end up affecting the maroon paint. Much care needs to be exercised.

 

One option is to use isopropyl alcohol and the other is to use T-Cut, and both materials can be applied with soft cloth or cotton swabs/buds. Using very small amounts at a time, work in small areas so that you can better control your progress. Apply your chosen material using a small area of the applicator and work in small circular motions. Work slowly and carefully and you will see the unwanted colour coming away on the applicator. Both methods will result in a shiny surface, but that can be rectified using a matt varnish once you have finished.

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Heljan locos are particularly stubborn when it comes to removing the weathering. I have a feeling they spray over the weathering with varnish.

 

T-Cut has worked for me on my own models and clients. This was a client's Heljan Class 28 Co-Bo which had been factory weathered. T-Cut brought up a nice sheen on the body work, then I worked my own weathering on to the model.

 

 

 

 

DSC06283_(1).jpeg

Edited by Hawin Dooiey
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6 minutes ago, Hawin Dooiey said:

Heljan locos are particularly stubborn when it comes to removing the weathering. I have a feeling they spray over the weathering with varnish.

 

T-Cut has worked for me on my own models and clients. This was a client's Heljan Class 28 Co-Bo which had been factory weathered. T-Cut brought up a nice sheen on the body work, then I worked my own weathering on to the model.

 

 

 

 

DSC06283_(1).jpeg

Have to agree in that I’m sure they varnish over which is also one of the reasons they are a pain to renumber as you have to get through the varnish. Nice job on the CoBo!

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13 minutes ago, Squirrel Rail said:

Have to agree in that I’m sure they varnish over which is also one of the reasons they are a pain to renumber as you have to get through the varnish. Nice job on the CoBo!

 

Cheers!

 

Yes, sadly I think Bachmann have also followed suit. Previously Bachmann weathering came off easy with Microsol. I'm just working on a client's 4F and I have had to resort to T-Cut to get through the weathering, just to renumber. Even then the weathering was incredibly stubborn to remove!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Following through the thread and the use of enamel thinners or T-Cut  I used white spirit and cotton buds and a soft cloth on this 27 which had been, ahem "pro weathered". Couple of before and afters before a re-number and re-weather and back to it's owner.

IMG_3831.JPG.e20369eaf112199d8a5db070d8307643.JPGIMG_3827.JPG.780a4e9ab0ed3efa459ef5ab234ab450.JPG

IMG_3843.JPG.dd1224333676662d632500ad9d56a352.JPG

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On 05/09/2020 at 20:38, Squirrel Rail said:

Very nicely done- T Cut can be an absolute swine to get out of all the grills !

That 's why I found it easier to use blue T-cut, the first one I did I used white and as you say, what a pain to completely remove. The blue is almost the same as  BR blue.

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You can also use air duster that can blow it out the books and crannies. One of the bargain shops was doing it for a £1 a can.  Like with anything modelling there’s lots of ways to crack a problem but even better if you can avoid it in the 1st place!

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