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Amanda's 7mm Stuff - Baseboards Begin!


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42 minutes ago, Hal Nail said:

Aside from the satisfaction of building them, I think the Slaters one builds into a slightly better looking model personally, though not sure quite why: I think the roof is slightly finer which helps.

 

On the other hand those cast Dapol chassis do run very well and I suspect the new 10 foot GWR underframe on the conflat will lead to some further new releases which may well duplicate the Parkside range. I'm buying the kits I want while they are still around!

 

Parkside kits are sort of the cornerstone of 7mm modelling; everyone gets their start on them, everyone can afford one as a treat relatively often, and the build up into gorgeous wagons. I cannot imagine that they'd stop making a kit because an RTR one was around. There are loads of Dapol 16t minerals about, yet Parkside still makes the kits.

At least I sure hope so!

In other news, CME Buddha T. Cat has approved the acquisition of a second locomotive for the operation of the layout, sooo... more info soon!

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Dapol have been extremely slow to release new wagons.  I'm thinking of the PalVan and Vanwide that must have been gestating for 2 years or so.  These are on my list and I will probably build the Slater's kits.

 

I get the impression that modellers today, the youngish ones, haven't got the same desire to build kits as those of us who are somewhat older.  I also have the impression that many of those that do build kits are content to tip the box contents out and build the kit, instead of going for a model.

 

John

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5 hours ago, Hal Nail said:

Aside from the satisfaction of building them, I think the Slaters one builds into a slightly better looking model personally, though not sure quite why: I think the roof is slightly finer which helps.

 

On the other hand those cast Dapol chassis do run very well and I suspect the new 10 foot GWR underframe on the conflat will lead to some further new releases which may well duplicate the Parkside range. I'm buying the kits I want while they are still around!

 

Dapol/Lionheart wagons do run very nicely.  I am scarred by my first experience of a Dapol PO wagon which was pretty bad beneath the solebars (floppy wheelsets in brass tube brgs and excessive daylight at the brake shoes).  These were done before the merger with LH.  I rebuild the underframe using Bill Bedford W irons and brake gear.  Satisfying to bring the wagon up to spec, but a lot of extra cost and effort.

 

I am amazed at how many kits I have done over the last while.  Still, I have a lot of wagons left to do in the Parky range.

 

John

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Be careful on missing bearings for Dapol wagons. I've got a banana van and Dapol sent me a replacement but sellotaped it to a comp slip and it burst the envelope and it fell out in trasnit and now they claim they have no replacements in the UK. Now going to have to source another.

 

To be honest the quality control on the banana vans is pretty poor as 3 others needed work on them before I could use them

 

Paul R

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Kits offer a strong number of advantages over RTR / RTP in 7mm, not the least of which is price. Even built "out of the box" they tend to look better IMO, and if you wish to do a little bit extra, kits can be made into stunning models. I think 7mm will, for the foreseeable future, still be very much a "Kit and Scratch" scale, particularly for structures. 

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I agree about kits, wagons anyway.  RTR usually gives you about 80 - 90% of what you want but will always benefit from extra work.  Those rigid vacuum pipes spring to mind, I replace them with Slater's flexible pipes.  There still aren't that many different wagon types in RTR so we will need to mostly build kits.

 

As for buildings, there are very few RTP (Ready To Plonk) buildings - there a few Scenecraft on Tower Models site.  The buildings on my layout comprise of Scalescenes (scratchbuilding with the aid of excellent pre printed covers) and Lcut (laser cut parts that benefit from artful bodging).

 

I just spent a couple of days constructing doors and windows for my Scalescenes Corner Shop.

 

Here's a simple weigh bridge hut:

 

P1010122.JPG.474042644e97f1c005bbdb22c9175c03.JPG

 

Hut structure is Lcut but faced with Scalescenes brick.  Roof tiles are also Scalesenes.  Brass tube downspout with wire brackets in plastic.

 

The weighbridge itself is also a Scalescenes print.  I made the white guide from square section brass.

 

John

Edited by brossard
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Very good, you will not regret it.

 

The 74xx is in early BR guise as it carries a smokebox number plate and shed plate. I have found these can be removed with care if you wish to put it back to pure GWR livery. If you do, it will then need a number adding to the buffer beam.

 

Cheers, Ade.

Edited by Adrian Stevenson
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Very nice, too bad you have gone to the dark side.  :fie:

 

My friend bought a second hand Lionheart 74XX.  I left it in GWR livery but made it look like a BR loco with smokebox number plate and buffer beam numbers removed.  I also repositioned the cab route disc.

 

P1010139.JPG.7ce473382761d90cbda727aca4a78703.JPG

 

I gave it quite a heavy weather as you can see.  The model my friend bought did not have a top feed (these were added around 1942) so I made one.

 

P1010138.JPG.e7b010df6b0de663213e0005c5c8860b.JPG

 

Happy birthday BTW.

 

John

Edited by brossard
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HI guys, 

 

The 74xx is in precisely the livery I wanted. I'm modelling early BR, so the GWR paint with the smokebox number plate added is perfect. They run so amazingly well! I'll likely get another decoder identical to the one in 5717 as it has sound, inertia settings,  and seems to run a bit smoother at low speeds. 

 

Now I just need to build up the courage to weather them.  John's example is a bit grubbier than I really need, but God that looks great! 

 

Thank you for the birthday wishes! 

 

Amanda 

Edited by WM183
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Actually Amanda, my model could be grubbier.  I created a thread to get input on locos in GWR livery in the BR era:

 

I got some really good pictures so these may be of use to you.

 

John

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Wow... those 74s seemed to get unusually filthy, even by 60s BR(W) standards!

I want to weather my panniers, but am not yet sure how filthy I want them to be. Hmm.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi all!

Been a couple weeks, but we have not been idle. Construction has begun! The 1st baseboard has been built, 122x50 cm, and will be the first of 3 to this size, plus a corner section. It is made of very good quality 9mm Birch plywood and some 50x18 dimensional pine, being screwed and glued together. It's quite rigid and should work wonderfully! It will have a section of foam insulation board glued to the top for extra thickness and rigidity, and to allow me to sculpt ditches and a small, weedy stream bed. I put my mockup goods shed down to get an idea of scale, and I think this will work out!

 

lVMc5RH.jpg

 

ZRQqiJL.jpg

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  • WM183 changed the title to Amanda's 7mm Stuff - Baseboards Begin!

Nearly there then. :clapping: I glued 2" (50mm?) foam to my baseboards with the same idea in mind.

 

The foam does raise an issue with turnout motors (mine are Tortoise) under the board.  The actuating rod gets to be really long.

 

I excavated through the foam and board where necessary and inserted 1/4" ply as a motor mount.

 

P1010150.JPG.b9bbafc8d2ff5887cbf7a3520c7631d1.JPG

 

I borrowed my friends vibrating saw which did a great job:

 

P1010152.JPG.1e6e1e37eddfc27dc13834f7ec4df3ad.JPG

 

John

Edited by brossard
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Hi John,

I am uncertain how i will control turnouts; likely with Tortoise motors myself. I can likely get away with a slightly thinner foam board, but we shall see. Did you use plywood on top of the foam? Or am I just seeing this wrong?

Amanda

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The foam is orange.  I only used ply as an insert as shown in the first pic.  Adding the foam did create another job.  I'm still not sure whether it was worth it.

 

I only used Tortoise because I had them in stock recovered from an earlier layout.  From what I've seen, Cobalt from DCC concepts may be better.

 

My friend's layout uses mechanical switch machines:

 

https://www.micromark.com/Blue-Point-Switch-MachineTurnout-Controller

 

I have operated his layout at a show and I am quite impressed with these.

 

John

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I'd like to have an actual little lever frame to work turnouts, signals, and point locks as part of the control setup I think. Coupled with the locomotives' realdrive Dcc and 3 link couplings,  operations will be fun, I think.

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I used Wabbit stationary decoders (again left over from previous layout) and went down the simple route, wiring up momentary on push buttons in the fascia.  I put the buttons adjacent to the turnouts.  I also put the buttons on both sides of the layout so it can be operated from either/both sides.

 

P1010019.JPG.a8157dc7155aca9a2fa26409c73ff7af.JPG

 

John

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On 11/09/2020 at 15:35, brossard said:

I agree about kits, wagons anyway.  RTR usually gives you about 80 - 90% of what you want but will always benefit from extra work.  Those rigid vacuum pipes spring to mind, I replace them with Slater's flexible pipes.  There still aren't that many different wagon types in RTR so we will need to mostly build kits.

 

As for buildings, there are very few RTP (Ready To Plonk) buildings - there a few Scenecraft on Tower Models site.  The buildings on my layout comprise of Scalescenes (scratchbuilding with the aid of excellent pre printed covers) and Lcut (laser cut parts that benefit from artful bodging).

 

I just spent a couple of days constructing doors and windows for my Scalescenes Corner Shop.

 

Here's a simple weigh bridge hut:

 

P1010122.JPG.474042644e97f1c005bbdb22c9175c03.JPG

 

Hut structure is Lcut but faced with Scalescenes brick.  Roof tiles are also Scalesenes.  Brass tube downspout with wire brackets in plastic.

 

The weighbridge itself is also a Scalescenes print.  I made the white guide from square section brass.

 

John

Looks great, but the white guard rail hasn’t been bent by a careless trucky.......not authentic at all :lol:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all.

We built a second baseboard over the weekend, but much of my time the next week or two will be spent finishing, detailing, and lining a rake of LBSCR coaches for a friend. This bow pen lining business would give me grey hairs, if my hair wasn't already grey!

All the best!

Amanda

Edited by WM183
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