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Gill Head: Kirkby Luneside's neighbour


Physicsman
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Jam, of course it's ok to post stuff like that. The more, the merrier!

 

I like your idea of a spinning disc - it would work great if there was a central light source. Nowhere near as crazy as an idea discussed around the time of the original Kirkby Luneside thread....

 

....The idea was to rig up a rail arcing across the wall, starting low down, rising to its high position at the due South point, then descending. Onto this rail would be fitted light(s) - nowadays they'd be different coloured LED jobs. The lights would be motorised and move along the rail in real time, reaching due South at noon etc. In theory you'd get different angles of illumination, including rising and setting, and could create a whiter light at noon and a redder light at low altitudes, simulating atmospheric scattering.

 

All a bit bonkers, of course, though if I had a lot of space around the outside of a layout I'd be tempted to give it a go, even if it was a failure. I don't doubt that someone, somewhere, will have done this very thing.

 

Nice, moody, pic of Ribblehead btw!

 

Jeff

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On 29/11/2021 at 15:16, Physicsman said:

Lads, thanks for the feedback on my "article". I think Jonathan has it right - having taught Physics in research, and then for another 28 years, there's an immense satisfaction in being able to share the knowledge gained over a period of time.

 

I really CANNOT understand why anyone keeps advice to themselves - though, fortunately, we railway modellers tend to be a very generous bunch when it comes to helping others! I'll always be grateful for the input I've received over the last 10 years on RMweb.

 

As I said, above, what I've shown is what works for me. I would say, though, that having a really good static grass applicator is the key, and I couldn't recommend the Noch Grassmaster more highly.

 

Jeff

I guess that's why I enjoy doing the Tutorial Videos and with almost 1000 subscribers to my You Tube Channel now, its a far bigger audience than on here, but I still get good feed back on here, and so it makes it all worth while. 

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50 minutes ago, Andrew P said:

I guess that's why I enjoy doing the Tutorial Videos and with almost 1000 subscribers to my You Tube Channel now, its a far bigger audience than on here, but I still get good feed back on here, and so it makes it all worth while. 

 

If I could be bothered I'd have sorted out some videos to upload. But I find it hard enough to keep this thread going with updates, so I've never done more than that.

 

In a way, I'm quite happy doing my own thing and generally only respond if someone asks a specific question.

 

I guess everyone has things that give them a buzz, and I know you've always enjoyed the video side of things. You'll be taking over Sam's Trains next!

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10 hours ago, Andrew P said:

I guess that's why I enjoy doing the Tutorial Videos and with almost 1000 subscribers to my You Tube Channel now, its a far bigger audience than on here, but I still get good feed back on here, and so it makes it all worth while. 

I didn’t know you did that. I’m off to have a look. 

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More embankment "vegetating" today. I need to move on to the areas below the viaduct which, to date, have only received a grass covering. Not a lot needs doing there, but then there's the deep cutting by the door....

 

Enthusiasm surges at times, then - usually after a couple of weeks of a similar task - eases off. That's the case here.

 

Keep looking in. You never know what might happen next.

 

Jeff

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Sometimes you’ve just got to walk away and take break or do something different.

I speak from bitter experience. I kept working away on a building I knew was getting away from me. In the end I had to break it over my knee to make me stop and revisit square one.

 

D

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1 hour ago, lambiedg said:

Sometimes you’ve just got to walk away and take break or do something different.

I speak from bitter experience. I kept working away on a building I knew was getting away from me. In the end I had to break it over my knee to make me stop and revisit square one.

 

D

 

The issue of "mojo" or enthusiasm raises an interesting angle on the way some of us approach railway modelling.

 

When I was a kid I'd open my Triang Freightmaster box, get the track set up and the loco or train whizzing round as soon as possible. To a certain degree, when I re-discovered model railways in my late 30s I had the same attitude: buy a Hornby track plan book, go out and chuck money at locos, buildings etc, buy a piece of ply and get the "layout" (hahahaha) assembled on the board and running in a few days. At the same time I'd notice some of the layout plans, especially the "Railway of the Month" in Railway Modeller, and stand at the shelf in WHSmith shaking my head in disbelief that an 8' x 3' layout could have SO little track and tons of buildings/scenic context. 

 

I suppose there was a point when I "grew up" and learned that a proper LAYOUT did NOT appear at warp speed. It could be planned, prototypes consulted (especially with the advent of the internet) and the whole could include your own input: scratchbuilding. That point was probably about 12 years ago when a couple of people influenced me in a certain direction - to take my time, always try my best and to LEARN from some of the phenomenal work being displayed on RMweb. 

 

The relevance of these comments to mojo? Well, quality can take a lot of time. I mean quality in a relative sense. If you build something that's the best that YOU can do (and skills improve with time) then that is quality for you. It might be sh1t compared to a master, but so much better than buying everything in (though that, of course, is an individual choice). One of the consequences of working this way is that it CAN be bloody frustrating and time consuming (as in David's example, above). It can also be demotivating if the mojo dips when part way through, with a building half completed....

 

BUT the project doesn't have to be completed in a few days or weeks. As "Ramrig" has in his signature "a layout is for life, not just for Christmas". So.....enthusiasm/frustration etc cycles up and down, but at the end of the day - even if it takes YEARS - we edge forward....

 

I was getting pi55ed off with the viaduct at times, but the end result was a desired goal and it got done. I'm dreaming about static grass and DAS at the moment, but I'll give it a break and come back to it. And now it's the 80% built station building....I've done the hard work, so why do I keep putting off completing it? A break needed - then "on with the show".

 

The VERY BEST layouts on this Forum have taken years. It tells us something AND encourages us to keep going when going into the railway room may be the last thing we want to do.

 

Disclaimer: No Ready To Plant material was hurt in the making of this post. The view expressed relates to Jeff only. Other philosophies are available!

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A very heartfelt post there Jeff. Thanks for the mention. My signature came from people who use to say “how’s your train set” . Or “Still playing trains?”  Later when they see what you can produce there attitude changed completely. When a colleague and I produced the “Power for Life” model for our employer. It’s amazing how many people I had worked with for years came and said, “ I use to do a bit of modelling or I’ve got a set up at home. 
 

Keep up the great work Jeff. Many people on here have taken inspiration from what you have done, in saying that I don’t know anyone else who has taken on a viaduct like you did with individual stones. Well done sir. Your images showing progress are great to see and I for one always look forward to the next instalment, whether that be one day, one week or one month. At the end of the day it’s a hobby, not a paid job with deadlines. That ended when you retired. It’s a gentle stroll, with stops to enjoy the view. Not a sprint!

 

Enjoy the hobby!!!

 

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A proper layout doesn’t get built at warp speed - well unless your name is Andy Peters of course. Blink and your likely to miss one.

 

I think one of the benefits I find with being an N modeller is that I have a few different layouts on which I can operate different stock and time periods, and where I can flit between layouts as the fancy takes me. This invariably happens when I’m getting bored with a specific task.
 

Currently I’m doing a base ground layer for an inner city goods yard I started when I took early retirement 9 years ago and I am now trying chinchilla dust as everything  I’ve tried from the more usual sources are far too coarse for the delicate little feet of Modelu figures to traverse.

 

A little a day will get it done and if I don’t feel like doing any I don’t and move on an do something else, or slip through time back to the late 40’s to my GWR BLT branch line where I need to work out how to get a Dukedog into the station as it’s protruding connecting rods snag on the platform edging. Something to tax the little grey cells but as with everything there’s no rush as it’s all about the journey, and it’s not a race.

 

Railway modelling is our hobby, and as long as we are deriving pleasure from what we do that’s all that matters, not the rate of progress achieved or not.

 

Brian

Edited by Dragonboy
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To the person who sent me the PM about hyperspatial effects causing distortions in perception of modelling quality (things looking better than they really are), and causal translations resulting in layouts being completed before they've even started (warp speed - why so slow?)....

 

Thank you very much - greatly appreciated ... :angel::):good::angel:

 

I've gone online and taken out the relevant 20 year subscription for you. Follow the relevant guidance and you will no doubt benefit immensely. Just beware of transformations of the cat litter!! 

 

Jeff

 

 

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9 hours ago, Dragonboy said:

A proper layout doesn’t get built at warp speed - well unless your name is Andy Peters of course. Blink and your likely to miss one.

 

I think one of the benefits I find with being an N modeller is that I have a few different layouts on which I can operate different stock and time periods, and where I can flit between layouts as the fancy takes me. This invariably happens when I’m getting bored with a specific task.
 

Currently I’m doing a base ground layer for an inner city goods yard I started when I took early retirement 9 years ago and I am now trying chinchilla dust as everything  I’ve tried from the more usual sources are far too coarse for the delicate little feet of Modelu figures to traverse.

 

A little a day will get it done and if I don’t feel like doing any I don’t and move on an do something else, or slip through time back to the late 40’s to my GWR BLT branch line where I need to work out how to get a Dukedog into the station as it’s protruding connecting rods snag on the platform edging. Something to tax the little grey cells but as with everything there’s no rush as it’s all about the journey, and it’s not a race.

 

Railway modelling is our hobby, and as long as we are deriving pleasure from what we do that’s all that matters, not the rate of progress achieved or not.

 

Brian

Brian, You will be pleased to know that I haven't touched the Layout this week, apart from about an hours running for tomorrows 5 minute Video.

Anyone want to by a Train Set?:D

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7 minutes ago, Andrew P said:

Brian, You will be pleased to know that I haven't touched the Layout this week, apart from about an hours running for tomorrows 5 minute Video.

Anyone want to by a Train Set?:D

 

What's this, Andy? Are you playing Father Christmas 2021 with a layout to sell? :D

 

Just curious.

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A couple of panoramas. More vegetation is going onto the cutting that's in the foreground of the first picture. I'm going to need to make myself some spindly, wind-blown trees for the sides of that one. Another skill to look forward to!

 

20211205_155224_stitch.jpg.91645d09b4d582378563e8d35d6c1675.jpg

 

20211205_155519_stitch.jpg.f7969710fdb1fa920aea858ddcb80f65.jpg

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2 hours ago, John Besley said:

 

Give it a go, be interesting to see how it pulls it all together 

 

Nah, I was just being sarcastic - though photoshopping means I'd still get in the corners with "ease".

 

I'll be painting 2 corner boards in the coming week - IF I've got some ply!

 

J.

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12 minutes ago, Peter Kazmierczak said:

Just to prove I actually sometimes do a bit of modelling. To be honest, though, I think Woodhead Tunnel was still open when I did this...

P1260083 (2).JPG

Looking at that black and white image are we talking the first Woodhead Tunnel :jester:

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Ah, now I understand the historical context behind Peter's work.

 

Radiocarbon dating on that 'box confirms an 1888 (Eighteen) build, in line with that booklet, Steve.

 

If Peter cares to look at the pic on page 67 of KL2, he'll find his old "mate" who was also around at that time! :D

 

Seriously, Peter, thanks for your signal box pic.

 

Jeff

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