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If I'm feeling lazy I just heat the resin in the vat with a heat gun for 30 seconds before printing. The UV array should keep the resin warm once it starts printing. I wouldn't use it outside in sub-zero or wet conditions, and it's probably not ideal full stop, but ultimately many of them are probably in single skin brick garages, which aren't that much different atmospherically!

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Interesting discussion.

 

I'm very pleased with my Elegoo Mars and despite a steep learning curve, I am getting some great prints. 

 

I have certainly noticed that ambient temperature does effect the resin performance and at the other extreme on a bright and sunny day, the resin in the vat develops a film very quickly! One to be avoided.

 

I would recommend the Mars.

 

 

 

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The Mars 2 Pro is back in stock on Amazon again. I had a £42 voucher for the delays to the Saturn. Got plenty of resin (4 litres of Anycubic for £82 on AliExpress currently), so I’ve gone for the 2 Pro. Should be interesting. That’s 4 printers now; with the Photon, original Mars and the Saturn. Should stop...

 

I also notice Amazon are carrying the range of Siraya Tech resins at sensible prices, which is great news. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Have just managed to grab a bargain on Amazon, Black Friday deal on a Mars, £148 down from £184, didn't think that was a bad price! Now to find some resin at a good price...any suggestions folks?

 

That is very neat mudmagnet! Love the detail!

 

Tom

Edited by tstageman92
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Elegoo resin is only £25 on Amazon at the moment, so get a litre of that to get you going (grey is probably the default choice for most).

 

I use Anycubic resin normally, bought from AliExpress; the prices are quite volatile and there are always different deals and coupons; usually you can get 5 litres for about £85.

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I have been busy with various 3D CAD drawings and printing several parts.

 

I printed some 7mm rail chairs several months agon on my filament printer and although acceptable, not quite there with the detail I wanted. Finally got round to re-drawing and printing in resin. I've also made a stack of these and painted up. Also a couple of 4mm stacks to fit inside Scale Model Scenery depot basket.

 

I've printed some anchors for a future project.

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, Furness Wagon said:

Has anyone else had problems cleaning up Water soluble resin? It comes off the prints ok but it then sticks to the kitchen sink which is not going down well with the SWIBO. Any tips before I'm forced to sell my new toy?

 

I believe it is water washable, not water soluble, although I'm not certain that makes sense.

 

You certainly should not be washing in the sink and then letting the water go down the plughole. It is still , environmentally, nasty stuff.

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I have obtained some Elegoo resin from Amazon, which should hopefully be here in the next couple of days, and can have a go at a few prints. I think I'm going to find resin printing is a tad more involved than printing with an FDM printer...

 

Those printed parts are very very neat Mudmagnet, if I can produce anything half that good from mine Mars I'll be over the moon!

 

Tom

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5 hours ago, tstageman92 said:

I have obtained some Elegoo resin from Amazon, which should hopefully be here in the next couple of days, and can have a go at a few prints. I think I'm going to find resin printing is a tad more involved than printing with an FDM printer...

 

Those printed parts are very very neat Mudmagnet, if I can produce anything half that good from mine Mars I'll be over the moon!

 

Tom

 

Thanks Tom, I'm still long way from perfecting the prints. One of the main issues has been working out the best way to orientate and support the parts, but think that I am getting the hang of that now. Still having a few concerns and issues with cleaning etc, but working through that now as well. Been quite a learning curve, especially compared to filament printing, but enjoyable nonetheless.

 

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On 26/11/2020 at 23:11, mudmagnet said:

 

Thanks Tom, I'm still long way from perfecting the prints. One of the main issues has been working out the best way to orientate and support the parts, but think that I am getting the hang of that now. Still having a few concerns and issues with cleaning etc, but working through that now as well. Been quite a learning curve, especially compared to filament printing, but enjoyable nonetheless.

 

Yes, I think thats what I'm going to find the most challenging being so used to filament printing! I am just waiting for some IPA to turn up and then I'll be giving mine a go for the first time. 

 

So with what you have learnt regarding orientating and supporting, what would you suggest for this? Its a sprue of 24 N gauge coach buffers, what do you think would be the best way to print these? I have just installed Chitubox for the first time and having a bit of a play around with it prior to being able to print. I'm hoping it'll produce some nice prints of this as I use a lot of these for 3D printed EMUs but wouldn't have a hope in hells chance of getting my FDM printed to print these! 

 

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Break that sprue up - you’re asking for trouble trying to get a good result like that. 
 

I’ve printed buffers face down before, which works ok but does give a totally flat face, which you may not want. Otherwise I’d probably try printing them individually, heavily inclined with a couple of very small supports on the head and a couple on the stocks. Leaving the ‘extended’ stock is probably a good idea for easier handling. 

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Currently too cold in the garage - i.e. ambient temperature too low - for successful printing. The resin does not like the cold! Even when it has been warmed a little in the vat, still having more failures than happy to accept. So, with permission from the 'boss', I've temporarily moved the printers in to the house. Much improved! Only drawback is that noise of the fans is noticeable and added a faint obvious odour from the resin, can only use during the day when I have the house to myself (work from home most days).

 

I've printed up a few 7mm oil drums with hand pumps.

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I had a similar problem with temperature. If you don't mind drilling two or three holes in the cover (which actually drills very nicely), you can make yourself a temperature controlled little heater. I got all the bits cheaply from Amazon - it seems to be very effective; I've not had any prints fail due to temperature (I think!), just dodgy supports. I printed a few parts this weekend when it was only 4 degrees in the garage. I can provide a list of Amazon links if you are interested.

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19 minutes ago, Fen End Pit said:

Those barrels look very nice, love the pumps. I've had to move my photon inside too, it's brass monkey weather out in the garage!

David

 

Its not the issue here, hopefully this summer will be cooler than last year when there were a couple  days that my steel walled and roofed printing shed hit 54 degrees C inside.  The heat  killed the LCD screen  on my multimeter that I left on my workbench in the sun, it just went black...

Edited by monkeysarefun
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18 minutes ago, jdb82 said:

I had a similar problem with temperature. If you don't mind drilling two or three holes in the cover (which actually drills very nicely), you can make yourself a temperature controlled little heater. I got all the bits cheaply from Amazon - it seems to be very effective; I've not had any prints fail due to temperature (I think!), just dodgy supports. I printed a few parts this weekend when it was only 4 degrees in the garage. I can provide a list of Amazon links if you are interested.

 

 

 

 

 

That does sound interesting, more information would be appreciated

David

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7 hours ago, jdb82 said:

 I'll send you a message so as not to hijack Mudmagnet's thread :-)

I have no problem if you want to add details here.

This thread has developed into quite interesting discussions and happy that this had happened. Started out as a few things i am doing, but other people's views and experiences are very welcome. 

 

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Here's my solution to the British garage in winter to go with the photos above.....

The heater is simple to put together using the following components, and seems to work quite reliably. I might add that I am not printing all day everyday - I might use it a couple of times a weekend. I was worried that it might burn out as the parts are not exactly the finest money can buy, but I've had no problems with it so far. The longest it's been run for is about 6 hours. Even this isn't continuous through as I have it set to click on at 24 degrees, and off again at 26.

You'll need:

Temperature control unit (24V): https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07RJFC89N/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

24V PTC electric fan heater: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07BK1VQTP/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

24V power supply (I had one from a previous project, but this one will be fine): https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B071W121H7/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I made a bracket to fix the fan to the printer cover with, and some M4 bolts hold it all together. I made mine out of some spare aluminium sheet I had, but this could always be 3D printed on an FDM machine if you have one. The metal bracket gets quite warm, so I added rubber washers between the bracket and the printer cover - they also stop the plastic cracking if I over-tightened the bolts.

 

I chose 24V components for two reasons: first, I had a spare 24V power supply knocking around already, and second, because they give a bit more heat, a bit more quickly, but there are 12V options  available for all 3 of the components. You could use an old computer power supply for the 12V versions, as long as it's beefy enough to handle the current drawn. 

 

You can just about see from the photo that I've mounted the temperature controller on top of the cover, which get hung on the hook above to keep it out of the way when I need access inside.

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John

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