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2"x1" batten timber - interpreting lengths available on trade web-sites.


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Sorry to ask what is probably a daft question, but I am trying to find some ten foot (3.2M) lengths of 2"x1" for the underframe of a 2'6"x9'6" baseboard.  I have asked a few baseboard manufacturers and they say the longest they can do is six feet.  This (two boards) might be my only option, but if I can find a builders' merchant who sells 3.2M/10' lengths of timber, I am happy to have a go at making a frame myself.

 

I saw these on Travis Perkins' web-page:

 

https://www.travisperkins.co.uk/planed-softwood-timber/redwood-planed-timber-standard-25mm-x-50mm-finished-size-20-5mm-x-44mm-minimum-order-qty-of-12/p/180032

 

https://www.travisperkins.co.uk/planed-softwood-timber/redwood-planed-timber-best-25mm-x-50mm-finished-size-20-5mm-x-44mm-minimum-order-qty-of-12/p/141034

 

but it only gives a price per metre.  Does anyone know if I may ask them to supply a pack of ten at 3.2M length?  If anyone has dealt with timber merchants knows how they work, I would be grateful for any background knowledge.  I do not wish to appear a total D.I.Y.-er when enquiring.  :fool:  All advice gratefully received...

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I suggest that you call Totton Timber who convert, regularly, my request in imperial into their stock in Napolean.  Timber at 2.4M and 3.2M lengths have been delivered here.

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If you wander in to a Travis Perkins or better still a specialist timber supplier you can pick the lengths you want. Not knowing your location I've no idea what is around you.

 

Timber is a mix of measurements,  2"x1" is a nominal dimension as it is machined to 44mmx19mm, but it comes off the ships in what were imperial measurements 10', 11', 12' 16' etc these give 3M, 3.6m 3.6m etc, you can cut a shorter length from a 5M + length but depending on the length you leave you may be charged for it. 

 

Avoid anything with large knots and check for straightness (no twists) be prepared to convert the timber very quickly and assemble into boards.

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I noticed that when ordering timber recently - Travis Perkins didn't specify lengths. I went elsewhere (Mid Sussex Timber, not far from me here) where I was able to specify lengths on the website when ordering.

 

So you could just try another merchant.

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Yes, priced by the metre, but sold in fixed lengths. 3.2m isn't a standard length, but 3.3m is and most/all self respecting timber yards should have that standard length in stock. Avoid DIY sheds for this, you would be buying rubbish. 

Ian

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Yes, as Ikcdab said, DIY sheds or normal builders merchants are probably best avoided if you want quality timber.

 

I would always suggest going to a proper timber merchant who has a good reputation for supplying quality timber, and who also imports their own wood directly from abroad. If you are in the Kent/Sussex, London area, I would recommend looking at Alsford Timber (https://www.alsfordtimber.com/branch-locator/), who also have a website from which you can place your order, but a personal visit is much better and should result in you viewing the timber and selecting which pieces you wish to purchase before they are cut to size.

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Many thanks to you all for your kind advice, and replying so promptly.  I will get on the 'phone and see what is around.  I did not want to sound like a total numpty to them: 3.3M is a useful length to me, and I am glad to hear it is a 'standard'.  With best wishes and thanks for giving this your time.

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9ft 6" is quite a span for 2 X1.    I think I would use something deeper and use less legs.   Then again my well seasoned materials usually come from a skip and not from DIY stores to avoid the dogs hind leg distortion I used to get when using "New" timber, Mind you if you buy without checking the product the knot hoes are useful for poking wires through. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 18/09/2020 at 06:09, DavidCBroad said:

9ft 6" is quite a span for 2 X1.    I think I would use something deeper and use less legs.   Then again my well seasoned materials usually come from a skip and not from DIY stores to avoid the dogs hind leg distortion I used to get when using "New" timber, Mind you if you buy without checking the product the knot hoes are useful for poking wires through. 

 

The biggest issue with a 3200mm length of 44mm x 18mm wood is that it's not going to be straight, not by a long shot. Sure you can go through every piece of wood in the rack at the timber merchant's, but it's still going to be a bit off, in any of upto 6 axis. If you're wanting to brace something that long, I'd consider if you're not better off using ply wood on it's edge. Ply can be bought in 4880mm lengths, but if it was me in this particular case, I'd get a sheet of 9mm ply, have it cut into 50mm strips, then laminate those 9mm strips to make a 3200mm x 50mm x 18mm, if you do the over laps right, you'll get a much stronger, and not much heavier alternative to a nominal 2" x 1" PAR softwood. Just make sure you use a reasonable quality PVA glue, and lots of clamping/weight to make the bond as good as you can. 

 

J

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5 hours ago, Julia said:

 

The biggest issue with a 3200mm length of 44mm x 18mm wood is that it's not going to be straight, not by a long shot. Sure you can go through every piece of wood in the rack at the timber merchant's, but it's still going to be a bit off, in any of upto 6 axis. If you're wanting to brace something that long, I'd consider if you're not better off using ply wood on it's edge. Ply can be bought in 4880mm lengths, but if it was me in this particular case, I'd get a sheet of 9mm ply, have it cut into 50mm strips, then laminate those 9mm strips to make a 3200mm x 50mm x 18mm, if you do the over laps right, you'll get a much stronger, and not much heavier alternative to a nominal 2" x 1" PAR softwood. Just make sure you use a reasonable quality PVA glue, and lots of clamping/weight to make the bond as good as you can. 

 

J


Good point about the PVA glue - it’s not just the wood that matters if you want to produce a straight and square board without having to redo things (as we usually say: don’t ask me how I know!)

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10 hours ago, Julia said:

 

The biggest issue with a 3200mm length of 44mm x 18mm wood is that it's not going to be straight, not by a long shot. Sure you can go through every piece of wood in the rack at the timber merchant's, but it's still going to be a bit off, in any of upto 6 axis. If you're wanting to brace something that long, I'd consider if you're not better off using ply wood on it's edge. Ply can be bought in 4880mm lengths, but if it was me in this particular case, I'd get a sheet of 9mm ply, have it cut into 50mm strips, then laminate those 9mm strips to make a 3200mm x 50mm x 18mm, if you do the over laps right, you'll get a much stronger, and not much heavier alternative to a nominal 2" x 1" PAR softwood. Just make sure you use a reasonable quality PVA glue, and lots of clamping/weight to make the bond as good as you can. 

I was going to ask if the layout was portable!  Yeah well.  10ft.   

I think I would go for 100 mm depth on the ply.   50 mm over a 3200 mm span doesn't sound right to me.   100 X 9 sounds a better bet for not sagging than 50 X 18

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1 minute ago, DavidCBroad said:

I was going to ask if the layout was portable!  Yeah well.  10ft.   

I think I would go for 100 mm depth on the ply.   50 mm over a 3200 mm span doesn't sound right to me.   100 X 9 sounds a better bet for not sagging than 50 X 18

 

Well yes, there is that. Personally I'd do it as 2x 1600mm boards at a minimum, or ideally 4 x 800mm. My 50mm x 18mm was trying to keep within the constraints of the OP, and their 2" x 1" requirement. I try to avoid too much of the "I'm trying to get to x" "Well I wouldn't start from here" type answers... 

 

J

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On 30/09/2020 at 02:10, Julia said:

 

The biggest issue with a 3200mm length of 44mm x 18mm wood is that it's not going to be straight, not by a long shot. Sure you can go through every piece of wood in the rack at the timber merchant's, but it's still going to be a bit off, in any of upto 6 axis. If you're wanting to brace something that long, I'd consider if you're not better off using ply wood on it's edge. Ply can be bought in 4880mm lengths, but if it was me in this particular case, I'd get a sheet of 9mm ply, have it cut into 50mm strips, then laminate those 9mm strips to make a 3200mm x 50mm x 18mm, if you do the over laps right, you'll get a much stronger, and not much heavier alternative to a nominal 2" x 1" PAR softwood. Just make sure you use a reasonable quality PVA glue, and lots of clamping/weight to make the bond as good as you can. 

 

J

A known straight value is Unitrack, as used in the electrical trades.  Glueing & clamping wonky plywood to the steel section normally assists in creating a fairly good edge & finish.  Also, you can make your parts slightly oversize. Once glued & set (and straight) you can run the saw down to your intended size.  

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