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Models which have stood the test of time


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First a potential apology...I have no idea if this has been done before, or indeed done to death. If so, as I say many apologies. 
 

It came about as I took some photos on my train set. One in particular stood out as, although an old model now, to me at least it absolutely portrays what it is supposed to be. No doubt purists and cognoscenti could rip it to pieces, but for me, it looks the part.

 

Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Bachmann Standard 5.

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Edited by PhilH
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You'd have to include the Hornby Dean Single and 'shorty' clerestories, in production on and off since Triang introduced them in 1962, and not retooled AFAIK apart from bogie mounts.  The coaches still have the 1962 'clip on the bottom of the body' underframes!  

 

I suggest imposing a rule that retooled models don't count.  The newly introduced Hornby large prairie for instance owes it's heritage to the ancient Airfix 61xx, which the previous incarnation of the Hornby had a direct lineage from.  The body had been retooled to incorporate separate handrails and a better smokebox door, and the chassis retained the heavy cast mazak Airfix outline and plastic-backed pickups, but had a new motor and drive moved to the centre axle; pony and radial trucks became open backed at some point.  Not sure if you can regard that as standing the test of time.

 

If you want protoytypes that have stood the test of time, in 4mm you have to mention Hornby Dublo's A4, still in production by Hornby though much retooled, dating from 1938.  But this is a bit of a tenuous link as the current Hornby is genetically Triang, who bought out the rights to the Hornby name when Meccano went under in the mid 60s and HD production was taken on by Wrenn.  Hornby's current Princess has it's roots in the 1949 Rovex Black Princess, and there has been a Princess in the range continually throughout Rovex, Triang, Triang Hornby, and Hornby's existence.  

 

If you mean longevity of types as standing the test of time, plenty of those old Hornby Dublo and Triang locos are still running; if you keep them clean, properly lubricated, and replace the carbon brushes when they wear out they are pretty bombproof. 

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I should like to add Airfix Mk2d coaches to the list please.  I purchased mine around 1977 and remember thinking wow!

 

I'm still running them on my layout some 43 years later hauled by wonderful modern Hornby and Bachmann locos - and to my eye these coaches still look good.  All I ever did was replace the wheels with metal ones, and applied FMR (now Fox?) white lining transfers.

 

  No need to replace them with more modern versions IMO.

PICT0085 (4).JPG

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I'd say a good chunk of the Airfix and Mainline ranges have stood the test of time above the running plate / solebar, not so much the mechanisms.

Edited by spamcan61
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Pretty much all the locos made for Bassett Lowke by Bing, and all the rolling stock made for them by Carette, in both cases pre-WW1.

 

I can’t afford ‘em, but by golly are they good!

 

 

BC976E83-DF21-4C84-BFCE-1CDA43F1F34C.jpeg

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The mainline RB , stands up with modern mk1 models even though its 40 years old.

Was there plans to introduce other mk1s to this standard?  The other mainline mk1s didn't really look right to me 

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I've a few oldies on my layout.  Oldest are 3 Triang 'shorty' clerestories, the design of which as we stated earlier dates back to 1962, and mine, puchased 2h at shows or off the 'Bay could have been produced at any time since then.  They scrub up tidy, like as we say around here, I've modified the bogies into ersatz Deans by cutting out the tiebar and fitting footboards, fitted compartment dividers and seats, glazed the clerestories and fitted new brass turned Dean buffers.  A 'round tuit' project is cut and shutting them to produce scale length coaches.  There are also some old K's A31 auto trailers and a plastic E116 B set, but these are kits and don't count.  

 

I've a large prairie that started life as an Airfix, but has had 3 new chassis', and I have now ordered a Hornby body off 'Bay, improved tooling with better smokebox door and separate handrails, and when this arrives the loco will become known as 'Trigger's Broom'!  My Hornby 2721 must be getting on a bit, but it's not the original model as it had the sort of generic Jinty chassis with all wheels flanged and the drive to the front axle, as well as brakes and rodding with the keeper plate.  This has also been worked up a bit; new chimney, dome, and safety valve cover, buffers, crew, lamp irons, real coal, cab glazing and a proper wooden planked cab floor.  It is currently running on a Bachmann 57xx chassis which needs fluted coupling rods.  

 

I had a bit of an unsettled lifestyle following a divorce in the 80s and not much of my stuff I had then has survived it but there are a few items.  I concentrated on not losing the locos, which repaid the effort by all promptly failing (Mainlines) within a few months of my starting again 4 years ago.  I have a Mainline fruit van which I have replaced the chassis of with a Parkside kit one, and this model is still available in the Bachmann catalogue with the very good current chassis, and I have one of these as well, but I prefer the old Mainline which has various chalked instructions on the doors and sides, a rather nice touch.  The rest of the 80s survivors are all NPCCS; a Lima Siphon G with bogies from an Siphon H, which in turn has had new 'American Pattern' 3D print bogies from Stafford Road/Shapeways, an Airfix outside framed Siphon G, Mainline Stanier 50' BG and a Lima LMS GUV off the 'Bay which must be knocking on a bitl, all except the Limas are models still in production with the original plastic body and underframe toolings, though they have retooled bogies with NEM sockets and couplings, and the Stanier BG is completely retooled to modern standards.

 

You can be critical of the moulded handrails and similar details, or cut them off and replace them with separate items (the Lima Siphon was transformed by correct bogies and decent buffers), and if you do they will hold their own pretty well against current products, especially above the solebars.

 

Hornby have a few of these old stagers inherited from Lima or Airfix still in the catalogue; GWR A28 or 30 auto trailers and E129 B set from Airfix, GWR Railcars from Lima and probably some others as well.  Bachmann as we have seen have a few freight bodies that have 'deep history' from Mainline, and are still selling the Mainline non-gangwayed mk1s, as are Dapol incidentally but in separate peices!  The Hornby 14xx is the Airfix body tooling, but has a new chassis.

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I’d agree with what everyone else has said and lob another into the mix - the airfix (now Dapol) wagon kits (also the kitmaster loco kits, how many of those are still about?).  They’ve outlived the 12”-1’ prototypes in service by at least 35 years (when did the last 16 tonners  disappear?) and how many of us have them on our layouts?  Certainly there’s a presflo and a meat van (although the second is a miniature restoration project) on mine.  Also the JCB3c, it’s either one of them or an Oxford diecast effort I see.

 

I’d also agree with the mainline range, both their wagons and the RB.  Also don’t forget the airfix GMR range, the wagons and coaches are still in production pretty much unchanged.

 

More recent - the Bachmann standard 4MT tank for me.  Can’t find an exact initial release date, but I’m sure I bought mine late 90’s.

 

Owain

 

Edited by Firecracker
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I would`nt touch any RTR stuff until the 1990`s.

 

So, for me,  two Bachmann and two Hornby that were and still are acceptable for conversion to other gauges or just replacement wheels.

 

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I know  I know ...none of these ran up to Devil`s Dyke     Duh!!     :D

 

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2 hours ago, russ p said:

The mainline RB , stands up with modern mk1 models even though its 40 years old.

Was there plans to introduce other mk1s to this standard?  The other mainline mk1s didn't really look right to me 

The Replica FO and BCK look to to be from the same stable and they were sold alongside Replica's version of the Mainline RB. Were they originally developed by Mainline or did Replica design them to match?

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My quick list

 

Airfix 2Ds

Mainline RB (the Replica are Mainline designed)

Triang Mk 1s

Triang 31

Airfix 31

Triang Mark 2 when glazed

Mainline 03 & 56

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32 minutes ago, giz said:

The Replica FO and BCK look to to be from the same stable and they were sold alongside Replica's version of the Mainline RB. Were they originally developed by Mainline or did Replica design them to match?

 

The number of conversations I've had with Replica's Godfrey Hayes over the past two decades plus, I'm sure this must have come up and I can't remember (d'oh!) if Mainline created the tooling but never put the models on sale, or Replica did them from scratch. I seem to recall that he was keen to be able to put together the coach types used for the Inter City charter set, the one with white roofs. I know the 57' BG was Replica's and they also tooled a TSO which was never offered RTR but can be purchased in 'bits' from their website.

 

For longevity my own nominations would have to be:

Locomotive - for appearance anyway, the c1980 Mainline Warship, which captured the shape so well a new version (810 in weathered blue) was only canned by the new Class 43 in 2015

Rolling stock - having recently completed more work on my own example, the Tri-ang/Hornby 10-ton Cowans Sheldon crane. This was - and still is - a remarkably good model of these vehicles, managing to look the part while still retaining the 'play value' demanded by 1960s purchasers. I have a feeling it won't be long before it's back in the Hornby catalogue......

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Hornby Dublo plastic-bodied wagons and their final range of coaches with tin sides and plastic under-frames etc.

 

I am well aware that some of these are dimensionally compromised, but the plastic mould-making was absolutely stunning, and, IMO, the coaches convey reality far more effectively than any of the more accurate all-plastic models that have followed.

 

Put any of this lot on a layout, in a train, and it instantly conveys what it is without poking you in the eye - in fact the coaches especially are very eye-pleasing indeed.

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I would also say the Airfix Mark 2d coaches; What a revelation they were (and OTOH how annoying was it to have to wait so long for the TSO ?!)

 

I would put forward the Bachmann Blue Riband 16T mineral; An essential wagon for pretty much any UK based layout for a long, long timescale. I have rather a lot of them, I wonder how many thousands have been made over the years ? 

 

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The Poole era (i.e. before Bachmann) Graham Farish class 31 was very good and appart from lacking lighting and a DCC socket doesn't look out of place next to the 21st centuary version.

 

The chassis and livery application are poor by today's standards but the old Lima N Gauge GWR Siphon van can still scrub up well.

 

Steven B.

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Another vote for the triang mk 1s. I have a number in my collection, the oldest from around 1968 or so. They've been repainted and had new glazing and lettering and, to me, are as good now as ever. The last ones I picked up for £4 each at a swapmeet. The only issue was that the range of vehicles was so limited.

 

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Got to be the Airfix GMR toad brake van. Still being touted about at top dollar. Best respects to Hornby for releasing a far better model. 

 

I don't mind paying top dollar for top dollar models, but prehistoric models done up in fictitious colours & numbers is a bit off putting. 

 

Despite my short legs & my old car, I'm not Barney Rubble from the Flintstones....  

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The venerable 57XX from Bachmann. I know it's had a bit of work over the years but still holds it's own with the new models. A few others from that era are still good as well. But not many. Most now look extremely dated.

 

I would have included the J72 until I got the new one. Light years of difference.

 

 

I mean straight out of the box models, not things that have had work done to them. Many of the older models can be vastly improved with a little work.

 

 

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3 hours ago, ikcdab said:

Another vote for the triang mk 1s. I have a number in my collection, the oldest from around 1968 or so. They've been repainted and had new glazing and lettering and, to me, are as good now as ever. The last ones I picked up for £4 each at a swapmeet. The only issue was that the range of vehicles was so limited.

 

The vehicle Tri-ang should have made - the Mark 1 SK. Stick a different interior in it, Mark 1 SO. (I'm ignoring roofs here, just like Tri-ang used to!) As the raised window frames indicate, this model was created from an RMB with upper sections of another one inserted - would using two BSKs have been easier? Dunno, I used what I had to hand. SK interior salvaged from somewhere. The roof is one of a bunch of newly-tooled items I picked up for a pound each I think, to upgrade my other models.

I did this many years ago as part of a 5-coach set I was planning to sell on at a local show, hence the simplest livery I could think of. In the end the BSK, RMB and two CKs moved on but this SK stayed at home because I liked it and had other late 1960s WR Tri-ang Mark 1s it could run with. I considered respraying it maroon or blue/grey but the 'Uncorporate Image' supplement issued with Traction 90 mentions green SK 24303 moving from the SR to the WR, so the white W prefix is deliberate!

Oddly enough I only got around to fitting glazing and the corridor hand rails about two months ago!!

 

 

WP_20201001_16_14_03_Pro.jpg

Edited by Neil Phillips
Added comment re roof sourcing (clearly not RMB!)
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1 hour ago, Steamport Southport said:

The venerable 57XX from Bachmann. I know it's had a bit of work over the years but still holds it's own with the new models. A few others from that era are still good as well. But not many. Most now look extremely dated.

 

I would have included the J72 until I got the new one. Light years of difference.

 

 

I mean straight out of the box models, not things that have had work done to them. Many of the older models can be vastly improved with a little work.

 

 

 

1 hour ago, Steamport Southport said:

The venerable 57XX from Bachmann. I know it's had a bit of work over the years but still holds it's own with the new models. A few others from that era are still good as well. But not many. Most now look extremely dated.

 

I would have included the J72 until I got the new one. Light years of difference.

 

 

I mean straight out of the box models, not things that have had work done to them. Many of the older models can be vastly improved with a little work.

 

 

The Baccy 57xx and the 8750 derived from it are cracking little models.  The 57xx is based on the Mainline body tooling and that holds up well enough to modern standards.  If only they'd release a version without the top feed and associated plumbing, or at least make these separate parts so we could remove them...  But I don't think you can bring up the 57xx without mentioning the 56xx, another 'improved Mainline' loco.  The 2 types between them are the core of my fleet, as they should be on a South Wales Valleys layout!

 

What about the Hornby BR Standard 4MT 4-6-0?

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From Italy, with the exception of bogies, the LMS 'short' 42-ft CCT (presently half a dozen on allocation, Bachmann Stanier bogies and replacement buffers work wonders).  The body of the Lima Siphon G is a decent starting point but replacing its bogies is a problem (4 examples).  Also the upcycled Hornby ex-Lima Class 101, only really let down by the clunky power car undergubbins (4 x 3-car units on allocation), the recent issues have transition liveries nicely rendered, as a basis for finessing.

 

Dapol, ex-Wrenn Fruit D isn't so glaringly bad, and scrubs up reasonably on the more acceptable current underframes, to my untutored eye at normal viewing distance (4 in general parcels use).  And while we're in Dapol/ Wrenn territory I've got a Prestwin project underway with four examples from each manufacturer (representing both prototypes)  - but all going on the kit underframe.  Again these scrub up okay, adequate for me in the absence of a new model to modern standards (and RRP). 

 

Of course going the other way, there are a good many howlers from last century shamelessly hanging on in 2020 ranges, but that's already a separate topic.

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1 hour ago, Neil Phillips said:

The vehicle Tri-ang should have made - the Mark 1 SK. Stick a different interior in it, Mark 1 SO. (I'm ignoring roofs here, just like Tri-ang used to!) As the raised window frames indicate, this model was created from an RMB with upper sections of another one inserted - would using two BSKs have been easier? Dunno, I used what I had to hand.

Maybe not easier, but cheaper and 2x BSK leaves enough parts for a scale length BG.

While not brilliant, the Lima Mk.1 range ended up quite reasonable once they'd added the RB and SK/TSO (they did both interiors) and their later liveries were quite good too (some of the early ones though were horrible!)

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Hi all,

For me it is the H/D or Wrenn 2-6-4 tank. To me it exudes power, purpose and class. And the H/D Duchess of Atholl. Then again the H/D A4 as well. You think you can see where this is going.......lol.

Stanier 2-6-4 2.jpg

stanier 2-6-4 4.jpg

stanier 2-6-4 3.jpg

Stanier 2-6-4.jpg

Duchess of Atholl 1.jpg

Duchess of Atholl 2.jpg

Duchess of Atholl 3.jpg

A4 Wild Swan 2.jpg

A4 Wild Swan 3.jpg

A4 Wild Swan 4.jpg

A4 Wild Swan and J72.jpg

A4 Wild Swan.jpg

Edited by cypherman
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