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KR Models announce the Consett Iron Ore Wagon


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Just now, johndon said:

 

Only when hauled by 9Fs, the 2 Class 24s managed with no bankers.

 

They still needed an 08 or similar to help them up the slope out of the yard at Tyne Dock but a Class 40 was rostered to bank the train from South Pelaw to Consett.  Plenty of photos of this exist.

 

The Class 40 was deemed to be "more easily spared" than a Class 37 for the job.....

Les

 

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Just now, Les1952 said:

 

They still needed an 08 or similar to help them up the slope out of the yard at Tyne Dock but a Class 40 was rostered to bank the train from South Pelaw to Consett.  Plenty of photos of this exist.

 

The Class 40 was deemed to be "more easily spared" than a Class 37 for the job.....

Les

 

 

The 40s were never used to bank the double headed 24s, they were perfectly capable of making it from South Pelaw to Consett without a banker.

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2 hours ago, Les1952 said:

When the Tyne Dock to Consett ore trains were dieselised they needed eleven diesels to replace ten steam.

 

Not sure what you mean, the 10 9Fs were replaced by 10 Type 2s (Class 24s)...

 

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  • 5 weeks later...

Very interesting film there -not only the brief mention of these wagons but also 

 

  • some excellent signalling views
  • goods views of conflats - including a fibreglass type that I've never seen before
  • views of the retarders in the process of installation, never seen that modelled.  Were any preserved?
  • the title "Age of the Train" long before it was being used by Jimmy Savile OBE
  • the sheer number of people working in control offices

And I loved the clip of the bloke blithely walking across the path of the coach on the traverser moving towards him, no health and safety, didn't even merit a mention in the commentary

 

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10 hours ago, Michael Hodgson said:

...I loved the clip of the bloke blithely walking across the path of the coach on the traverser moving towards him, no health and safety .....

 

Ah, but in those days we had that now supposedly extinct commodity, common sense; and an awareness of self-preservation.

 

Nowadays, the presumption is that everyone will do the stupidest thing possible in any circumstance, and that society has a duty to protect us from ourselves!!

 

Is it to be wondered that the 'stupid gene' is thriving, not having natural selection to keep it under control?

 

Puts on tin hat and hunkers down in slit trench!!

 

Incoming H&S profession artillery!!!

 

John Isherwood.

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14 minutes ago, cctransuk said:

 

Is it to be wondered that the 'stupid gene' is thriving, not having natural selection to keep it under control?

 

 
However it relies on the Swiss cheese and cherry tomato theory and it is only rarely that the predictable outcome happens!

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36 minutes ago, cctransuk said:

Nowadays, the presumption is that everyone will do the stupidest thing possible in any circumstance

 

But that's a valid presumption, because they do.

The problem is that they've got no-win no-fee lawyers whilst we have a judiciary with just as little common sense as the morons.

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2 hours ago, cctransuk said:

Ah, but in those days we had that now supposedly extinct commodity, common sense; and an awareness of self-preservation.

 

I mentioned common sense once on a Covid19 thread and got lambasted for doing so. ;)

 

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2 hours ago, cctransuk said:

Ah, but in those days we had that now supposedly extinct commodity, common sense; and an awareness of self-preservation.

 

There was also a much higher rate of industrial accidents and death. Around 4400 died at work in 1900, by 2000 that number was down to under 200 (figures from HSE). Clearly back in the good old days those without common sense didn't survive long enough to get a job...

 

Steven B.

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1 minute ago, Steven B said:

 

Clearly back in the good old days those without common sense didn't survive long enough ...

 

Steven B.

 

...... or to breed and perpetuate the 'stupid gene'!

 

John Isherwood.

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17 minutes ago, Steven B said:

 

There was also a much higher rate of industrial accidents and death. Around 4400 died at work in 1900, by 2000 that number was down to under 200 (figures from HSE). Clearly back in the good old days those without common sense didn't survive long enough to get a job...

 

Steven B.

They were actually the unlucky ones, I could have been one of those death statistics in my early railway career before HV vests were commonplace and there were robust rules around high voltage isolations of OLE in depots.

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20 minutes ago, 96701 said:

They were actually the unlucky ones, I could have been one of those death statistics in my early railway career before HV vests were commonplace and there were robust rules around high voltage isolations of OLE in depots.

It's a wonder you even passed your PTS wearing that red vest - it's not fully in compliance with current H&S rules !

Time was you'd have been told it was a Danger signal :lol:

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5 hours ago, cctransuk said:

 

Ah, but in those days we had that now supposedly extinct commodity, common sense; and an awareness of self-preservation.

 

 

So how is the chap in the video showing common sense? 

 

It would seem to me that it would be common sense not to be walking across the traverser pit, particularly when the thing is in motion, and as I suspect the traverser would have had an operating cabin, and since it doesn't seem to be visible in the clip, it suggests he is on the operators blind side. 

 

For all its many faults, H&S processes clearly have a measurable impact on reducing the number of workers who never came home, or did come home but with major bits missing. Unfortunately deaths at work do still happen (the best friend, of  the boyfriend, of one of the girls I work with, was killed at work earlier in the year) but thankfully it's rare.

 

Jon

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8 hours ago, Michael Hodgson said:

It's a wonder you even passed your PTS wearing that red vest - it's not fully in compliance with current H&S rules !

Time was you'd have been told it was a Danger signal :lol:

Oi! I resemble that remark!

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Having had a father who had large amounts of 'common sense' , but who was still injured in a workplace accident do to the accepted and  pretty awful safety standards of days gone by, I find some of the comments in this thread interesting. Safety in any setting is a two way street, you have an obligation to look to your own safety, but others have an obligation to ensure that where you are working is not unsafe, even if it is just a notice). 

I suggest anyone who thinks 'common sense' is the answer to everything from H&S, driving to Covid needs to spend a week in A&E or a major trauma centre. 

The problem with contingent fee work is that it it requires the client to take out an insurance policy to cover a potential case and firms will only look at the work if they have a very high chance (used to be about 90% plus) of winning. 

Everyone is an idiot or scrounger until you are one who suffers a life changing incident when the world looks a very different place. As someone who started out as a lawyer, but spent most of my working life as  a nurse and finished up teaching law to health professionals, this is an area I have given some thought to. 

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As a pretty vocal critic of the original engineering prototype, I'll say that these do look much better and the interior detail is nicely done.  There are a few things that niggle for me but I suspect that they would go unnoticed by most purchasers of these wagons...

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Aside from my niggles with the wagon, one thing I will comment on, before anyone else notices, that is definitely wrong on the EP is the manual release handles on the ends (or at least one end of the wagon).  In the annotated photo below, I've circled the handle in question.  On the model, as it stands, on both ends the handle angles down to the left so it ends up on opposite sides of the wagon at each end.  This is incorrect as the handles were on the same side of the real thing at both end so, at one end it should slope to the left and, on the other, it should slope to the right.

 

To give KR Models their due, when I pointed this out, they did say that it would be corrected on the production example.

 

82CEF11D-A9E9-4A23-9CDB-5DE4C952A18B.jpeg.3205e4559889e3ca175b3f58376ead67.jpeg.aafb09b9061ace368841566ac80550a2.jpeg

Edited by johndon
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Got a full rake on order and my twin air pump 9F will arrive shortly in readiness. Nice to see the interior detail has been included just trying to remember if I ordered these with a load or not !

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