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Proceedings of the Castle Aching Parish Council, 1905


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On 12/01/2021 at 17:27, drduncan said:

I’d consider it a blessing...

For whom exactly?! I'm currently stuck in Bognor Regis and unable to return to Wales. I'd much rather be there than here.

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13 hours ago, Caley Jim said:

Like Greenland, it's not for sale!!:nono:

 

Jim

 

It's surprising what one can buy in Scotland (as, no doubt, elsewhere) with the connivance of local politicians and a campaign of harassment and vilification against any who hold out. 

 

Promised jobs - albeit - riles henchmen in orange boiler suits - would no doubt make the project seem very attractive to the Scottish government. 

 

After all, golf course to full-blown lair is a traditional step for Bond Villains.

 

trump-and-pence-look-like-bond-villians-01.jpg.9847b485e99cb6b546bea3bb44a10e62.jpg

 

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26 minutes ago, ian said:

Coming nearer to home I found this pithy explanation of the rationale behind the governement's pronouncements:

 

7c5d5f2026ca01393d3d005056a9545d

 

I find myself listening to two singing duos, that do not always seem to be working from the same song book. These being Whitty & Valance and Johnson & Hancock.

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13 hours ago, sem34090 said:

For whom exactly?! I'm currently stuck in Bognor Regis and unable to return to Wales. I'd much rather be there than here.

I believe that Bognor was identified by the Goodies as "the land of the living dead". 

Best wishes 

Eric  

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I found it hard to tell.

 

More kindly, the last time I was there was to take son to a footy tournament, and the weather was absolutely blazing-glorious, to the degree whereby I got severe sunburn while running the touch-line. I was so focused on protecting the boys from the sun that I forgot me!

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That said, the nickname of "Warsaw-on-Sea" has been used, both affectionately and otherwise. Personally, I couldn't care less but maybe find it sad that so many people have to live in this God-forsaken place!!

Edited by sem34090
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4 minutes ago, sem34090 said:

That said, the nickname of "Warsaw-on-Sea" has been used, both affectionately and otherwise. Personally, I couldn't care less but maybe find it sad that so many people have to live in this God-forsaken place!!

 

Being Poles, they will have brought God to it. See it as a process of sanctification as well as Polonisation.

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2 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

de jure, surely

 

I stand corrected by the bench. They are I suppose de facto English by their residence in England:

 

Englishman (n) a male native or inhabitant of England, or a man of English descent (i.e. of, in, or from).

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54 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

Being Poles, they will have brought God to it. See it as a process of sanctification as well as Polonisation.

 

If scattering a large quantity of Polonium around Bognor Regis does not sanctify it, I have no idea what will.

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7 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

 

de jure, surely

I guess they could be both.

But I've never seen Englishness as a purely ethnic thing. As long as you're repressed, sarcastic and constantly moaning about the weather, you are English in  my book.

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2 minutes ago, rocor said:

If scattering a large quantity of Polonium around Bognor Regis does not sanctify it, I have no idea what will.

 

I hadn't though of it in that Curieous way. The word associations in my mind were colonisation and pollinisation.

Edited by Compound2632
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3 minutes ago, Ian Simpson said:

As long as you're repressed, sarcastic and constantly moaning about the weather, 

 

That's Poles in my experience - but they may have picked up these traits as part of the naturalisation process.

Edited by Compound2632
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6 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

I stand corrected by the bench. They are I suppose de facto English by their residence in England:

 

Englishman (n) a male native or inhabitant of England, or a man of English descent (i.e. of, in, or from).

 

Well, we could both be right in that they're de jure British, for sure.  As British is a legal status not (just) a cultural and certainly not a racial designation.

 

What being English is, other than someone who identifies as such, is an interesting question. Also, if there is independence, being Scottish will no longer mean what it means now, but will also mean someone with Scottish citizenship; essentially the people who live in Scotland. I'm not sure Sean Connery has worked that out yet. 

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23 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

What being English is, other than someone who identifies as such, is an interesting question. Also, if there is independence, being Scottish will no longer mean what it means now, but will also mean someone with Scottish citizenship; essentially the people who live in Scotland. I'm not sure Sean Connery has worked that out yet. 

 

My English uncle and aunt, long-term residents of Bishopbriggs, have and are appalled. 

Edited by Compound2632
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24 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

Also, if there is independence, being Scottish will no longer mean what it means now, but will also mean someone with Scottish citizenship; essentially the people who live in Scotland. I'm not sure Sean Connery has worked that out yet. 

 

Sean Connery has already ascended to that immortal Scottish land above (from which all goodness eminates).

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I went to a university G&S Society production of Pinafore, in which the tenor was Welsh. This gave rise to some amusing stage business throughout that number, in which he capered about trying to be seen (he was Welsh and a tenor, so not tall) waving a Welsh flag.

 

But the line at which I crack up is: "Beautiful Mabel, I would if I could but I am not able." 

 

Which on looking up I realise is from Pirates, so the Society must have done that too. 

 

At school, I did the stage lighting for Ruddigore - lots of fun with green filters - in which the tenor was Paul Agnew, although this is, oddly, missing from his official bio. Scottish my foot - grew up in Sutton Coldfield. (Also not mentioned in his biog.)

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3 hours ago, Ian Simpson said:

I guess they could be both.

But I've never seen Englishness as a purely ethnic thing. As long as you're repressed, sarcastic and constantly moaning about the weather, you are English in  my book.

 

3 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

That's Poles in my experience - but they may have picked up these traits as part of the naturalisation process.

Then there’s the other three qualities the English share with the Poles:

We drink a lot, eat a lot of meat, and don’t want to be in Poland...

 

(Personally speaking, I have found them to be honest, hard-working, helpful and friendly, and can’t see why anyone would complain.)

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