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Proceedings of the Castle Aching Parish Council, 1905


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7 minutes ago, Welchester said:

 

 

We (the students who were temporary summer workers at UCCA in the 1980s) used to have such fun mangling the four or five letter university codes: MANC was obvious, UMIST became 'You Missed' and LBRO (Loughborough) was 'Lowbrow'.

 

There's a school of thought that Terry Pratchetts "Lancre" is a mangling of the code for Lancaster....

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I studied a masters there, with week-long blocks of tuition, and I always travelled-up on a Sunday, on a train that was always diverted, and always took long enough to read an entire Sunday 'paper, including all the supplements, timing arrival to coincide with the world's cheapest and tastiest "all you can eat" buffet at the on-campus Indian restaurant - a large bowl of daal is more delicious than any chip-shop peas, but has the same unfortunate repercussions. 

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5 hours ago, Edwardian said:

This amused me ....

 

 

I had a patient who worked for HMRC.  He was sent down to London at one point to help out in an office there.  The only person who spoke to him in the office was an Indian gentleman!   I recall being at a 2MM SA do in Newcastle and there was a young London couple at our table at the dinner.  the wife commented on the fact that shop assistants had carried on conversation with her.  Our reaction was 'so?'!

 

Jim

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3 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

I took soon for a day out to Manchester, and on the basis of that one visit he decided he wanted to go to uni there when the time comes, because people were so randomly friendly. 

C'mon, Manchester's not 'The North'!  You're almost into the 'deep south' there, or at least the northern edge of the Midlands.   Newcastle, Carlisle, that's getting North!

 

Jim

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2 minutes ago, Caley Jim said:

C'mon, Manchester's not 'The North'!  You're almost into the 'deep south' there, or at least the northern edge of the Midlands.   Newcastle, Carlisle, that's getting North!

 

Jim

 

Agree. From where I sit, the South starts at York!

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There are other local differences :-

On a flying (literally) visit to Glasgow.......

 

1. Sunny dawn at East Midlands  landed in Snow at Glasgow

 

2. I asked to be shown examples of  potential suppliers precision casting process . was told none in stock, the last had been collected a few minutes earlier, by a courier  " You must have seen him. Had the look of a Catholic about him"

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3 hours ago, Edwardian said:

 

I worked in Manchester for five years. I'm trying to recall it in bright, dry conditions.

 

I can't.

Five years ? You were lucky ! I worked at Manchester Univ. for 16 years...

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1 hour ago, DonB said:

1. Sunny dawn at East Midlands  landed in Snow at Glasgow

That's nothing.  When I was courting my wife I could leave my parent's house just west of Coatbridge in rain.  By the time I got to the centre of Coatbridge it would be sleet, at the Coatbridge/Airdrie boundary it would be snowing and by the time I got to her house there would be snow lying.  A 5 mile journey with a c300ft difference in height!

 

1 hour ago, DonB said:

  " You must have seen him. Had the look of a Catholic about him"

To be able to tell that is a required skill in the Glasgow area!

 

Jim

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4 hours ago, Edwardian said:

 

Agree. From where I sit, the South starts at York!

 

The south starts at Bawtry (and the north when you cross the Tees).

 

Adrian

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2 hours ago, CKPR said:

I worked at Manchester Univ. for 16 years...

I was a student in Preston for 3 years. A trip to Manchester (or indeed anywhere, including the Lakes) meant visiting somewhere drier.

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I was brought up to believe the North started at Potter's Bar. Actually the word was that civilisation ended at PB which I took to be much the same thing...

 

I now live in Norfolk AKA the North East.

 

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4 hours ago, wagonman said:

I was brought up to believe the North started at Potter's Bar. Actually the word was that civilisation ended at PB which I took to be much the same thing...

 

Correct, for the appropriate choice of direction from which to approach Potters Bar.

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When I was younger (so much younger than today) I never nee... No, I used to believe that a visit to my Grandmother in Leighton Buzzard (from my home at the Western end of Surrey)  constituted a trip to the North as at that age it was probably the furthest North I'd travelled. However, there was more to it than that - I was loosely aware of different accents by that point and my grandmother, being a native of Bradford, also had a 'Generically Northern' accent, thus completing the impression of further travel.

 

At any rate, we were outside of Metroland so it must've been the North... ;)

 

Nowadays I'm living in Aberystwyth for as much of the time as I can with a hope to move further inland to better-connected Machynlleth longer term. I'm never quite sure where Wales falls within the greater North/South divide but within Wales I'm pretty sure it's marked by the Dyfi (Dovey), which passes Machynlleth just to the North of the railway station. 

 

Currently I'm off the scale, in terms of the South. My involvement with managing a railway heritage project saw me visit Havenstreet (Isle of Wight) for some essential business Yesterday and I've had to stay the night in Ryde before returning North. Unfortunately I was the only committee member available for the perilous trip.

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17 hours ago, Edwardian said:

 

Agree. From where I sit, the South starts at York!

North/Southness is a mixture of state of mind and location.  If you're north of the "southern counties" and don't even sound a little of the Birmingham connurbation, you probably have a Northern tendancy.  Personally, I've always viewed Stoke-on-Trent as being on the northern fringes of the Midlands.

 

Flat caps and whippets help as an indicator too.

 

Edited by Hroth
Forgotten letters...
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The North Midland Railway ran through the counties of Derby and York, so evidently those are both Midland counties.

 

Now, I know the Lancashire, Derbyshire & East Coast railway didn't have any mileage in Lancashire, but that's not the point.

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As a Midlander by birth and half blood, and Northerner by half blood and adoption, I tend to believe that two things subsist simultaneously.

 

1. There is a North-South border. It is close to where I grew up and its course thereabouts is the Trent.

 

2. At the same time, there is a very definite Midlands.  My familiarity is more with central to north midlands; the south Midlands are much less familiar. It's a matter of subjective perception, but I would put North Staffs, Cheshire, Derbyshire, North Lincs as 'North Midland'.  The North does not start to feel Just North as opposed to Midland & North until I hit Lancashire and Yorkshire. 

 

That said, the North I inhabit (physically and mentally) feels distinctive from points further south; not Yorkshire wholly, but the North Riding, together with County Durham, Cumberland, Westmorland and Northumberland. 

 

2 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

Then there's the Great pointing-in-a-Northerly-direction Railway...

 

The Great Hertfordshire Railway? Yes, I've travelled that many a time! 

 

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I live in the land of the North Folk, very much different to the South fFolk

Anyone north or west of us, is Furriners..

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