Jump to content

Proceedings of the Castle Aching Parish Council, 1905


Recommended Posts

8 minutes ago, monkeysarefun said:

Here the further north you go the more like the deep south it gets.

 

And you cant go in the water  without risk of painful death..

But you can at least enjoy the sound of duelling banjos whilst you die...

  • Funny 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, monkeysarefun said:

Here the further north you go the more like the deep south it gets.

 

 

 

Well, obviously, because you're upside down

  • Agree 1
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 2
  • Funny 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Regularity said:

But you can at least enjoy the sound of duelling banjos whilst you die...

Queenslanders aren't very musical.

 

 

I hit one with a stick once and it just went 'tonk'...

Edited by monkeysarefun
  • Informative/Useful 2
  • Funny 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Hroth said:

North/Southness is a mixture of state of mind and location. 

 

I went to the LSE as a post-grad in the mid-1980s and was regarded as a surprisingly articulate and cultured barbarian from the Northern wastelands of Cumbria and Durham. A new acquaintance, who I should say is still a friend, opined that she had been to 'the North' as she had once visited Aylesbury. I politely pointed out that Aylesbury used to be served by the Metropolitan.

Edited by CKPR
  • Like 3
  • Funny 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Edwardian said:

1. There is a North-South border. It is close to where I grew up and its course thereabouts is the Trent.

 

2. At the same time, there is a very definite Midlands.  My familiarity is more with central to north midlands; the south Midlands are much less familiar. It's a matter of subjective perception, but I would put North Staffs, Cheshire, Derbyshire, North Lincs as 'North Midland'.  The North does not start to feel Just North as opposed to Midland & North until I hit Lancashire and Yorkshire. 

Linguistically, the north-south isogloss is the River Welland between Northamptonshire (soft 'a', "Barth") and Leicestershire (hard 'a', "Ba'th").

 

But over the past 30 years, Leicestershire has become increasingly a residence for people needing easy access to London, if not everyday (as commuters) then frequently for business trips, etc. This suggests a certain amount of agreement in the boundary being more along the Severn-Trent axis. Even Lincolnshire now gets included in the "South", but amusingly Loughborough doesn't (from the University of Sheffield, which is a city I always think of as being closer to a North Midlands rather than Yorkshire type of place):

spacer.png

 

But of course, there was also the "other" SMJ: the Scottish Midland Junction Railway, which became part of the mighty Caledonian. That was located around Perth and north of Dundee: my Dundonian partner has definite views about being a "proper" Scot. (Easy way to create an argument: simply say, "Dundee is not part of the Highlands".) Creates a whole different perspective - sorry, Caley Jim, but Lanarkshire makes you a "southerner" in her eyes at least!

Edited by Regularity
  • Like 4
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, monkeysarefun said:

Queenslanders aren't very musical.

So a banjo would be quite suited to them... ;)

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
  • Funny 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

To put a twist on this, as a Bristle Born Lad, Bristol is definitely West Country. I believe that the East - West divide is a line between Swindon and Southampton. North of Swindon/ Oxford being Midlands 

  • Like 3
  • Agree 2
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Hroth said:

 

Which one?

 

Proper Manchester Uni

UMIST

or

Whatever they're calling the old Poly at the moment....

 

Did you tell him about the rain?

 

There was a reason for the old Manchester bands to wander about in shapeless grey overcoats!

 

 

Such an excellent name, The Shapeless Grey Overcoat Brass Band.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, monkeysarefun said:

Here the further north you go the more like the deep south it gets.

 

And you cant go in the water  without risk of painful death..

 

 

Ahem.....

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Apologies if I have posted these thoughts sometime and somewhere else:

 

There used to be a Blue road sign on the Doncaster Bypass (A1M - earliest part) at the bridge over the River Don  - 'The North'

 

My view having been granted asylum from the 'south' in 1989, is that County Durham and Northumberland form 'the North' (possibly with the addition of some counties west of the High Hills.)

North is home.

South is south of the Tees

South of the Humber is Further South

South of the Trent (at least on the A1) is Far South

South of the Thames (and indeed the entire Thames basin) is Furthest South.

 

There have to be some exceptions and to respect the views of my brother, the South West (as in Devon and Cornwall) is not really South at all.

 

Having said all that, the longest time I have been away from 'home' was nearly a year in West Africa.

Flying home from Schiphol to Newcastle (I always try to get a starboard seat for that journey) and crossing over the Humber estuary I was swept away by tears at seeing Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, not to mention Spurn.

 

Edited by drmditch
  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

To a native of the West Midlands, there is absolutely no doubt about what constitutes the North and what the South. Staffordshire is definitely northern once one gets up to Stafford, whilst Warwickshire becomes distinctly southern once one gets into the Cotswolds.

 

On the other hand, now living south of the Thames and pining for my native forests, anywhere north of that river seems more homely. 

 

On the third hand, I deeply envy those of you in your truly northern fastnesses.

Edited by Compound2632
superfluous "the" removed
  • Like 3
  • Agree 2
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're North of Wales, then you're northern....

 

I wonder if you can have "South Northern", rather like those of Scottish ilk who partition themselves into Highlands amd Lowlands?

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, monkeysarefun said:

Here the further north you go the more like the deep south it gets.

That's because you folk are all the other way up!  :jester:

 

Jim

  • Like 2
  • Informative/Useful 1
  • Funny 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Canal Digger said:

To put a twist on this, as a Bristle Born Lad, Bristol is definitely West Country. I believe that the East - West divide is a line between Swindon and Southampton. North of Swindon/ Oxford being Midlands 

The A5 forms another linguistic boundary, this time between East and West. It is most pronounced in Northamptonshire, around Towcester, to the extent that older people have different accents depending on which side of the road they grew up on, even from the same village.

People from Berkshire and Oxfordshire also sound "West Country" to other ears, although more and more of the country sounds like Eastenders.

  • Agree 3
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Caley Jim said:

C'mon, Manchester's not 'The North'!  You're almost into the 'deep south' there, or at least the northern edge of the Midlands.   Newcastle, Carlisle, that's getting North!

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Regularity said:

People from Berkshire and Oxfordshire also sound "West Country" to other ears, 

 

Hum. That does depend on whereabouts in Berkshire you're listening. Slough, for instance...

 

One of my sons has been playing an on-line game with his friends, GeoGuessr, in which one has to work out the location you've been dropped using Google Earth. If the photos show shop signs in Polish and Arabic, it must be Slough.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
  • Funny 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Canal Digger said:

To put a twist on this, as a Bristle Born Lad, Bristol is definitely West Country. I believe that the East - West divide is a line between Swindon and Southampton. North of Swindon/ Oxford being Midlands 

And thus the M&SWJR may been seen as the true East-West divide... Either that or the DN&SR.

Edited by sem34090
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

If the photos show shop signs in Polish and Arabic, it must be Slough.

Ah, so somebody does want it, then?

  • Agree 1
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
  • Funny 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a school in Inverness you were almost all southerners.

When I was at school in the outer Hebrides or Northern Ireland. you were all easterners.

When I was working in the Falklands you were all northerners including the Anzacs.

Now you're all westerners.

 

You lot stop moving around..

 

 

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Funny 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Regularity said:

Creates a whole different perspective - sorry, Caley Jim, but Lanarkshire makes you a "southerner" in her eyes at least!

As far as Scotland is concerned i have no problem with that, but I bet that in this discussion we'd both be on the same side!

 

4 hours ago, drmditch said:

Flying home from Schiphol to Newcastle (I always try to get a starboard seat for that journey) and crossing over the Humber estuary I was swept away by tears at seeing Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, not to mention Spurn.

Would you not need to be on the port (left) side to see the east coast of England?

 

Jim

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, sem34090 said:

And thus the M&SWJR may been seen as the true East-West divide... 

So I lived in the east  and went to school in the west at ludgershall.?

Ooh arrr..

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Caley Jim said:

As far as Scotland is concerned i have no problem with that, but I bet that in this discussion we'd both be on the same side!

Not just in the respect of geography: we'd both be wrong... ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Caley Jim said:

As far as Scotland is concerned i have no problem with that, but I bet that in this discussion we'd both be on the same side!

 

Would you not need to be on the port (left) side to see the east coast of England?

 

Jim

 

Well, any of the flight paths have to cross the coast eventually, so depending on cloud cover, either side should eventually give a view of the coast.

It does depend on the cloud though. On that occasion the first shape I remember seeing was Spurn, so we were probably over Lincolnshire on a NW heading. Certainly the cloud cleared fully and we had a good view of the Humber, Kingston-upon-Hull, and I think a bit later the Ouse and the City of York.

 

On other occasions (I used to fly that route regularly) we approached land in other places. The flightpath probably also varies by the wind direction at Newcastle. Sometimes after approaching over County Durham, we would go out to sea again, and turn over St Mary's Island. Once I got a good view of Durham city itself (recognisable from the air). Coming home after a long time away was always an emotional experience, and England is so green!

 

I enjoy flying, in a comfortable seat with a good book and a gin-and-tonic (depending on what one has to do after landing).

My imagination may run away with me, but over the southern North Sea or Essex and Kent (and once on 15th September), and watching through windows with ice tendrils forming on the edges, the hazy sun emerging from cloud, one has to think of the young men for whom that was the last thing they saw.

 

Edited by drmditch
  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Hroth said:

If you're North of Wales, then you're northern....

 

I wonder if you can have "South Northern", rather like those of Scottish ilk who partition themselves into Highlands amd Lowlands?

 

Would the local railway company then be, The Great Northern and Southern Railway. The locomotive superintendent of, not being able to make his mind up if the livery of the engines should be brown or green.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rocor said:

....... The locomotive superintendent of, not being able to make his mind up if the livery of the engines should be brown or green.

Do blue and black not come into the decision making process then?  Or does that make it too complicated for him?   :jester:

 

Jim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.