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Hello! I'm getting to the Signaling part of my layout and I'm stumped. After looking at a few threads I was starting to get it, but I think I need the opinions of people who know what they're talking about. I have attached a (admittedly terrible, as the track planning system I was using wasn't cooperating) diagram of the layout as it isn't fit for eyes. I'll accept the criticisms to it, but in short it's a shrunken down attempt at a GWR branchline terminus. I was wondering what, if any, signals I may have to put in?

snapshot.png.eb45f8065bf5e0f83f0c7f33b5906700.png

Thanks,

 

Ryan

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In that case, a fixed distant and one engine in steam.  If there is a passenger service then the first turnout would have a facing point lock (FPL), unlocked by an Anetts key,  you could possibly have a ground frame with all levers and could either be in a cabin or open to elements.

 

 

Edited by Siberian Snooper
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Of course, some (many?) small GWR BLTs did retain their full signalling into BR times and they are more satisfying for the modeller than a single, off-scene fixed distant. (Right, Ryan? :wink_mini:)

 

In that case, you need a Home signal at the toe of the rightmost points, a starting signal where I assume there is a platform (near 525,525) a ground disc (near the Home signal) reading into the run round loop and what I assume to be a goods siding and a ground disc reading out of the loop onto the main line. (That last ground disc would in reality be associated with a trap point, which is not shown on your diagram.)

 

You may or may not also have a ground disc reading out of the loco release spur onto the run round loop, depending on whether the crossover is operated by a ground frame or from the signal box.

 

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8 minutes ago, Harlequin said:

Of course, some (many?) small GWR BLTs did retain their full signalling into BR times and they are more satisfying for the modeller than a single, off-scene fixed distant. (Right, Ryan? :wink_mini:)

 

In that case, you need a Home signal at the toe of the rightmost points, a starting signal where I assume there is a platform (near 525,525) a ground disc (near the Home signal) reading into the run round loop and what I assume to be a goods siding and a ground disc reading out of the loop onto the main line. (That last ground disc would in reality be associated with a trap point, which is not shown on your diagram.)

 

You may or may not also have a ground disc reading out of the loco release spur onto the run round loop, depending on whether the crossover is operated by a ground frame or from the signal box.

 

And you also need a trap point out of the loop/siding.  I wonder how many stations that small retained a full set of signals (if they had ever had them in the first place) into later years.  In most cases, as 'Bécasse' as said, from the 1930s onwards economy would have seen such things removed although some definitely retained signals in the 1950s - although not any that  small that i can think of offhand.

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50 minutes ago, The Stationmaster said:

 - although not any that  small that i can think of offhand.

Highworth comes immediately to my mind, which retained a Home and Starting signal to its end in the 1960s. It also had point indicators (very rare by that time) at the entry and exit from the run-round loop but no ground signal at the exit from the siding. It probably retained its signalling because it was actually cheaper not to make changes - and the signalling would have been ripped out if renewals had been required or if doing so would have reduced staff (porter-signalman) costs. It was also a bit of an oddity because it still retained the same layout originally inspected and approved as a light railway under the 1866 Act (which probably explains the lack of a ground signal at the exit from the siding).

 

However, I wouldn't take it as prototype inspiration for a model unless you know what you are doing, even though 1866 Act light railways were far more common than many might suppose. (The LSWR's original route into Bournemouth was one, for example.)

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