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Locomotive 'open cab' canvas weather covers


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Hi Guys,i have several GWR 'open cab' locomotives,and am trying to find someone who can supply canvas cab weather covers (rolled up and to fit just under the inside of the cab roof) to add a touch more realism.

     Failing that,has anyone ever made them from scratch ?

                                       Thanks.    Greg Brown.

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5 hours ago, greggieboy said:

Hi Guys,i have several GWR 'open cab' locomotives,and am trying to find someone who can supply canvas cab weather covers (rolled up and to fit just under the inside of the cab roof) to add a touch more realism.

     Failing that,has anyone ever made them from scratch ?

                                       Thanks.    Greg Brown.

What scale? I have some in 7mm.

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I’ve used painted tin foil, which looks good but it’s very delicate and tears easily.  It would be fine for rolled up canvas stowed under the back of the cab roof, though; I tried it on a 2721 in use, attached to the hooks sticking up from the rear corners of the bunker, a sort of sports car convertible look.  This loco has a plastic moulding to represent the cover in it’s rolled up state. 
 

For a tender loco it needs to be flexible enough to deal with whatever curvature you operate with.  Years ago I fitted an Airfix Dean Goods with a cover made of Boots’ own brand sticking plaster, the weight of loco and tender being sufficient to ensure good performance on curves.  This attracted much favourable comment at shows.  
 

If you are modelling the canvas weather sheet rolled up, it is secured by leather straps and buckles, 2 of them IIRC, which compress the rolled canvas slightly.

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21 hours ago, chuffinghell said:

What about thin lead foil

The type that used to be used on wine bottles?  Good idea.  I've got some of them tucked away somewhere (!) and I will need a tarp for my Dean Goods.

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On 27/10/2020 at 14:30, Steamport Southport said:

 

That's because he was told to ask here.....

No if you read my response on the other thread I said

 

"you MIGHT have got a better response if you had posted it here"

 

not that I had told you post it here I was trying to be helpfull and not ordering you to!

Edited by Londontram
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I was wondering if the 'Tunnocks Wrapper' approach to tarpaulins might work?  I've got a few set aside so might have a go this afternoon.

 

I'll be back!

 

But don't stay up to late...............

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Is there any 'standard' way of mounting the cab canvases onto the loco when not in use?  I've been looking through book photos for Dean Goods especially - including my chosen 2538 which, as one of the last examples running, was often photographed.  This loco seems to have spent a lot of time with the canvas extended onto the tender (as is its purpose in life), the mid Wales weather probably being the reason!  However, other locos have it rolled under the back edge, spread over the cab roof etc.  I suppose trying to find your prototype loco in photos and modelling what you see is the way to go.

 

BTW, I made one up from Tunnocks wrapper, 30 x 20mm, painted Tamiya Rubber Black - and it looks pretty acceptable to me.  Photo to follow.

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The sheet is modelled rolled and strapped on my Hornby 2721, not the most hi-fi of RTR offerings but it get’s that bit right.  For some reason she’s inverted herself in this shot.  The canvas weather sheet is thin aluminium, obtained, screwed up, straightened out, and superglued together then cut to size with a kitchen scissors from tealight holders, then painted a rough brown-black sort of mix. 
 

The hooks are simply bits of stiff wire superglued to the inside back corners of the bunker, and small holes drilled in the corners of the sheet to represent the eyelets.  The sheet is placed on the hooks by threading them through the eyelets, superglued in what looks to be the right place, and the excess wire trimmed off, then you superglue to the rear of the cab roof. 

 

 

 

D542E615-82B5-49E6-833B-6B5562AE5991.jpeg

Edited by The Johnster
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