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Glasgow area Stabling point c.1970 (as yet unnamed)


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This is intended as an analogue, DC, OO "lockdown" test layout for home use, measuring 5'4" x 12" plus a small fiddle yard (yet to be started). It could conceivably go to local shows in future if invited, though it probably won't have the "wow" factor of those Depot layouts featuring DCC sound effects. As such, the stock which is likely to see most use is that which usually runs on "Crinan" (which is currently, due to Covid rules, out of bounds up at the Club), along with my small industrial loco collection.

 

Although being built as a DMU / Loco fuelling and stabling point, the basic loco sidings could alternatively be used as wagon repair sidings, or even industrial use (as they disappear under a bridge to whatever lies beyond), to satisfy my industrial and shunting cravings. 

 

Location wise it will be set on the Eastern side of Glasgow, just off a main line, where an old track formation has been repurposed. The back wall of a Carriage Depot will largely form the backscene, with one siding being slightly raised for static coaching stock, effectively to form part of the backscene.

 

So far, track has been laid and wired, and SEEP point motors fitted. I have tried to aim for a flowing look to the track work, rather than using small radius points to fit more in. A control panel has yet to be started. Wiring is arranged to allow both a handheld controller and the control panel to be mounted on the front or the rear of the layout. A start has been made on the few structures required, namely a bridge at either end and the fuelling point. A small office and a hut or 2 are the only buildings needed, plus the aforementioned Carriage Shed wall.

 

Progress so far:

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View of the whole layout; left (rear) to right (front) shows the raised Carriage Siding, Fuelling Point area, and exit road, with the loco sidings at the far end nearer the front.

 

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Bridge forming the "fiddle yard" scenic break. The end of a row of shops/tenements might be added to the front corner, though only the rear will be visible from normal angles.

 

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Bridge at the Loco sidings end.

 

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Another view of the bridge at the sidings end.

 

The road bridges are slightly inclined to clear the rear, raised Carriage Siding; this was done mainly to aid photography and add, hopefully, a little perceived depth.

 

Thanks for looking. More soon hopefully......

 

Martyn.

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I like this a lot. There were so many of these sorts of places in the period you are modelling. A delight for those of us on a train trip continually scouring for numbers, always hoping there wouldn't be something parked in the way to obscure our view! Plus somewhere you had to go on a shed bash to catch that elusive shunter.

 

All gone now of course, sad really that you can go on quite a long journey today and barely see a loco. Something called progress!

 

John.

Edited by John Tomlinson
typo
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Before I can add much in the way of ballast I am adding a few balsa walkways and foot crossings, of the old slippery wooden planked variety. 

20201115_163009.jpg.2888dc63965268be63e59714ec7cafb5.jpg20201115_162959.jpg.edd10dd5809983547f5e2b709ce284c8.jpg

 

Elsewhere, particularly away from the fuelling point, Staff will have to walk on the usual oil soaked ash/ballast/filth mix which still pervaded Stabling Points, sheds etc c.1970.

 

Once any edges have been touched in I can continue with newish ballast around the newish fuelling point, and some sort of sludge concoction for the other sidings.

 

I am quite pleased with how things are looking so far.

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Work on stock is carrying on slowly too, but I'm not in any rush.

 

Martyn.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Initial ballasting is almost complete, prior to further refining, will add photos tomorrow.

 

In the meantime, a Heljan 26/1 has been added to the fleet:

20201124_155845.jpg.ccf99d5ddc0624041ff6bad0a1d7259f.jpg

 

A Bachmann 24/1 arrived today, but that is a Xmas present from my good lady, so I don't know about it, ahem!

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A mix of "fairly recent" and "steam age yard ash and clinker" ballast.

20201126_225833.jpg.ec21ded27b26e98e9da2ccf97a5e4504.jpg20201126_225921.jpg.231524e893e5e5893251f09f28290867.jpg

The older stuff will be experimented with to give it more oily, muddy, and worn, smoother effects befitting the sort of appearance of old stabling sidings of the period.

 

The rear track needs some holes in the polystyrene base filling before adding "recent" ballast. 

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Coming on very nicely Martyn, when i did my diesel shed i joked with my dad i should mix a bit of diesel into the ballast to give it a bit more 'atmosphere' didnt go down too well with his missus though!

 

Top work as ever.

All the best

James

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On 09/11/2020 at 00:10, Signaller69 said:

The red fuel pump shelters are based on Grangemouth, the corrugated one loosely on Inverness.

Because rain falls vertically in Grangemouth but horizontally in Inverness?

Like what your doing, glad you put the link in Crinan or I might have missed for even longer.

Paul.

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1 hour ago, 5BarVT said:

Because rain falls vertically in Grangemouth but horizontally in Inverness?

Like what your doing, glad you put the link in Crinan or I might have missed for even longer.

Paul.

I think it must fall harder in Grangemouth, the real shelter had lost all but 1 small roof panel in the photo I was working from. As much use as a brolley with no covering...

Inverness clearly took no such chances!

Edited by Signaller69
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Not a lot of progress this week, but I have been experimenting with adding "grot" to the old ballast in the stabling sidings, using ready to use filler with black acrylic paint and PVA to dilute it to a thinner paste, dabbed on with a brush and "soot" weathering powder sprinkled onto the still wet surface, again dabbed into it by brush. Useful work, but not quite there yet, and in need of more black for spilt oil effects.20201203_224920.jpg.b55f785c59a944cf02d430f41db2c6e3.jpg

I'm thinking a little DAS clay as per the Chris Nevard method will help, followed by more paint and a final quick pass over the top with a matt black aerosol, with a little satin varnish in places to give a wet look.

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That's looking good, the DAS clay idea would add another layer and looking at the pic below you are definitely getting the oily and greasy look. 

Not sure if this helps but I was going through some ideas/pictures for my layout and came across this, I took it for reference at Norwich station.

 

20171005_114519.jpg.d098d5ec811582fac2953e92dad2dd5e.jpg

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This is excellent.  The trackwork looks nice and smooth and is well laid and the grotty ballast is well realised.

 

I especially like the carriage sidings sitting at a different level.

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

Best

 

Scott.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Work on the layout has stopped for Christmas (my good lady requires the dining area restored to its primary function) and it has been consigned to the loft for a week or two. 

 

Hopefully I might be able to get a few details made up, such as a small signing on building and the fuel pumps etc, or some rolling stock work carried out, time permitting.

 

Season's greetings to all.

 

Martyn.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have knocked up a small office building over Christmas, which will serve as a signing on point for the stabling sidings.

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It is a simple card shell with self adhesive brick paper, a roof cut from a Barleycorn embossed tiles sheet, Ancorton windows and some spare Peco doors, bargeboards and guttering with Wills Chimney pots. Just needs the downspouts and glazing adding and a little toning down now. 

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