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Hi all,

 

What do people use to cut the nice slide fit fine tubing Albion Alloys produce without turning the profile into an egg?

 

I've got the normal copper pipe cutter but that doesn't go anything like small enough and I haven't been able to find a modellers equivalent. I need to produce a number of repeatable short stubs and I don't feel the jewelers saw is the right tool for the job even with a very fine blade.

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It depends on the size you are working with but FWIW I managed some decent repeat cuts of some 0.7mm o/d brass tube with a utility knife. The trick was to have some 0.5mm wire inside the tube to keep it from collapsing while the blade was rolled over the tube.

 

HTH

 

David

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I use my own take on the pipe vice I got very intimate with when I was an apprentice knocking up electrical conduit...

 

I have cut a V groove into a small block of wood, and line it with rubber band for very good grip and adjusting the depth of the groove to suit smaller diameter pieces. The rod/tube is held in place with another piece of wood lined with cork on top (again for grip, but also protects from deformities from over clamping) and I make the cut with a razor saw. Doing it this way I find is also a good way to multi-purpose it as a jig for making multiple identical cuts.

 

If its particularly thin walled tube I'll slide a suitably sized smaller rod into the tube to support it while I make the cut.

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4 hours ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

One of these is useful too;

 

http://www.hobbyholidays.co.uk/proddetail.php?prod=EXTUBECUT

 

Mike.

I use one of these and a fine tooth razor saw to cut large numbers of spacers and bearing tubes for the kits I produce. There is a lockable back stop so repeating the same length is a doddle , it is designed so that you can also unscrew the handle and mount it in a vice too, made what used to be a real chore easy. 

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On 03/11/2020 at 18:47, Gordon A said:

Hold the tube in a pin vice and either use a piercing saw or a slitting disc. Cut to over length and file back to length again using a pin vice with a file.

I hold the pin vice horizontally in the vice and slip a small drill into the tube while cutting with a piercing saw (or a razor saw).  It will rotate as the blade goes through the side wall, at which point loosen the pin vice in the vice jaws and turn it a bit to present fresh metal to the saw. 

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45 minutes ago, 5050 said:

I hold the pin vice horizontally in the vice and slip a small drill into the tube while cutting with a piercing saw (or a razor saw).  It will rotate as the blade goes through the side wall, at which point loosen the pin vice in the vice jaws and turn it a bit to present fresh metal to the saw.   The cut slice of tube will be held by the drill - and shouldn't be devoured by the carpet monster......

Er, sumfin funny 'appened there.................

 

I reckon I must'a clicked 'quote' rather than 'edit'.

 

It's me age yer know.....................

Edited by 5050
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Hi all,

As mentioned earlier here by 

On 03/11/2020 at 18:17, davknigh said:

It depends on the size you are working with but FWIW I managed some decent repeat cuts of some 0.7mm o/d brass tube with a utility knife. The trick was to have some 0.5mm wire inside the tube to keep it from collapsing while the blade was rolled over the tube.

 

HTH

 

David

Hi all, I do the same as davknigh. I slip a piece of steel wire inside and cut round that.

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