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Peco point, which point motor? (7mm)


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I've always used seep pm1 point motors on previous 00 and indeed my ( slightly failed) first attempt at an 0 gauge layout.

Mainly as I had them here. But of a fiddle to set up but generally work ok.

 

Now mk2 - 0 gauge layout is under development and it will have five points that need control / switching.

Not looking for dcc control even though the layout is dcc,but not ruling it out with just 5 points.

 

Question is what is better than the old pm1 seep point motor??

 

Looking at ease of fitting and good control of switching.

 

I thank you

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Tortoise.  
 

Upside:  Slow, quiet, realistic movement.  doesn't bang your points.  easy to fit.  two built-in polarity switches, Totally reliable 

 

Downside:  relatively expensive, quite large, needs about 3” height below the baseboard

 

I bought some around 20 years ago, and they’ve been through 1 layout and are now on the second.  I understand that Cobalt do a similar motor, and both Tortoise and cobalt offer a DCC version, but have no experience of them.

 

Hth

Simon

Edited by Simond
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I second the Tortoise. As Simon says, reliable. I have more than a dozen.

 

Unlike the snap-switches sold by Peco and Seep etc, where the power to the motor is momentary, these have power on at all times. They use a tiny current holding the switch rail to the stock rail. Reliable? Mine have been under continuous power, network power outages apart, for at least 13 years. I never turn them off. One small 12v power supply looks after many. 

 

If you have a crossover, you can make one end a simple slave to the other, so first one point moves over, and then the other, which is much more prototypical. Easy to do using those built in changeover switches. 

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Hello my two-pence worth.

I am looking at changing from mechanical point control over to electrical point motors but which ones?

My checks have shown me this when comparing solenoid type to spinning motor type [Tortoise].

My reason for changing over is to make them easily replaceable on failure, remove the need to clamber under my boards as I'm not as young as I was and I quite fancy having a switch wired control panel as it is simples.  I have considered making the T's more of a plug in system using push fit choc block so they could be made up on the bench and fitted underneath and plugged in.

To that end I am also strongly considering having the Point motors mounted on the top surface:

 

Upside:  Tortoise are all Simon says but top surface point motors will suit me better.

Downside: However T's spinning motor whirrs away and is there for a longer time when compared to the clack - clack of a solenoid type.  They are just too big for me, the point motors can easily be hidden on the surface with debris, buildings etc, which I expect will also calm down their noise somewhat and I have never heard a point throw quietly any way.  Also my layout is DCC too.

 

I'm about to experiment with some PL1's to see how reliable they are, how noisy they are.  I have read that they struggle to throw point in my scale which is 0 gauge but then others have said 16Vac is more reliable or 12Vdc via a stonking CDU, similar to Gauge masters version.  Poor operation will decide which way I should go.

 

Best

Edited by Barnaby
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I second the comments on Tortoise, mine are on their second layout and have given great service.

 

I had some old Wabbits in stock so used them to make my Tortoises DCC operable.

 

Another product that I have had occasion to use and quite like are Blue Point point levers:

 

https://ngtrains.com/shop/product/blue-point-turnout-controller-5-pack/

 

Manual with polarity switch.

 

John

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Yes John that is how I am presently set up with the Bluepoint TOU switches.

But I am trying to avoid going under the boards and want to experiment with top surface mount point motors via a track plan switch unit.

So far I've not had any issues with the blue points but I have it in my head that using electrical switching will be better all round for me.

 

Best

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I totally get the desire to avoid going under the boards.  I have just relaid some track and turnouts and will need to dismantle and put the boards on their side in a Workmate to rewire.

 

Trying to work under the boards wearing progressive lenses is diabolical.

 

I am curious as to how you will disguise the above board TOUs though.

 

John

Edited by brossard
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10 minutes ago, brossard said:

I totally get the desire to avoid going under the boards.  I have just relaid some track and turnouts and will need to dismantle and put the boards on their side in a Workmate to rewire.

 

Trying to work under the boards wearing progressive lenses is diabolical.

 

I am curious as to how you will disguise the above board TOUs though.

 

John

 

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I've used the good old H&M solenoids, as they can & will keep a larger-scale point blade in place. 

 

I've got some of the newer Hattons solenoid point motors; 6 in total. The build quality is not as good as the old H&M, with a very sloppy action. One upside is the throw on these is less than the old H&M. There is no facility for frog switching. 

 

I bought some Cobalts  some years back, but I haven't used them yet.  I'd also like to try using the SG90 servo, but in a 'plain' format.  

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I've used Peco Twistlocks. Simplicity to install, no big holes or such - and easy to detach later if necessary, say for soldering. They work brilliantly with Peco points, which I guess shouldn't be a surprise, but are not really any good for my home made points since there's no over-centre spring a la Peco. I'm getting away with it, but a latching motor would be better there. The only slight concern I have is that the bodies of the solenoids are 'open' at the top, meaning ballast etc could drop down the  rod hole into the motor. So far anyway, that hasn't happened.

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