Jump to content

Cement train derailment in Sheffield


Recommended Posts

50 minutes ago, eastwestdivide said:

 

10807 visible in the pic above is from a batch built 1979-1981. I don't know if I've noticed any 4-digit ones on the Hope runs recently, which were 1973-4 - have they all gone? (Dates from the lists at LTSV)

I have noticed no. 11111 though!

 

More on the derailment via National Rail at:

https://www.nationalrail.co.uk/service_disruptions/259873.aspx 

leading to Network Rail's pics at:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1_9sU0PL10Jid1YDnpd_8ZDpNqOFUVzQe

 

They should all be 107xx, 108xx, 109xx numbered Vee tank/Centre depressed tanks along with the later straight barrel Metalair tanks in the 106xx or 11xxx ranges. All the early 9xxx series Blue Circle/APCM wagons were gradually scrapped from the mid 1990s onwards with a couple preserved at Weardale Railway I believe. One batch of 109xx wagons were scrapped as these had hand brake levers instead of wheels.

 

Cheers Paul

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, stewartingram said:

Heavy cement train? Good job DP2 wasn't still around then.....

Awful accident and it was a tragedy for those involved! 

     We often walk past the site of the crash at Gristhwaite farm, always think of what happened there and the concrete lineside hut you can see in some of the aftermath photos is still present!

Link to post
Share on other sites

In 1986 a Westbury to Exeter Central cement train formed of loaded PCAs was derailed at Cogload near Taunton. On that occasion the cause was a handbrake left on one of the wagons after departure from Westbury, BCC11104 was one of the vehicles damaged in that incident,

 

cheers 

  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, corneliuslundie said:

That's Ok, the BBC report refers to carriages.

Jonathan

But.....

Only repeating what the Network Rail Media Centre said....

 

'The derailment happened at about 2:45am, with a train carrying cement coming off the tracks while passing through platform one at the station. It was a slow speed derailment, but multiple carriages of the 34-car train have come off the tracks. There is no indication as to the cause at this time.'

 

https://www.networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/news/major-disruption-at-sheffield-station

Edited by EmporiaSub
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Gibbo675 said:

Hi Busman,

 

Look on the bright side, the tanks fell off the track near a road so at least they will have good access for a crane.

 

Gibbo.

The only slight complication is the River Sheaf culvert which runs under the road (Sheaf Street) and the railway pretty much where the derailed wagons are.

 

Andy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest news is that the “disruption will last for days”. In the case of the recent derailment in Kansas City (other thread on this site) the whole train was removed, damaged wagons taken off the line and damaged track relaid all in 24 hours. I sometimes think that in this country we spend too long thinking of reasons why things cannot be done rather than just getting on with the job, which was the spirit of the early railway pioneers. 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, 43110andyb said:

Awful accident and it was a tragedy for those involved! 

     We often walk past the site of the crash at Gristhwaite farm, always think of what happened there and the concrete lineside hut you can see in some of the aftermath photos is still present!

The report on the Thirsk accident is here:

 

https://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk/documents/MoT_Thirsk1967.pdf

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Hibelroad said:

Latest news is that the “disruption will last for days”. In the case of the recent derailment in Kansas City (other thread on this site) the whole train was removed, damaged wagons taken off the line and damaged track relaid all in 24 hours. I sometimes think that in this country we spend too long thinking of reasons why things cannot be done rather than just getting on with the job, which was the spirit of the early railway pioneers. 

 

According to National Rail Enquiries disruption is expected until Friday 13th November, so less than four days. Plus I doubt the Kansas City incident had to work around intensive passenger services, including some directly passing the site (through Single Line Working ?). 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, 43110andyb said:

Thanks for posting for those who haven’t seen and myself! I read the full report a few years ago now but had forgotten a few facts.

 

Yes, the thing that impressed me was how alert the driver of DP2 was, which meant that the emergency brake and sand were applied at the soonest possible moment.  His fast reactions meant that the train had slowed much more than it might otherwise have done, which must have saved lives.  The other railwaymen involved also carried out their duties diligently, the guard of the goods train rushing towards DP2 to warn them, but by that time the brake was already at emergency anyway.

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There's some discussion on a couple of FB staff groups saying the cause may have been a power surge causing a set of points moving under the train. A similar incient was possibly yhe cause of the fairly recent derailment at Eastleigh.

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, roythebus said:

There's some discussion on a couple of FB staff groups saying the cause may have been a power surge causing a set of points moving under the train. A similar incient was possibly yhe cause of the fairly recent derailment at Eastleigh.

 

Power surges do not cause points to move on their own!

 

If anything a power surge is more likely to blow fuses and stop things moving.

 

For a set of points to move by themselves several various relays in the interlocking need to change state - and that shouldn't be possible if the track circuit over the points is occupied or a route is locked in!

 

However there have been incidents where a combination of track and / or wheel issues have caused wagons to mechanically force the points across plus cases where derailed vehicles have smashed the point equipment up such that they open up and send subsequent wagons a different way.

Edited by phil-b259
  • Like 2
  • Agree 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold
16 hours ago, phil-b259 said:

 

Power surges do not cause points to move on their own!

 

If anything a power surge is more likely to blow fuses and stop things moving.

 

For a set of points to move by themselves several various relays in the interlocking need to change state - and that shouldn't be possible if the track circuit over the points is occupied or a route is locked in!

 

However there have been incidents where a combination of track and / or wheel issues have caused wagons to mechanically force the points across plus cases where derailed vehicles have smashed the point equipment up such that they open up and send subsequent wagons a different way.

Have a look at the RAIB website for the findings on the recent tanker crash and fire in S Wales for proof of the wheels issue. See https://www.gov.uk/government/news/derailment-and-fire-involving-a-tanker-train-at-llangennech-updated-21092020

Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, caradoc said:

National Rail Enquiries saying disruption is now expected until Tuesday 17th November. 

 

 

In the good old days the tinsley crane and maybe another from donny or toton would have had this mess cleared up a lot faster and the pway and s and t would be getting stuck into sorting out damage to infrastructure by now

The only potential fly in the ointment i can see with this is the so called megatron which carries the river sheaf under the station at this point 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold
1 minute ago, russ p said:

 

In the good old days the tinsley crane and maybe another from donny or toton would have had this mess cleared up a lot faster and the pway and s and t would be getting stuck into sorting out damage to infrastructure by now

 

I do tend to wonder why it takes so long these days to get the railway up and running again.

 

It it H&S, privatisation, a mix of both or is the railway generally so safe these days that those of the grades that would have previously attended are not there anymore?

 

Apologies for drifting off topic.

  • Agree 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is all about ‘BLAME’.....or Attribution as it is quaintly known, as we definitely don’t work in an industry that has a ‘Blame Culture’...:lol_mini:

 

Obviously it is no longer one company, it is a multitude of companies who depending if it is their Asset that has been directly affected or possibly indirectly affected will be checking their last maintenance records or if it is another TOC they will be seeing how much they are owed for the disruption etc. 
 

As it derailed moving through S&C NR would be as routine looking at the last S&T facing point lock (FPL) records, the last PWAY 053 facing switch inspection, S&C welding / grinding works, as well as the last dynamic track geometry runs through the patch and any other recent track maintenance on the patch. Also checking what sub contractors, sub sub contractors, sub sub sub contractors etc were undertaking the work. 
 

Wagon maintainers might well be checking their maintenance records, particularly for wheel sets, brakes etc. 
 

So it is not as straight forward as it used to be, but that’s just the way it is now. It is unlikely to ever change as lots of people are continuing to make lots and lots of money from running it this way. 
 

Edited by Grizz
Auto correct
  • Like 1
  • Agree 5
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.