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Aston On Clun. A Great Western might have been.


MrWolf
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1 hour ago, MrWolf said:

The face was the awkward bit, which full size is about the size of an egg.

Well, obviously!

 

We all remember "E for B and Georgie Best".

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Really glad you found the worth in sharing these pics. IMHO, I think they do have potential as commercial pieces. You're already selling, so that proves that there is a market for this work. Have you tried online galleries? I joined Artfinder for a couple of years, had a modicum of success there. But unfortunately, there are many thousands of artists there, so hard to stick out from the herd.

 

Jack Vettriano's painting, The Singing Butler, has been the best-selling image in Britain.

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Thanks for the information there, I quite like Vettriano's style and the fact that he annoys the contemporary art snobs who call him "paint by numbers" by continually selling a heap of paintings. I also like the style of David Uhl, but one of my big influences is the late Walter Molino.

 

crash-one.jpg.b92017f026c5f3b66f0d71c1e116bcbd.jpg

 

walter-molino-maria-callas-domenica-55_u-L-PSBDEP0.jpg.a7629ffa615212c1ceb8120614644f8c.jpg

I'll have a look at those two sites, there's no harm in signing up, it at least gets your work out there.

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30 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

and the fact that he annoys the contemporary art snobs who call him "paint by numbers" by continually selling a heap of paintings.

Anything that annoys the art snobs* has to be a good thing!

 

*also wine snobs, film critics...

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Posted (edited)

I once watched my mother's cousin paint one of his horse portraits, and he seemed to use a paint-by-numbers method, using the same colour in several small patches at at time. He does alright, though, selling to the Jockey Club and various affluent horse owners around the world.

 

Off topic annecdote:  A horsey friend of my mother's sent a Jockey Club charity Christmas card to us one year, then boasted later how 'charitable' she was in her choice of cards.  "Oh, I agree" says Mum, "it was painted by my cousin, Roy, and the two girls on the back are my nieces" - cue one open-mouthed friend.  :)  

Edited by Stubby47
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I love those awkward moments when someone is trying to score points and fails spectacularly. I had half a dozen paintings exhibited in a friend's gallery and on the opening night, one of her friends said sniffily, "Is that his dream girl then?" My friend replied, "No, she's over there."

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Hi

 

Thanks for sharing your work......

 

In my humble opinion I think they're excellent.....

Indeed I think your version of George Bests face is far more like the real one than the one in the original picture.....

 

It's easy to see how you produce such excellent models with that level of skill & observation.....

Thanks again

 

Cheers Bill

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I really like your pictures Rob, and I can also see the commercial potential of your work.

 

I wish you all the best in getting more commissions.

 

Al.

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Those are superb pictures. It is great that you felt able to share. There is a lot of (hidden) talent on RMWeb beyond the pure railway modelling area.


Good luck with getting your pictures to a wider (buying) audience. 

 

PS, picking up on your earlier point, earning brownie points from a partner/ wife's Mother is an art form all of its own. Particularly as I fell into the 'oh, really' class at first. Still, overcame that over the (nearly 40) years, earning plenty on the way. But not through commissioned paintings. I drew a cow for my 3 year old Granddaughter recently and was promptly told by her that it looked nothing like a cow.

 

Hysterics from the other adults in the room. That will give you an idea of my level of competence :) 

     

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Thanks everyone for your compliments and encouragement. As I've had to get up at stupid o'clock, (someone has her morning train to catch.) I've been talking a look at three paintings that I was about a third of the way through and decided to work on them in rotation.

Basically, I'll work on one until I get stuck somehow and move on to the next whilst I figure it out. Much the same way that we do with the model making.

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3 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

As I've had to get up at stupid o'clock,

 

What do you mean! This is not stupid, I love starting the day early. Up with the larks me. :D

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I only sleep about four hours, the next two hours are spent waking up! 

Although I have been known to get home at 4am and decide to just start the day early. 

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Since retiring about 3 years ago, I've gotten into a very different lifestyle.

 

Working in an art studio is no 9 to 5 job. I did many hours overtime, coming home late, going in early etc. Often working 24/7, through the night on new business pitches. 40 years of that kind of lifestyle is enough for anyone.

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What advice would I give to my younger self? Drawing, just practice drawing. It's the key to all figurative art. Without good draughtsmanship, it's like trying to build a house without a proper structure. It may look like a house, but you wouldn't want to live in it.

 

I won a regional art competition when I was 11. It was at that point, I realised I could possibly follow an art career. On leaving school it was a toss up for art school or graphics at college. It was a very difficult decision to make at the time. Which was helped by someone asking me. Do you want to eat sometimes or everyday? I went down the graphic path, and have always kept the fine art simmering on a back burner.

 

 

Edited by Gedward
Editing copy and typos
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I know what you mean, sometimes my insomnia is useful. There aren't many jobs I've had that were nine to five, even those which were supposed to be. I decided a couple of years ago that there's no way that I was going to continue leaving the house at 6am and using my skills and experience to make someone else a millionaire.

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Thanks for sharing your art Rob…the latter pieces remind me a lot of graphic novel artwork which I’m a particular fan of. Good work!
it’s interesting reading folks life choices here as I’m guessing a lot of us here are at a point where we can reflect fairly objectively now. I personally chose to go self employed 20 years ago into a career in music against the advice of everyone around me. I still have to occasionally work hard but I’m still here doing it and loving it! Any creative path is a tricky one but it can be done. 
 

Looking forward to seeing some static grass on the layout ;-)

 

Jay

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7 hours ago, MrWolf said:

I know what you mean, sometimes my insomnia is useful. There aren't many jobs I've had that were nine to five, even those which were supposed to be. I decided a couple of years ago that there's no way that I was going to continue leaving the house at 6am and using my skills and experience to make someone else a millionaire.


I leave the house about 7:15 to get to work for 8:00 although the official start time 8:30, I generally wake up about 11:00 :lol:

 

weekends I like to be up first thing….in the afternoon 

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When I was asked how many people worked in our office, I said about half of them. To be fair though it was nearer two thirds.

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Been working from home since March 2020 and have gone through various phases of music genres - now into Boogie Woogie... 

 

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We have a very eclectic taste of music in this house, it's easier to say what we don't like!

 

I've worked with plenty of people who think that the fact that they turned up is enough. 

 

Those types are always very good at deflection and being suck ups.

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12 hours ago, MrWolf said:

I've worked with plenty of people who think that the fact that they turned up is enough.

 

After redundancy in 2016 and before full retirement, I did some freelancing and I also worked as a film extra for a couple of years.

 

The majority of extras are hard working people but unfortunately, I saw a number of people who fit that description. The irony is that about 80% of your time on a film set, is actually sitting around doing nothing. So this small group were determined to hide for the remaining 20%. Go figure.

 

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1 hour ago, Gedward said:

 

After redundancy in 2016 and before full retirement, I did some freelancing and I also worked as a film extra for a couple of years.

 

The majority of extras are hard working people but unfortunately, I saw a number of people who fit that description. The irony is that about 80% of your time on a film set, is actually sitting around doing nothing. So this small group were determined to hide for the remaining 20%. Go figure.

 

They were probably only there for the food.

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