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New range of simple to assemble 00/EM gauge pointwork kits


NFWEM57
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4 hours ago, Wayne Kinney said:

Hi Guys,

 

Little update :) I'm currently working on making updated instructions for the new 'All Rail' turnout kits. They will be online instructions broken down into easily digestible steps, each with an accompanying YouTube video.

 

It's important that I get this done before changing the kits to the new format, but it is a lot of work filming and editing, so it's going to take some time.

 

I've made the main 'contents' page for the standard turnout instructions, each 'step' will take you to its own page with written instructions, diagrams and YouTube video.

 

https://www.britishfinescale.com/Articles.asp?ID=264

 

contents.jpg.823a0546f5c5b16a46b1dbde4f370800.jpg

 

Each category box will have a picture (like the first one) once I film each step.

 

I'm hoping that these new instructions with the help of videos will make the process of assembling much clearer to understand.

 

It's been a few years since I've had to be in front of the camera and I find it very difficult indeed, but I'm getting  there :)

 

I'll update you as progress is made!

I know from long experience just how hard teaching, presenting to an audience or being in front of a camera is, particularly a press camera or microphone.. Well done, good effort. There are no short cuts, it is sheer practice and effort.  Hats off to you.

Edited by NFWEM57
typo
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One thing I suggested to Martin on the Templot club pages was a printed K crossing jig that could hold all the rails in position while they're soldered. I saw a milled  steel jig at AllyPally many years ago, but getting them mass produced accurately may be prohibitive.

 

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On 12/10/2021 at 12:04, Wayne Kinney said:

Hi Guys,

 

Sorry for not replying, I've taken the weekend to allow me to absorb all the feedback. Also took my wife and little boy to London on Sunday for some sightseeing and to watch the 'Back to the Future Musical' at the Adelphi Theatre (highly recommend!).

 

Regarding my decision to stop using castings and going with an all rail design. I have tested all the suppliers that cast in Nickel Silver, including:

 

Beechcast

Platorum

Just Like The real Thing

Merrell

Sans Pareil

Slaters Plasticard

 

For the majority of the years, I was using 'Just Like The real Thing' for my castings, they were great quality. But then they closed shop in Feb 2018 so I had to find another supplier.

 

After testing many suppliers I went with Sans Pareil (Iain young) as his castings are amazing quality. But as I've said before he is close to retirement and the K crossings were not working anyway.

 

This left just one supplier from the list above that I had not yet tried. I won't mention which one, but I just received sample casting from them. I sent them 5 of my waxes to cast in N/S so I could test their casting quality.

 

Oh guys, receiving these cast samples only cements my decision to move to ‘all rail’. The quality is terrible, putting it mildly. Completely unusable! I’ve now tested all the available suppliers, and only Sans Pareil is up to the quality needed (at least for the common crossings). When he retires, I would have no other supplier up to the job. ‘All rail’ is the way forward.

 

I’ve also come to a firm decision on the tie bar design/solution. I’ve had much feedback and the consensus seems to be that people don’t like the ‘Normal Solomon’ method that I proposed. They all like the method I was using with the etched plates and pin.

 

So I am going to do what I’ve been doing with the N Gauge range for years. My N Gauge kits currently are supplied with the tie bar, etched plates and wire for the pins as separate items. I then also offer soldering jigs (sold separately) that the builder then uses to solider the etched plates and pins to the switch blade themselves. You only need one jig for multiple turnouts. The switch blades would still be supplied pre machined.

 

This would then produce the same result, only the builder solider it using the jig (sold separately).

 

I hope you can agree that this is the best compromise/solution.

Hi Wayne

 

I'm keenly anticipating the 3mm kits, so have been following developments with interest. As a means of quickly and accurately laying turnouts to 14.2mm gauge I think the kits are a game changer. I'm a bit worried about the latest changes though.

 

I reckon swapping the common crossing casting for an all rail solution is fair enough; can't see any real disadvantages to it. However, the previous solution of supplying switch blades ready for laying and attaching to the tie bar was highly attractive and removed one of the barriers people hit when thinking of constructing track. I was wondering what the reason behind the change was. Was it simply that supplying the work completed was an extra bit of labour intensive work in the manufacturing process? Could you have another think about this?

 

Cheers

Nigel

Edited by NCB
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28 minutes ago, Wayne Kinney said:

Hi Nigel,

 

Yes exactly, it takes up too much of my time, unfortunately. It's easy to do with the jigs I will stock, I have been supplying my N Gauge kits like this for years with great success.

Suppose increased sales come at a price....reduced time for manufacturers...

 

 

But if you don't mind please can you direct some our way!, ....yours the lost soles at 14.2mm (3mm)

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26 minutes ago, Wayne Kinney said:

Hi Nigel,

 

Yes exactly, it takes up too much of my time, unfortunately. It's easy to do with the jigs I will stock, I have been supplying my N Gauge kits like this for years with great success.

As an N gauge modeller using Wayne's Code 40 turnout kits, with the caveat that I've only made 4 turnouts so far, I can attest that it is easy to do with the jigs.  The first attempt might be ropey, but once you get the hang of it it's fine.

 

Best

 

Scott.

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9 hours ago, Wayne Kinney said:

Hi Nigel,

 

Yes exactly, it takes up too much of my time, unfortunately. It's easy to do with the jigs I will stock, I have been supplying my N Gauge kits like this for years with great success.

Hi Wayne

Thanks for the reply. Thought it worth asking. I'll give it a go when the 14.2mm points come out. My current method is the Pendon one, using a moveable sleeper, and it must be easier than that :)

Cheers

Nigel

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