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The Skarffe Lt Rly, Government Agency factories


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Hello all,

 

In August I had a rethink about doing the same old same old and decided to go as small as I could without sacrificing a reverse siding. Over the past few weeks Eileen and I have been formulating a back story to guide the whole build. 

 

The back story:-

1070 ..... Geoffroi Skarffe was granted lands in the Welsh Marches for his part in the 1066 invasion. Geoffroi was very grateful and asked the King if he could solve a personal problem. He was a widower his sons had been killed in the battle leaving only his eldest daughter. The next day with much pomp, splendour and Trumpets a Royal Decree arrived at Geoffroi's lodgings.

 

1916 ..... Matilda Skarffe ran the estate in no nonsense military fashion with the practice and ease born of generations of her families attachment to the military. Major Hamilton (Blank) badly wounded in the Ypres battle had taken a commission in the Royal Engineers. Matilda finding that the War Office were asking for rural territory in order to set up Gov't Agency Factories relinquished some of her estate.

 

Hamilton was billeted at Skarffe Grange and it was love at first site. Matilda explained that there was a Royal Decree, which stated that should a female be the estate beneficiary and wish to marry, the suitor must change their name by applying to the Monarch. They were married in Skarffe village Church.

 

The existing light railway partly financed by Matilda passed within site of the estate walls. A little further inwards lay some disused buildings ideal for the start of two factories. One making leather goods and the other webbing, both in great demand.

 

(synopsis rejected by Mills & Boon .Ed)


I often look at Colin French's layout Foxbile

Foxbile.jpg.d78689ead86669ab0d7165a398c6dea7.jpg


With that in mind I wondered if I could make something very small,  not in Colins 29" but not much bigger. I came up with this.

3ft-TrackPlan-750.jpg.21024072486db8a2ab5f9ab2510fc765.jpg

My criteria would have to include a reverse siding and being able to get at both ends of wagons and shunting one wagon at a time and getting quite complex with 6 to 8 wagons on the layout.

 

Cheers - Jim
 

Edited by JimRead
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Hello Kevin,

 

Your right it is but with proviso's, it's mostly track and not so much scenery, so the raison d'être has got to be operating, which I like. I made my first successful controller in 1980, a 3 transistor pulsed/feedback one designed by Brian Tilbury for the 2mm Association and beefed up for OO and O.

 

To me it was a revelation I'd never experienced such control and for just a few pounds. Now I use a simpler circuit which is just that little bit better. And 40 years later I'm still like a kid with a new toy :-)

 

Cheers and thanks very much for the comment.

 

Jim

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Hi Jim, what a coincidence that we should both start our back stories just after the chiropodist William corn curer arrived. You could not make it up, oops! we both have. I'm using a 5.4. 3 ingle nook  which makes a change from Reely Grate and Primrose Hill.

Keep on bodgin, it will be bostin.  

cheers me old mucker.

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Hello MoK 

 

Thanks for commenting good of you I'm quite looking forward to it as well after failing rather dismally a couple of times earlier this year.

 

Hello Mike,

 

Thanks for posting nice of you I'd not heard of 5:4:3 with regard to model railways rather the Pythagorus right angle that builders use.

 

We often visit and once stayed at Hergest Croft, belonging to the Banks family,  they still own 20+ farms Downton Abbey fashion. The Agency factories were forerunners of the shadow factories set up in the mid thirties. I must say that a man often reviled as an appeaser waving his bit of paper at the Airport, Mr Chamberlain, got us another year in which to build stuff and he never said anything. 

 

Cheers both - Jim

 

PS Just up from the bus garage in Brierley Hill there was a caff called 'Bostin Bites' they would have the pork joint for the sarnies in the window, very difficult to drive past.

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Hello Jim.  You have created an interesting O scale micro concept.  What are you thinking for the front of the right hand 12" backscene?  Could you fit something like a partial relief front of a long engine shed?  If you could somehow squeeze the built-in controller a little to the left, there may be space for a second stub storage track.  The area in front of your Barry slip might just fit a little loading dock with a crane for interest.

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Hello John,

 

Many thanks for your comments and your interest good of you.

 

Thanks for the ideas the crane is a good one I might even be able to make one. Other than what the factories are going to be making I'd not given much thought to the scenery. The buildings will be low relief ones using a combination of photographs I have taken and some from Marcel Wifwinkels site https://www.textures.com/ 

 

I have a pic of the top of the board having transferred the drawing I'll post that a bit later.

 

Cheers - Jim

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Hello all,

 

The baseboard drawn on to see if the plan will work.

BaseboardText.jpg.1d5a3a10cadd4d02a8924f6bbfd48ed9.jpg


It didn't! I've  had to make it 3" longer and alter the traverser angle from 10 degrees to 5 degrees.

1/. Cut out for the traverser
2/. These pencil lines are taken from a rail rather than the centre line, the one on the left had to avoid the traverser and one the right to see if there's enough room for the backscene.
3/. The 'Barry' slip two ordinary points on top of each other.
4/. The dotted lines are for the cross member and its diagonal, drawn to see if the diagonal will miss the point tie bar.
5/. 1" at the end and the same at the other side leaving enough room for a tongue and groove either side of the traverser.

 

I've bought some cheap screw clamps on eBay I'll be able to put the sides now.

 

Cheers - Jim

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Jim, I rotated your photo and saved to be able to compare to your original sketch.  So as to not confuse myself, can you identify where the extra 3" is?  I will try to draw full size for myself.  Ikea has very reasonable paper rolls for children(and me), 18 1/2" x 98', $4.99 here in US, 4GBP UK.

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Hello John,

 

Thanks for the comment and for the question, I have a dolls house ruler in 12th's easy to scale, this is the tightest plan I've ever come up with. The 'back of the fiddle yard' is always a problem and difficult to solve.

 

I added 1" at the traverser end and 2" at the other in order to move the Barry slip back a bit. This to enable the reverse siding to pass the traverser cut out and backscene and leave room for the loco and one wagon down from the slip.

 

I'm making some wagons and vans with no more than 9Ft wheel bases preferably ones scrapped by the mainline companies in the late 19th C. Andy sent me a couple drawings including this one from the Hundred of Manhood and Selsey Tramway.

163474445_166HMSTvanex-SERbox.jpg.8b2572a5f3093b43293bd22039a4a654.jpg


Cheers - Jim

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Jim, here is a mock-up of your proposed micro layout.  It is 39 3/8" x 15 7/8"(1m x 1/3 of 4x8 ply).  I used your 5 degree angle.  The Barry slip is #3 frog(19 deg angle).   There may be a problem with backdrop treatment right behind the slip.  I may consider moving everything forward by 1/2" to give slightly more traverser room.  The front right siding would need a slight curve.1580408351_20201209_161029(1).jpg.0b632c69a9160c70b10cdb3266047a52.jpg

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Hello John,

 

Thanks for doing that good of you, it goes together very well indeed. I don't know what a #3 frog is not heard of the term before.

 

I like the way you've made the Barry slip very well done, great space savers aren't they. I first came across them in the Selsey Tramway book, didn't even know what they were called but always wanted to use them, now this will be the third layout I've used one.

 

You could start another thread with your build it would be an asset to the BML&D :-)

 

Cheers - Jim

 

[edit] your right about the the width I allowed 10 mm between the wagons on the traverser I drew a straight line off it I've altered that to a curve.

 

The back story

Well the curved wall was part of Matilda's Crinkle Crankle wall behind which an ancestor grew roses and sent new variants to Empress Josephine during the Anglo French wars.

 

(go away, .Ed)

Edited by JimRead
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Hello Kevin,

 

Thanks for the question the answer is yes there is a member on  here Hayfield he calls himself, I'm sure he would make one for you.

 

If you fancied having a go yourself, please send me a PM with your email address and I'll gladly send you my point making PDF. It assumes that the reader has never filed or soldered anything.

 

Cheers - Jim

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Here is an article that I wrote in the Gauge O Guild  Gazette about making a point.

A #3 frog means that the diverging rails of the frog spread out 1 ft. for every 3 ft. of run.  This makes about 19 degrees.  If you look at many brands of HO track, you will see frog numbers specified.  If you do a Google search for:  railroad turnout frogs chart, you will find all that you ever wanted to know.  #3 is more in the line of street railway trackage.

Barry slip.jpg

Barry slip 2.jpg

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Hello John,

 

Fair play to you for writing an article about point making, I find it very difficult trying to put down the steps that I do without thinking about it and of course doing it for people who've never done anything like it before. I'm currently re-writing my controller one, which assumes a complete lack of electronic knowledge, you would be very welcome to it. I'm not a guild member I see no point in me joining as I make as much as I can myself.

 

I do see what you mean and get your idea for the loco shed side, it's a good one.

 

Hello Daniel,

 

Many thanks for your kind comment what you say about chatting is quite right and one of the joys of the micro layout. Two chairs in front so that I can talk to interested visitors and still be able to operate at the same time. Everyone who sits down is interesting to talk to.

 

I recall a lady asking if she could sit, being a bit tired, she turned out to be a station masters daughter the station being an isolated Lincolnshire one with no running water (tank in the siding) no gas and a lights only electricity supply. Fortunately one of the club members who'd helped organise the event was a historian as well, he came over and was going to visit her to record her memories. Great stuff :-)

 

Cheers - Jim

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Hi Jim,

Good to see another interesting layout thread from you.  I'm still going with my all wooden loco and rolling stock but things have slowed down somewhat as I have been working on OO stuff with 3D printing.  I shall follow this build with great interest.

Ian

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Hello Ian

 

Many thanks for your nice comments, I do recall the wooden loco and the pic you sent me of it. It would make a great micro layout loco and if you were to start a thread in this micro section it would prove very interesting to all those interested, including me.

 

Cheers - Jim

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello all,

 

I finished my baseboard;

Baseboard5Pics.jpg.ec01f915e21c097fc76f4b6ca99e4cc5.jpg

 

1/. Gluing the blocks to support the sides.
2/. Ditto the ends and the same technique for the sides.
3/. Two cross members and diagonal braces
4/. Traverser recess cut out slides in place and two more diagonal braces, I cannot twist this anymore than a couple of millimetres.
5/. The traverser with its slide on top and the removable 'grooves' to go under the board. The tongues have been glued at the edges of the traverser recess.

 

Here's a video;

 

 

Showing how it operates.

 

Cheers - Jim

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  • JimRead changed the title to The Skarffe Lt Rly, Government Agency factories - traverser video

Hello all,

 

Having done the above I can start the trackwork;

sleepers01.jpg.0fdc96a1e7ab337118d515b6c3b1a3fa.jpg


I bought some 1.5mm grey card and I've started cutting it to make the plain track sleepers, I'll also use it to make the crossing timbers for the Barry slip as well. The Shellacked bit with the lines is my sleeper spacer and rail marker which I can use to mark out where the sleepers will go from either the centre line or from one of the rail lines that I've drawn onto the baseboard.

 

Cheers - Jim

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Hello Jim, I’m a huge fan of your blog and the layouts you have built so far. The traverser video will be very useful to me. Here’s looking forward to the day when I can finally meet you at an exhibition and have a blether. In the meantime I shall continue to watch this thread with interest. All the best, Andrew

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  • JimRead changed the title to The Skarffe Lt Rly, Government Agency factories

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