Jump to content

The Skarffe Lt Rly, Government Agency factories


Recommended Posts

Hello Andrew,

 

Many thanks for your nice comment I'm really pleased that I've been some help with the traverser video, it makes the doing of it worthwhile. Should we meet at an exhibition you would be very welcome to have a go.

 

I've just been along the C83 on Google and noticed the tree plantations and the trenches to plant more once drained. I hitch hiked around Scotland years ago and had a lift from a forester on the west coast. He pointed out an area of land that had been fenced and left, we stopped by it and he named the trees that had seeded themselves must have been a dozen or so. I'm still flummoxed thinking about how they got there.

 

North Uist looks a likely place for a light railway :-)

 

Cheers - Jim

 

A Y8 on the Spurn Head rly
https://www.skeals.co.uk/Articles/Spurn Railway.html

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Scarily astute of you Jim - I live overlooking that very forest! Mind you, I’m quite sure that the ‘trenches’ to which you refer are where locals cut the peats for heating their homes, a practice that continues to this day. Not sure about trying to lay a railway, not matter how ‘light’, on the peat bog :D Here’s looking forward to us all being let out to play once again and get-togethers at shows. All the best, Andrew

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Andrew,

 

Thanks for the reply good of you.
I once travelled between Dublin and Galway by train.
I ended up in the bar with a Bishop from Africa, "Have you had the Guinness" he said.
At one point in the journey the carriage rocked gently from side to side.
"It's not the Guinness said the B, it's the peat!"

 

Apparently when they built the line the peat bog was bottomless. They used sheep skins under the ballast.

I cycled away from Galway station blotto, found a cabin that did B&B, and went to bed very early.

 

Cheers - Jim

  • Funny 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Keep me posted which exhibitions you’ll be at once we’re all off the lead. It’ll be worth the trip to sit in your spare chair and hear all your stories. 
Cheers!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my current version of Jim's layout that I have been trying to build.  It is 1/4" underlayment plywood with a simple 1x2 frame.  16" x 1 meter.  I added a piece of track to make another short siding off the traverser.

 

20210111_153633.jpg

  • Like 5
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello John,

 

Thanks for the picture you've done it very well indeed fair play to you. 

 

O gauge micro layouts are a bit thin on the ground, I am often the only micro in any scale at the shows I take mine to. It would be really good if you were to start a thread on here yourself. I'm sure all on here including myself would be very interested to see how the two layouts progressed after starting from the same point.

 

May I ask you put some diagonals under your board 2x1 has a nasty habit of twisting and warping, as I found out to my dismay when I used it on one layout.

 

Cheers - Jim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jim.  I have had success with 1x lumber here in the US and no twisting.  Now first, I am picking good lumber and letting it age for months before use.  I have a 1' x 8' model of a famous railroad by Chuck Yungkurth, called the Gum Stump and Snowshoe.  It is 1x2 framing and maybe 25 years old with no warping.  I also made a 5' x 5' HO/OO display layout, using thin(5/32) junky ply framed with 1x3 and only 2 cross pieces.  The ply itself has bowed up a little on one edge requiring extra screws, but otherwise it stayed straight.  I have on it 42" legs from 1x4.  I just tested it by sitting on one corner.  Also, with the current 1 meter layout, the framing is fastened with exterior torx head wood screws about 1 5/8 long.

Now regarding my trackage, I experimented with all PC board ties.  I shear my own ties from copper-clad sheet.  I have drilled 1.4mm holes in some ties right outside the rail edge.  So now I can screw down each piece of track with tiny screws meant for Marklin track.  The screw heads are unobtrusive.

I built my traverser before your informative video.  One side is held by the aluminum angle.  Opposite this, I sawed a slot in the wood frame cross piece.  Under the traverser I have a tab of 1/8" aluminum that slides in this slot, held with a screwed post and a a coil spring.  Maybe I should have used your method, which is simpler.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello John,

 

Many thanks for your reply good of you to take the time to explain about your timber. 

 

The very first layout I made used similar construction methods to yours, it warped within a year. Since then I have used the geodetic method and I merely endeavour to pass on my experience to others.

 

Some people have baulked at the 'complexity' of my construction, I show them this on my blog from the EM Gauge 70's group. Keith Trueman's 5ft x 2ft baseboard;

trueman_project01_600.jpg.ad318bff8c2dcb1aa82ee0bdb0579c9b.jpg


I sincerely hope your board does not warp and that you have many years of operating fun with it :-) Please do correct me if I am wrong John but was it you I sent a photo to showing the wooden traverser construction method I use from one of my other layouts?

 

Cheers - Jim

  • Like 1
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • JimRead changed the title to The Skarffe Lt Rly, Government Agency factories

Hello all,

My rail arrived yesterday from Marcway,

Rail01.jpg.8d01e684374a131a04a2ebd7002599ed.jpg


I'd cut and glued more sleepers on while waiting for it.
It's Code 100 flat bottom, I did try the Code 75 but the wheels bounced on the track spikes, the C100 gets fairly close to the flimsiness of light railway track though.
I use the cheap super glue from the local shop, I've found it to be the easiest to use and the tube will deliver the tiniest amount.
The pic shows getting a good alignment from the traverser to the board using a rule and some blue tack.

 

Cheers - Jim

  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my current progress.  I have added backdrop sections made from 3/16" Gatorfoam supported by right angle curtain brackets.  Please excuse the inverted image which is what seems to come from the phone.

20210118_155552_001.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello John,

 

Thanks for the update, it's very interesting to see how you are proceeding with your build.
I see you've managed to get the building 'walls' between the tracks, fair play to you.

 

Cheers - Jim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello John,

Many thanks for the update you are doing very well indeed.

 

Hello all,

 

Lining up the track off the traverser
Rail01.jpg.74f43a8ab98af6fd1a7100677b5e782f.jpg

 

Bits of blue tack, an old steel rule and super glue from the corner shop the best I've ever used it'll deliver the tiniest amount of glue.
The rail is Code 100 flat bottom to get near to the lightweight stuff used on Light Railways, I did try some Code 75 which would have been better but the wheels bounced on the track spikes.

 

Starting the Barry slip
Rail02.jpg.9767007af99fc6a4c70620ff602ee096.jpg

 

Began with the top curved stock rail just glued in a few places
Then the crossing vee on the right
From the left; the other crossing vee, the wing rail and the straight point blade


All lined up with the rule and all just glued in a few places, a soldering iron will undo mistakes.
Because I'm using card I will have to join each of the bits with wire.

 

Having got to this stage I can make the lower half knowing that it'll line up OK, well that's the idea anyway, does it always work, errrrr well often it doesn't that's why I don't glue it all up straightaway. I did the same with the copperclad strips and solder as well, when I could afford them!

 

The odd dark bits on the rule are where I've taken out the reflections with the Curves tool.

 

Cheers - Jim

  • Like 2
  • Craftsmanship/clever 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Hello John,

 

Thanks for posting your nice building.

 

Hello all,

 

I looked around for some stuff to operate the points
1711712474_WireScrews.jpg.8bbbb83d653e9beee443b78eb491f5ea.jpg

 

Found some wire but no tube and then had a thought, do I really need the tube, I'd got some small brass screws and thought I'd give it a try on some scrap plywood, it works.

 

Then I fixed it under the board
Rail05_WireLoop.jpg.d3e520bf2efc006efa788b0bfd5bf333.jpg

 

And used some fencing wire for something to grip, work a treat as well, cost zero.

 

While looking around I came across Keith Trueman's page: http://www.emgauge70s.co.uk/model_omwb60.html and his idea for point control, scroll right down the page to see it.
Rail04.jpg.38ee82f4fb0176394f99157f32fbfb20.jpg

 

Seeing what Keith had done I thought I would have a go myself, he'd used some plastic micro just under the top of the rail as a tie bar. I would not be able to do that because my old Hornby wheels would bounce over it.

 

Well, the Selsey tramway to the rescue again, they must have had the same problem with their flimsy flat bottom rail, what they did was to drill a hole in the bottom of the rail and attach  the tie bar under it.

 

What I liked most about Keith's idea was attaching the rail to the crossing strip rather than a thin piece of copper clad tie bar which will come undone usually at a show.

 

Cheers - Jim

  • Like 2
  • Craftsmanship/clever 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Attached shows how I am attempting point control.  Here in the US, old used Japanese switch machines can be found very cheaply.  So I removed the coils from 2, and am using them manually.  A brass wire with a little knob protrudes through the front of baseboard.  The machines provide positive sprung side control and electrical contacts.  I solder a 1/2" long 0-80 screw to the copper throwbar above.  I thread on a nut and solder .032 spring wire to it to connect the mechanism.

20210220_151335.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Further to my own version, I thought to add a tiny loco shed at one end.  This is the result, 1/16" plywood, with rusted steel corrugated.  7 inches long.

As always, excuse the inverted phone photo.  Maybe someone can tell me how to correct this.

20210304_145105_001.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

20210304_145105_001.jpg.e9126126664791d419f6e4903faa7211.jpg.9e40e7b64cad744c4c14b303a5280be4.jpg

 

 

20210308_160023_001.jpg.9e793abf741822785bb7f37672fd63b5.jpg.42d386942905e80b466c1f272c31654c.jpg

 

John, I took the liberty of downloading your last two pics, and inverting them.  Almost any photo or gallery app will have a function to do this, either on Android or iPhones, or on a PC, Mac, or Linux. It's usually in the edit image thingy at the bottom of the picture, have a look, and if you can't find it, I 'll do the rest for you!  Nice model BTW!

 

Cheers, Mike

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...