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Opaque glass from Humbrol thinner on Hornby Coach?


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Hi, started to weather the Hornby Thompson Coach (see picture) using a wash of humbrol matt black and humbrol thinners. I noted clouding of the windows which on attempting to clean fully became irreversibly opaque. The thinners appear to react with the plastic as well.

 

Seemingly this is not an issue in Hornby Yearbook No. 7 2015, page 59 with same coach but MIG enamel weathering wash.

 

Is this issue so well known that it is not mentioned? Humbrol are Hornby – right?

 

What is the prospect for repairing this?

IMG_E1743.JPG

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7 minutes ago, cheekychops said:

Hi, started to weather the Hornby Thompson Coach (see picture) using a wash of humbrol matt black and humbrol thinners. I noted clouding of the windows which on attempting to clean fully became irreversibly opaque. The thinners appear to react with the plastic as well.

 

Seemingly this is not an issue in Hornby Yearbook No. 7 2015, page 59 with same coach but MIG enamel weathering wash.

 

Is this issue so well known that it is not mentioned? Humbrol are Hornby – right?

 

What is the prospect for repairing this?

IMG_E1743.JPG

 

Most / all thinners will cloud clear plastic glazing.

 

I would obtain some Johnson's Klear - or Humbrol Clear - and apply it to the windows; it should restore the glossiness.

 

John Isherwood.

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  • RMweb Gold

Humbrol thinners will certainly react adversely with clear glazing. They are very aggresive. You'll also get a headache if you breathe the fumes for too long!

 

I suggest that you thin your enamel paint with white spirit and only use small quantities at a time. The MIG enamel wash that you mention is already thinned sufficently for direct application to a coach side.

 

You may find this will help to explain it:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blogs/entry/21241-set-732-introduction/

 

Edited by Mick Bonwick
Link to blog article added.
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  • 3 weeks later...

If the earlier replies have helped then ignore this message!!!  Is the damage to the glazing merely on the surface or is it deeper than that??  Many years ago (at least 6 decades!) I used wet and dry to key the varnish on a wooden dinghy prior to revarnishing.  I nearly had a trouser accident, but dad explained that the new varnish would return the shiny surface - and it did.   Some years ago I used matt varnish on a too shiny coach.  To my dismay the widows all went semi opaque.  A thin layer of gloss varnish on the windows returned the windows to their previous condition.   

 

   Any help??

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