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Hello SZ.

I'm sure Gareth will answer your query but I notice that the traverser tracks are curved at the ends.  That is to ensure that they align when pivoted so you should have nothing to worry about..

 

 

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1 hour ago, Barnaby said:

I'm sure Gareth will answer your query but I notice that the traverser tracks are curved at the ends.  That is to ensure that they align when pivoted so you should have nothing to worry about...

 

 

I think that works only with near parallel entry tracks.

 

The closer the entry tracks converge the closer the pivot point needs to be to the entry point, eventually crowding out the possibility of having multi-tracks on the sector plate. Which is why some traverse movement on the plate is needed.

 

Edited by SZ
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  • RMweb Gold

Hi SZ....all the tracks do line up (very closely) from a single pivot point. Some aspects are slightly better than others (see pics below), but the angle is close enough that even the little Peckett runs over at a crawl, with a wheelbase of only about 22mm. There isn't any noticeable "kink" as trains run across...I say trains, but I only have one wagon so far! It's saved me about 6" on the length of the layout....important on one this tiny. It all works reliably with the microswitches isolating and energising the tracks as they line up. I don't think it's a new idea.

 

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Bit more wiring done today while I should have been working.

In the general spirit of using up any old bits I can find, the point actuators are made of a bit of rail running through the brass bits cut out of terminal strips and soldered to brass strip, simply driven by a servo. The end of the rail works a microswitch to change the polarity of the frog. Bit Heath Robinson, but it works.

 

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It must be said that Bantam Street Yard is a wonderful layout Gareth.

The more I look at it the more I'm tempted to re-invest in 00 but then I've looked at a direct track comparison in 0 gauge which would only require some 6 1/2ft to build BSY on.

 

Sets me thinking on what if I was to stretch that 6 1/2ft up to 8 ft for 0 gauge.

 

Mmmmmnn i think I'll get out of your thread and go and have a ponder over on mine limiting my layout space to 8ft [2 x 4ft boards].   

   Now where are my stash of small 0 gauge track plan books.

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Thanks for the very kind words...long way to go yet though!

 

Wiring pretty much complete now. I might put a couple of isolated sections in later, but I'm pretty much working on the one engine in steam principle. The sector plate self isolates when not lined up. The little point actuator mechanisms work quite well.

 

m6.jpg

m4.jpg

Edited by Gareth001
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Started to make some simple mockups of buildings to get an idea of how things will fit. This is going to be a sort of granary / mill thingy which straddles the sector plate, hiding most of it from view. The terraced house is a scaled down version of my 7mm kit, but I'm still doing the artwork for the windows, so it's just a shell at the moment. I'm going to incorporate at least one pair of these along the backscene.

 

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Edited by Gareth001
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Here's a better view of the sector plate entrance. With another structure to the right of the entrance track it should be disguised pretty well.

 

m7.jpg

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Yes some may say it is a "mock up" but it puts my builds to shame.  :paint:

E.G. Gareth's mock ups are just that much better than my so called finished builds.

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Edited by Barnaby
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I fancy the idea of the front of the baseboard being part of the scenery, so I'm going to make an old harbour wall, with the idea that it could be a silted up canal basin or disused estuary port, or the tide could be out. This is part of the master, made from 10 thou styrene stones on a 20 thou backing. When it's finished I'll make a mould and cast enough for the whole of the front of the layout. Sorry about the poor photo, and I couldn't rotate it for some reason.

 

 

s1.jpg

Edited by Gareth001
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Finished the pattern for the dockside wall, and remembered again why I moved to the more  optically friendly 7mm scale. Drilling the holes to represent where the chair bolts had been in re-used sleepers was particularly migraine inducing. We'll see how the mould comes out in the morning....I'm a little apprehensive about the overhang in the pattern to allow the panels to link together, but I think the mould will be flexible enough to deal with it.

 

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First castings out of the mould. Couple of schoolboy errors though...I didn't really use enough latex (cos I'm a skinflint) so the mould is a bit thin on the overlap areas, so may not last too long. I still have the pattern though, so I can make another mould. I've also realised that I should have made the panels a bit bigger than the depth of the baseboard edge, so that they at least match the rail height. I'll have to mount them a little higher...ho hum. I think the castings look ok though. They fit together nicely, and could also be used for some applications in 7mm too.

d6.jpg

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That looks very good Gareth.

Re the overlap issue couldn't you just make the start and end of a wall panel be where the verticals are and add one per join separately once the panels are butted up together.

 

I'm not too sure what you have found out of true with the mould overlap so I'm guessing a bit with my suggestion.

 

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Hi Barnaby. the panels don't just butt up together: the timber stanchion at the right hand end of the panel is cast half on and half off the stone section behind, so that when the panels are put together it overlaps the adjacent one. I don't think I've described it very well...I'll post a pic tomorrow. What this means is that the edge of the mould is wider at the bottom than at the top ( the same apples to the part where the stanchions rise above the wall). This in turn means the casting has to be coaxed out of the mould, which is not usually a problem as long as the undercut is not too deep, or the mould above the undercut is not too thin because someone is too mean to use any more latex. Lesson learned!

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The pics below show what I was trying to describe. You can see what I mean about the weakness of the mould at the top. The closeup is a bit cruel, and shows flash on the mould I hadn't even noticed. Having seen that, I'm surprised (but pleased) that the castings come out as well as they do!

d8.jpg

d7.jpg

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And some pics of the row of castings in place (sort of). When I stick them on I'll raise them a bit so the railhead isn't higher than the dockside.

 

q2.jpg

q1.jpg

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   Exactly the same system as I used on my Quayside layout in 0-16.5. I cast 3 bay sections, you can see where the joins are by the gap in the top timbers which would have been visible any way in real life, I figured 30 feet would be just about a handleable length for timber baulks and a sensible length to get out of a tree trunk. 

 The dressed capping stones are actually separate from the quay wall and are  lengths of unequal leg "L" shaped plastic overlapping the edge of the casting, with the stones scribed in, no two are exactly the same length or width as the ones next to it.  These are copied from the ones on Port Dinorwic quayside in North Wales, inspired by an article on it's build in in an issue of Narrow Gauge and Industrial Railway Modelling Review some years back, and several subsequent visits to it during my days off from volunteering on the Festiniog Railway.  The bollards are copied from there too. I still have the moulds and patterns in 7mm scale for the walls and bollards so castings are available to order for any one by request to Port Wynnstay Models. 

100_1066

100_1071

 

Edited by Phil Traxson
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I've scaled down a version of my own 7mm kit for a terraced house, and although the muntins (or glazing bars) have lost a tiny bit of definition when compared to the O gauge version, I'm quite pleased with the result. The kit is designed to give the builder a choice of finishes and detailing: what is shown here is the unpainted version of the basic kit. I'm going to put a representation of a rendered finish on this pair.

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I've made a start on the mill building, cutting out the front elevation and lightly scribing on guidelines for the weatherboarding. I had some problems with the windows to begin with until I discovered a line overcut feature on the cutter, and increased the thickness of the glazing bars by 0.02mm. Mk1, 2 and 3 below. I think this is about the limit for this machine, but I don't think such fine details could be achieved with casting or a laser cut (I could be wrong!). Even a brass etching would be a challenge, and expensive too.

 

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Edited by Gareth001
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