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I use double sided tape, the wide variety. I stick it to the surface with the apertures cut for doors and windows and then cut the tape through the aperture and then stick it to the other material and repeat.

 

 

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Superglue seems to work rather well for gluing plasticard to cardboard and foamcore board, but i'm not sure about pure foamboard. However don't waste your money on the expensive superglues though. The cheaper industrial grade superglues you can get on Amazon or eBay are great, and come in larger quantity bottles. I have used PVA in the past as well, but some can take an age to go off, in which time the plasticard has moved.... Gorilla Glue PVA goes off after about 20 minutes, and is solid after 24 hours, so can recommend that.

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I use UHU solvent free and find a thin coat on the plastikard and then apply to the  plastikard to the foamboard gives time for adjustments, then apply weights, I use a thick magazine then metal weights. Leave for about an hour then glue the parts together again using the UHU. I then clamp the corners with ally angle both sides using large plastic sprung clips.

 

hope that this is helpful, Mike 

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I've tried PVA which works OK, tried a carcase of plasticard caused warping but now settled on hot glue and foamboard as my preferred methodology. I've been building a variety of buildings large and small with a carcase made from foam board [4 sheets £10 Hobbycraft ] then glued with  a bead of hot glue along one edge to initially hold and then around the remaining edges . This works with Wills and Peco embossed plastic sheet. 

 

Benefits quick drying but sufficient time to adjust. With internal bracing very strong but light. Its also cheap!!

 

HTH's

 

Doug

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The thing about PVA is that there is a vast range of quality, which isn't obvious to the consumer, due to the variation in how much actual polymer is in it. The dry matter content of such glues can vary from 5 to 50% (5 is possible but would be a bit extreme) with the viscosity being maintained by other chemicals instead. The bonding power of the lower active content glues is much less. As a general rule if you use woodworking quality PVA it should work. Craft glue, so called, is mostly water. You need the high active content because one side of your material is non-porous.

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