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Great piece of modelmaking. I always feel that the lesser buildings on many layouts are neglected detail wise. I can see that's not going to happen here!

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On 23/01/2021 at 15:16, Great Eastern Lady said:

Superb bit of modelling, I just love your back scene , the way you’ve captured the moody sky

Many thanks. I probably spent about six weeks overall on this. As I didn't just want to set Bovey Tor in a particular era. But also paying attention to the season and weather too. So I first spent countless hours searching image banks. Looking for the right kind of stormy sky and the right kind of terrain, as I am modelling the Dartmoor area. I ended up purchasing two images, one for the sky and one for the terrain.

I then knitted them together in Photoshop. And drew a grid over the entire image. Then with the image on my computer, used this as a reference to paint the scene. Grid by grid, hope this makes sense.

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12 hours ago, Kris said:

That's some dedication all those bricks. 

Dedication plus a lot of blood, sweat and some tears. Reminds me of that song, Rip it up and start again.

Been there done that.

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On 21/01/2021 at 17:29, MrWolf said:

Great piece of modelmaking. I always feel that the lesser buildings on many layouts are neglected detail wise. I can see that's not going to happen here!

 

Many thanks Mr Wolf. Starting out, I did a number of tests using various styrene brick sheets which worked OK. But I was struggling to conceal the corners even though I'd mitred them all. And then I watched a couple of Pendon videos and decided to try that method instead.

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38 minutes ago, Gedward said:

 

Many thanks Mr Wolf. Starting out, I did a number of tests using various styrene brick sheets which worked OK. But I was struggling to conceal the corners even though I'd mitred them all. And then I watched a couple of Pendon videos and decided to try that method instead.

 

I remember being about 12 years old and reading the Pendon "how to" series that was published in the Model Railway Constructor between 1981-83. I was hooked. Unfortunately, getting hold of the right sort of card was tricky for me, but I did persevere and used the colour side of things as an extension of the drawings and paintings that I had started to produce. 

I don't know if you can still get blank postcards, but I did (as recommended) and they were fantastic for making anything that was planked or clapboarded. I made some really pleasing derelict barns, one of which helped me score an A in my A level art exam so has stuck in my memory, which is probably why I was so hugely impressed with the barn on Little Muddle. 

As for the assorted plastics, lining up the courses in embossed sheet calls for marking out that is very critical. The moulded sheet which I use is a little more forgiving, you have to forget about any watch makers files though and put the bevel on with an eight inch engineers file. Plus a sharper angle than 45 degrees, brace the internal angle and once set, any indiscrepancy can bet filled and recut.

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2 hours ago, MrWolf said:

 

I remember being about 12 years old and reading the Pendon "how to" series that was published in the Model Railway Constructor between 1981-83. I was hooked. Unfortunately, getting hold of the right sort of card was tricky for me, but I did persevere and used the colour side of things as an extension of the drawings and paintings that I had started to produce. 

I don't know if you can still get blank postcards, but I did (as recommended) and they were fantastic for making anything that was planked or clapboarded. I made some really pleasing derelict barns, one of which helped me score an A in my A level art exam so has stuck in my memory, which is probably why I was so hugely impressed with the barn on Little Muddle. 

As for the assorted plastics, lining up the courses in embossed sheet calls for marking out that is very critical. The moulded sheet which I use is a little more forgiving, you have to forget about any watch makers files though and put the bevel on with an eight inch engineers file. Plus a sharper angle than 45 degrees, brace the internal angle and once set, any indiscrepancy can bet filled and recut.

 

Getting a Flying Scotsman train set for Christmas was the seed. But my first real interest in the hobby was in the early 70s when I started working. Although I never got any further than buying the Railway Modeller back then. That and Meccano magazine. Not having the space or the funds to get started on a layout. But for me, it's always been about the modelling, rather than the railway. Of course I can't wait to see trains running on Bovey Tor. But I'm sure that I will lose interest once the modelling is done. And probably end up selling Bovey Tor, as I did with my 'N' gauge layout in 1995. BTW, that derelict barn on Little Muddle is amazing, as is the rest of the layout. And is exactly the sort of thing I aspire to build here. Lots of greenery, scenery and lots of trees and bushery. Oh and of course being Dartmoor, lashings of dry stone walls and moorland shrubs. But most of all details, details and more details. Cos that's where the devil lies.

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Having been born and raised in Paddington, I guess gives me a pretty good excuse and reason to pursue my trip down the Great Western memory lane with this layout. We lived close to Westbourne Park and Royal Oak stations, the very busy approach to Paddington. And where I cut my teeth trainspotting with my Ian Allan book. Although by then, it was mainly Warships and Westerners doing heavy lifting. I was 8 in 1963, so have some fond memories of the steam era. We spent all of our summer holidays in Devon, travelling down to Brixham in the late 50s. Sun, sea, sand and steam. What’s not to love?

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On 01/02/2021 at 09:15, Gedward said:

Having been born and raised in Paddington, 

And did Paddington Basin figure in your local explorations? It might explain the Tavistock Canal.

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11 minutes ago, Oldddudders said:

And did Paddington Basin figure in your local explorations? It might explain the Tavistock Canal.

 

Absolutely, as kids we used to play around the basin and the many bomb sites. We used the canal at Little Venice to visit the London Zoo. And when designing the layout for Bovey Tor, top of the list was that it must include water.

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About 50 years ago I enjoyed a narrowboat excursion called Jason's Trip from there to Camden Locks and back. A most relaxing experience in Central London. 

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5 hours ago, Oldddudders said:

About 50 years ago I enjoyed a narrowboat excursion called Jason's Trip from there to Camden Locks and back. A most relaxing experience in Central London. 

 

Wow! So that would be 1971, when I left school and started working at 16 years young.

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This is really outstanding work on the buildings and the backscene. As others have said, you have captured the mood of the area very well.

 

May I just enquire, though, whether there are to be any window sills on the lovely signalbox, please?

 

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14 minutes ago, Captain Kernow said:

This is really outstanding work on the buildings and the backscene. As others have said, you have captured the mood of the area very well.

 

May I just enquire, though, whether there are to be any window sills on the lovely signalbox, please?

 

 

Thanks so much. Trying to create a Dartmoor scene in May, just after the rain.

 

I guess all the buildings are about 90% done. I've left off the final details till after installation stage. Window sills, drain pipes, guttering, flashing, signage, cuddly toy etc.

 

Also, I like to take a pause at this stage and see how I feel about it in a few weeks. Always good to take a break and come back with fresh eyes, rather than just rush and finish it in one go I think.

 

George

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1 minute ago, Gedward said:

Always good to take a break and come back with fresh eyes, rather than just rush and finish it in one go I think.

 

I totally agree with you in that respect and I am certain it will pay dividends eventually.

 

G

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