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O Gauge Modular Standard Discussion


  

47 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you be interested in building a module?

    • with a single track standard gauge connection
      26
    • with a double track connection
      7
    • including some sort of narrow gauge
      8
    • nah ...
      6


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Just coming back to this one, is there to be a presence at Stafford?

 

if so, I am taking Fourgig East so it would be nice to connect it up, but it's handbuilt track. I do have a length of Peco BH flexi, so I assume if I make a suitable bridging unit that can dock to my board and then connect to another using fishplates that would be okay?

 

 

At present it seems that thee and me are the only ones building modules ... and yours is the only one making good progress. Andy and I have had a chat and it was decided that it may be better if we try and get things together for next year as this year would be a little ambitious. So, 2012 here we come ...

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good progress, blimey!

 

it only got wired up and half ballasted 'cos I did it as a demo at the Mansfield Show, nowt has happened since .....

 

Must get the ballasting finished so I can do the platforms for Stafford :blink:

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  • 2 weeks later...

At present it seems that thee and me are the only ones building modules ... and yours is the only one making good progress. Andy and I have had a chat and it was decided that it may be better if we try and get things together for next year as this year would be a little ambitious. So, 2012 here we come ...

As I told Jack @ club tonight I have sketched out a basic plan for a simple module for the module group based on Fron Fraith halt on the Kerry branch. Gosh PECO track is going to look so heavy & serious!

 

John.

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  • 1 month later...

With regard to the six inch joining links between modules, are these to be on bases the same thickness as the modules? If so they will not act as compensation for any slight inaccuracies in height between adjoining sections because they will be sitting on the table instead of free to find their own level.

 

If they were on thinner bases, suspended by the fishplates, they could provided allowance for possible inaccuracies but they would then be subjected to quite some strain when a heavy (eg white metal kit) loco is on them.

 

If they were then shortened, say to three inches, they would still act as compensating links but would not bear the full weight of locos due to the wheelbases spanning the gap and being partly supported by the adjacent modules instead of bearing their full weight on the links.

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With regard to the six inch joining links between modules, are these to be on bases the same thickness as the modules? If so they will not act as compensation for any slight inaccuracies in height between adjoining sections because they will be sitting on the table instead of free to find their own level.

 

If they were on thinner bases, suspended by the fishplates, they could provided allowance for possible inaccuracies but they would then be subjected to quite some strain when a heavy (eg white metal kit) loco is on them.

 

If they were then shortened, say to three inches, they would still act as compensating links but would not bear the full weight of locos due to the wheelbases spanning the gap and being partly supported by the adjacent modules instead of bearing their full weight on the links.

 

The connection plates I have been working on are 6" pieces of 6mm brich ply with track [soon to be] fixed to them. I see what your saying though about support for weightier locos and stock ... I may experiment with putting in a bit of support.

 

Thanks.

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should have posted this earlier

 

here's a couple of pics of Fourgig from the Member's Day

 

Looking good there ... and thanks for flying the flag on members ... hopefully next year we'll be able to put a few modules together.

 

I'm hoping to begin track laying this week ...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all

I'm new here, but having read your ideas so far I think you are going to come unstuck with that 6" joining section. Years ago I had a modular layout in 0 gauge tinplate (yes, Hornby) and I joined the sections with small 2-3" sections of track that slotted in vertically onto brass fingers that went up the middle of the tinplate. Worked well, with the loose fit allowing for any slight inaccuracies. Now, so far your moduals are loose in relation to each other? So what if one gets knocked out of line? Shouldn't they be g-clamped together? Then take your loose section and have it (the birch ply with track attached) sit in a recess on each board as they are slid together, apply the clamp or otherwise lock them together - now that they are together. Now, like my joining piece, yours only needs to be a couple of inches long.

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The only problem with joining bridges only a couple of inches long is actually fitting them between the modules !

 

Even the 6" gap / bridges used by the YMR OO modules were a tight squeeze to get both connected - one side is a doddle, but then when offering the 2nd module to be able to hold the bridge in the correct place took a bit of contortionistic handling.

 

Just my 2p worth.

 

Stu

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Hi all

I'm new here, but having read your ideas so far I think you are going to come unstuck with that 6" joining section. Years ago I had a modular layout in 0 gauge tinplate (yes, Hornby) and I joined the sections with small 2-3" sections of track that slotted in vertically onto brass fingers that went up the middle of the tinplate. Worked well, with the loose fit allowing for any slight inaccuracies. Now, so far your moduals are loose in relation to each other? So what if one gets knocked out of line? Shouldn't they be g-clamped together? Then take your loose section and have it (the birch ply with track attached) sit in a recess on each board as they are slid together, apply the clamp or otherwise lock them together - now that they are together. Now, like my joining piece, yours only needs to be a couple of inches long.

 

In an ideal world you're absolutely right, they would be better joined with clamps, and we may have to go down that route. However, the modules are currently being built miles apart and the original rules were designed to give maximum simplicity and flexibility, based on the work these chaps have done (very successfully I believe)

 

 

Even the 6" gap / bridges used by the YMR OO modules were a tight squeeze to get both connected - one side is a doddle, but then when offering the 2nd module to be able to hold the bridge in the correct place took a bit of contortionistic handling.

 

Hmmm, it could be fun maneuvering some of the larger modules ...

 

 

I'm toying with the idea of putting some form of support under the connecting bridges i have made, this should get over any weight problems that 'OScale' highlighted.

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Regarding the points raised about access between the modules for connecting the layout together,. I watched the CRM layout being assembled at the Middleton Railway. Their links are only about 4 inches long but the On30 loading gauge allowed the operators to get their hands between the modules through the same holes in the backscenes that the trains pass through, instead of from the sides, to line the fishplates up when putting it all together.

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"The only problem with joining bridges only a couple of inches long is actually fitting them between the modules !"

 

Yes, I can imagine, but my: "Then take your loose section and have it (the birch ply with track attached) sit in a recess on each board as they are slid together," how can that be a problem? Everything is done from above - no struggling through holes or needing a support - the modules are the support.

 

You fit the loose section (was bridge?) onto the fishplates as it snugs down into it's recess on one board and align the second end whilst sliding the second board up against the first, then apply the clamp, then move down the tables to the next pair. The only problem is chaps will get in the way as you are moving along quicker than expected!

 

Don't forget to take the loose sections and the clamps. Every board supplies two of each; that's one of each spare.

 

If I was making modules (which I am not as I have no car) I would join mine my way and the other ends your way so you could see how simple and swift my method is.

 

Have fun,

Mike.

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I've made a slight amendment to the connector plates i've built. Having added a piece of 1" timber to the ends they are a lot more stable when a heavier loco runs across them ... not that i have any heavy locos, so i improvised with a wagon and a jar of screws ... the extra wooden sections are only screwed in place, so could be removed if they prove a hinderance.

 

I'll pot some piccies when i have an update for Gough's Yard ... work has stalled as i ran out of wire and cable ties ...

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As promised some pics of the connector plates I have been working on. The black wood is left over 6mm birch ply duely painted. The wire is all 16/0.2mm to allow the safe use of a 5amp draw.

 

The only non-standard bit is the addition of the ATX cable. I have used these to electrically join the internal connections of the three boards which make up Gough's Yard. They are rated for 5amp and are a lot quicker to join than standard terminal block.

 

I have added the two blocks of 1" timber under the ends to give them better load bearing capabilities. They are only screwed on, so could be removed if they cause a problem. If two modules are at slightly different heights they may prove a hinderance.

 

post-7154-0-19928700-1311514902_thumb.jpg

 

post-7154-0-00273700-1311514918_thumb.jpg

 

I have given the connections some more thought, and whilst i can clearly see that a whitemetal o gauge loco could be pretty heavy (not to mention Heljan diesels), these connectors are only 6" long ... my Terriers only just fit on ... so most vehicles will not have 100% of their weight on the connecting pieces at any one time.

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Hi,

 

The other solution is to make a specific adaptor from your own modules to a 'standard', then you can connect up to anyone else. The black box with the computer screen on is one of these and connects my 4 UK modules to the American and Norwegian ones further along. Total length about 40 meters. DCC controlled with RR & Co and 4 power districts.

We also use a telephone exchange to talk to each other, as we don't send trains up the line, but take them from your neighbour.

 

 

Regards Dave

post-7323-0-57688400-1311699708_thumb.jpg

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That looks like a very nice piece of modelling there Dave!

 

How do you ensure all the connectors are engineered to the right standard? Do you use dowels of any sort?

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That looks like a very nice piece of modelling there Dave!

 

How do you ensure all the connectors are engineered to the right standard? Do you use dowels of any sort?

 

 

Hi Jack,

We use the standard CL dowels and bolts, the only dimension that is standard is the rail height from the floor.

post-7323-0-30611400-1311786260_thumb.jpg

As you can see I have 1 connection that is the black box and another for when the modules are set up at home in the cellar. Both use the same dowel(s) and bolt holes.

post-7323-0-30359300-1311786386_thumb.jpg

So you start with 4 modules like this...............

post-7323-0-51202900-1311786669_thumb.jpg

 

2 months of hard work gives this ( we had to be ready for the first outing)

post-7323-0-43632900-1311786724_thumb.jpg

 

Then 3 years later we have got so far, just some buildings and lots of trees and bushes to go.

post-7323-0-42461900-1311786798_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

Regards

Dave

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Cooool, thanks for posting the pictures!

 

We use the standard CL dowels and bolts, the only dimension that is standard is the rail height from the floor.

 

Maybe i'm having a blond/senior moment but ... I fully understand using the dowels for the inner joins of your modules (i've done the same), but do you use them where the black box joins to other peoples stuff? If so, how do ensure everyone has put them in the right place as they can be quite tricky to fit in a reliable manner?

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Cooool, thanks for posting the pictures!

 

 

 

Maybe i'm having a blond/senior moment but ... I fully understand using the dowels for the inner joins of your modules (i've done the same), but do you use them where the black box joins to other peoples stuff? If so, how do ensure everyone has put them in the right place as they can be quite tricky to fit in a reliable manner?

 

 

One end of the black box is made to fit the end of my module, but the other end fits to the club modules or other members or then again if we require a 'special' we just move things physically and bolt together without using the dowels and if the bolt holes don't align, we just use a pair of wood clamps.

That's why the rail height is important, the rest you can fix.

 

 

 

Regards

 

Dave

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One end of the black box is made to fit the end of my module, but the other end fits to the club modules or other members or then again if we require a 'special' we just move things physically and bolt together without using the dowels and if the bolt holes don't align, we just use a pair of wood clamps.

That's why the rail height is important, the rest you can fix.

 

Gotcha ... thanks Dave.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hi Jack.

As a new reader to this thread and trying to build a smallish terminal branch I think the idea of joining modules together very interesting. To comply, I would have to keep my access rail straight, and put a length of board at the buffer end to make it a through station.

There is just a couple of things that I think need to be worked out.

1. Would it not be better to have the modules free standing and the same height, but having screws on the legs for small adjustments? This would relieve the problem for the depth for the point motors, and of course of any differences with manufacture.

2. The bridge. The idea that has been given (photo’s) is spot on if everyone made them out of the same size timber, but, it would need a small amount of protrusion leading on to each module, about one inch. This would give an amount of rigidity to the bridge and help support the rail, I know there would be the problem of wear and tear, but as the modules would only be joined together occasionally, I don’t think it would be much of a problem.

I hope I haven’t caused a problem with this idea but after reading all the comments there seems to be a bit of confusion as to the working heights etc.

Alan

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To comply, I would have to keep my access rail straight

 

Yes, but under the current rules you would only need about an inch of straight track at the board edge.

 

and put a length of board at the buffer end to make it a through station.

 

Although a through station would be easier its your layout. If you want to build an 'end' that wouldn't be a problem.

 

1. Would it not be better to have the modules free standing and the same height, but having screws on the legs for small adjustments? This would relieve the problem for the depth for the point motors, and of course of any differences with manufacture.

 

This was considered, but the rules were used to keep everything as simple as possible (especially where my carpentry skills are concerned!). Having seen Mozzer's On30 CRM module at the Taunton meet a few years ago it seemed sensible to stick with a 'table top' type.

 

2. The bridge. The idea that has been given (photo’s) is spot on if everyone made them out of the same size timber, but, it would need a small amount of protrusion leading on to each module, about one inch. This would give an amount of rigidity to the bridge and help support the rail, I know there would be the problem of wear and tear, but as the modules would only be joined together occasionally, I don’t think it would be much of a problem.

 

I'll put my hands up an say I still don't like the idea of bridging units protruding onto boards (alla N Trak). I think it ruins the look of the scenery and any movement of the modules risks damaging the area around it. I've tested the bridges I made and they seem quite stable. The way the current bridges are designed it doesn't matter what thickness or material you make them out of as they are joined using the rail joiners.

 

I hope I haven’t caused a problem with this idea but after reading all the comments there seems to be a bit of confusion as to the working heights etc.

Alan

 

:) No problems at all, constructive comments are always welcome! I've aeperated the rules (http://www.rmweb.co....ction-standard/) away from this thread to try and avoid any confusion.

 

I must admit that having become a father this month I haven't given the modular layout much thought at all ... in fact, I only properly got my head around the forum changes last night. Once our little bundle of poo and vomit has developed a sleeping pattern I'm hoping to revisit some of this in more detail. However, do keep the suggestions coming. Have you got a thread for your layout yet?

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Jack,

Congrats on becoming a dad, if the little bundle of p&v keeps you awake you can always go and do some modelling. The answer to your question is no, there is no thread yet because there is no layout, it is still in the grey matter and waiting for me to clear enough room in the garage, but as I am getting over a hernia op I have to take it a bit steady yet. When the layout is started it is going to be Spilsby which closed completely in 1958 and is now demolished, it sat at the end of a 4 mile single track branch from Firsby on the Grimsby to Boston line. As and when I start the module I will start the thread.

Alan

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Good luck with the recovery ... take it easy in the garage!

 

Just had a look at Spilsby on "Disused Stations" - looks like an interesting project. I'll look forward to the thread.

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  • 1 year later...

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