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Have your say with Rapido


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Hello everyone.

 

Do you have a suggestion or a new product but don't have a way of approaching a manufacturer directly? Well now you can!

 

We have created a product suggestion page on our website. This gives you the opportunity to tell us your ideas for locomotives, coaches, wagons, road vehicles or anything at all!

 

The form involves a number of questions to help us understand your ideas in full and includes sections on dates the idea was used, where they operated and the (let the froth begin) liveries they carried. The form even allows for photographs to be uploaded to help illustrate your ideas.

 

These submissions are then collected and the data forwarded into our planning meetings for consideration. This is your chance to have a say and influence future plans.

 

We wont be able to respond to every submission but we do take our customers thoughts and ideas seriously - this really is your chance to pass your thoughts straight to the people involved.

 

We have already had some great submissions - why not add yours?

 

The page can be found at:

 

www.rapidotrains.co.uk/product-suggestion

 

Happy modelling!

 

Andy

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, GRUNFOS said:

Could they do a class 120 dmu for a similar price to the class 13?

I dunno about the price :blink: but the Class 120 DMU must be one of the widest open goals in 4mm scale r-t-r and a DMU to Rapido coaching stock standards would be a sight to behold.  But equally I have a feeling that it might be at the wrong end of the price scale for an early entry into the British r-t-r market?  Various passenger brake vans might be a better hunting ground and the 'small engines' field still has some very suitable cases for treatment around.

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I'm curious as to what other people are suggesting - and I reckon that there's no harm in sharing our thoughts!

I've filled out the form and suggested a pre-grouping type that got post-grouping use and survived in industrial use well into the 1960s, and is now represented in preservation. Any guesses? ;)

Edited by MattA
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Done.  Suggested ICI PHV hoppers, and Italian Interfrigo Ferry Vans, both in N gauge....

Edited by Stuart A
clarity
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On 10/02/2021 at 13:51, MattA said:

I'm curious as to what other people are suggesting - and I reckon that there's no harm in sharing our thoughts!

I've filled out the form and suggested a pre-grouping type that got post-grouping use and survived in industrial use well into the 1960s, and is now represented in preservation. Any guesses? ;)

 

Yes. I can think of a couple, actually...

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Following on from Rapido's excellent UK bus models, I've made the case for the beautiful and iconic Alexander-bodied Atlanteans of North East England:

 

Preserved Newcastle Busways Leyland Atlantean AN68/Alexander  111 EJR111W

 

You know it makes sense!

 

 

Edited by Pillar
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Just now, Anadin Dogwalker said:

Excellent call, Pillar. I'll take half a dozen in Greater Glasgow please

 

Do you know where else in the country these operated? I had a feeling there were similar buses elsewhere but wasn't sure of the specifics. The wider the appeal, the more likely they'll be produced. :)

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23 minutes ago, Pillar said:

 

Do you know where else in the country these operated? I had a feeling there were similar buses elsewhere but wasn't sure of the specifics. The wider the appeal, the more likely they'll be produced. :)

Many moons ago EFE did the Alexander Atlantean and Fleetlines with various headlight combinations at the front. A quick look on ebay shows quite a long list for the Atlantean and Fleetlines

Also see http://www.modelbuszone.co.uk/tmb/lists/Models_EFE.htm

 

 

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11 minutes ago, AMJ said:

Many moons ago EFE did the Alexander Atlantean and Fleetlines with various headlight combinations at the front. A quick look on ebay shows quite a long list for the Atlantean and Fleetlines

Also see http://www.modelbuszone.co.uk/tmb/lists/Models_EFE.htm

 

I haven't come across any Alexander bodied EFE models based on the later AN68 chassis, or with panormaic windows. They all seem to be earlier versions of the Atlantean. The only model I'm aware of is a kit from Marsden Models (MMK013), but it's been out of production for many years now.

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Wagon wise I think 4 wheel tanks is a big gap. LPG TTA, CO2 TTA, alumina tanks of various types over years, molasses tanks... and prob others!

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Whatever you decide, can you at least avoid the error in the latest US newsletter.

 

How many axles does a FL9 loco have?

 

As for what to make, raise the standards on the most common British loco type, the inside cylinder 0-6-0. 

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FL9 has 5 axles :)  (I saw it too...and would think of it as a proof reading error, given the model doesn't ACTUALLY have 10 axles...)

I put in for UVY and Conflat P wagons- both are notable in their absence, IMO.  Especially given that the Conflat P would match the Class 28, and Heljan didn't make one to go with it in OO, so the shrink ray or enlarger would allow for both scales at once.  

 

James

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20 minutes ago, peach james said:

FL9 has 5 axles :)  (I saw it too...and would think of it as a proof reading error, given the model doesn't ACTUALLY have 10 axles...)

I put in for UVY and Conflat P wagons- both are notable in their absence, IMO.  Especially given that the Conflat P would match the Class 28, and Heljan didn't make one to go with it in OO, so the shrink ray or enlarger would allow for both scales at once.  

 

James

The Conflat P is a good suggestion. Wasn’t the Condor hauled by Black 5s and 24s once the 28s had disgraced themselves? That would make the Conflat P even more versatile.

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On 11/02/2021 at 23:22, cheesysmith said:

Whatever you decide, can you at least avoid the error in the latest US newsletter.

 

How many axles does a FL9 loco have?

 

As for what to make, raise the standards on the most common British loco type, the inside cylinder 0-6-0. 

I think the list is being chipped away but deffo more to go at.

 

I would favour an ex Midland Railway 2F in BR condition as well as an ex LNWR Cauliflower in late LMS condition. A little more exotic would be the ex Midland railway 0-6-4 "flatiron".  Most though I would like an LNWR 5'6" radial tank in BR condition along with a pair of motor train coaches. . 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Class 323 was my suggestion. A gap in the EMU market that seems to be overlooked by various companies and one that is definitely associated with some of the more interesting areas to consider modelling post introduction! I know i'd have at least 4 sets in OO in various midlands based guises.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hornby have just produced the A2/2 and A2/3. You may want to consider the A2/1. 

The East Coast Main Line also-ran more articulated sets of coaches. Running in very prestigious trains. Coronation, West Riding etc... Vehicles that lasted from the 30s to 60s. There would be a real wow factor to these trains as they were very distinctive. Models of said vehicles would I think be  sensational.

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