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Little things - for the layout outside the railway fence


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These last few posts have sent me out to have a look at things I have seen nearly every day for years and never really looked at before!

Strung across the driveway to my office, attached to the house next door.  Junction box, Power cables, telephone cables and an external duct for the power supply to the (ex) outside loo in the lean to at the bottom right.

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A power cable and telephone wire on the house next door:

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The first one is a bit too low-res to work out exactly whats going o I do like that lovely old ironclad termination box though,, but the second looks like a modern, insulated cable, supported using the old terminal insulator from a previous bare-wire installation.

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer
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Posted (edited)

A few bits from a recent walk - not all fences are around fields! Some fences have been overcome by greenery. 'plants vs structures' is a group in ipernity, the photo-sharing website, to which I belong. It illustrates where plants have attached themselves to buildings. http://www.ipernity.com/group/2298362

Farm Barn - Bishopstone - 7 8 2021.jpg

plant 1 structure 0.jpg

Corrugated iron shed Bishopstone 7 8 2021.jpg

Edited by phil_sutters
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Posted (edited)

Still getting my thoughts together on hedges so a few random items today (a day late).

First, what I assume is a piece of exercise equipment. They are numerous in our local town park, though some have lost one or other “horizontal” member and I have never seen one in use. They are useful to perch on though to rest and watch the river for a while.      

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I haven’t dealt with livestock, though I have plenty of photos of sheep. But just a reminder that there are lots of creatures and birds in the countryside. Thr other day we saw a less welcome denizen, a mink, But a heron visits the river quite often, there are swan families in various places, more than enough squirrels to go around and even occasionally an otter. Other types of countryside will have different residents. This is a great white egret, which visited a few weeks ago but now seems to have moved on. Much the size of a heron.

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I spotted this recently. Such climbing rungs used to be common but they seem to have almost disappeared, presumably in case youngsters bring ladders with them and climb up them!

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Finally, I managed to photograph that heavily encumbered pole I mentioned some time ago. I am no electrical or telephone engineer, but I assume that all the boxes are junction boxes of some kind, with the cables going out to all the surrounding houses.

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A few weeks ago I posted a photo of the wall of some rather dilapidated garages on the other side or my road. It turns out that they are of some historic interest. Edited from the report by RCNM: "Glanbechan Factory Woollen Mill). This 19th c. woollen factory originally stood on the plot and burned down in 1938 leaving just the partial remains of the ground floor outer wall standing."

Perhaps hedges next time, especially if the weather doesn’t improve.

Jonathan

 

Edited by corneliuslundie
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11 hours ago, corneliuslundie said:

I spotted this recently. Such climbing rungs used to be common but they seem to have almost disappeared, presumably in case youngsters bring ladders with them and climb up them!

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A new pole appeared just around the corner a month or so back, and that has the climbing rungs on the upper end of it, so they are still being fitted.

 

Adrian

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That’s there to watch you. And, report back.

 

The boundary that isn’t quite a hedge I think might be a hedge that has been left to its own devices for about a century, and has become a shelter for cattle.

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Looking a little higher up than usual. This shop in Fife has an interesting roof. The railings were probably very smart at one time in history but the lack of maintenance has led to this sad scenario. 

 

steve

 

 

66AD6B16-EF46-403F-808A-E6438E5BDFE6.jpeg

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I would have thought that the owners of a Turkish kebab house would have liked the idea of a roof-top garden or balcony. Perhaps no time to spend there.

And Bodrum means basement. One of my five Turkish words.

Jonathan

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You don’t think it might be named in honour of the city, rather than somebody’s cellar?

 

That building could, as you say, make a really good location, but I suspect that the weather isn’t really right for it in Fife, whereas Bodrum is the hottest place I’ve ever been, absolutely furnace-like, because it is in a bowl-shaped sun-trap, surrounded by hills.

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Apart from the ‘interesting’ urban decay, someone needs to save that CTC wheel sign. Quite uncommon these days.

 

steve (One time CTC member)

 

 

D9076D4A-746E-4400-A7E3-B3DCB7C1C977.jpeg

Edited by steve1
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Hedges

First an example of a hedge, seen in spring, which was originally laid but as so often has been allowed to deteriorate.

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And a typical local hedge in early spring before regrowth has started following hedge trimming in the autumn.

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I have chosen the third photo to make the point that the hedges on the two sides of a lane are usually different. It gets even more noticeable as the year passes.

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Now what is a hedge? Well, around here most hedges contain numerous species. There are quite a few where the main constituent is field maple. But then there will be a stretch of oak, a stretch of holly, some beech, some sycamore, some hazel, occasionally a stretch which is mainly gorse, often areas of hawthorn, even stretches of lime, it goes on. But as summer passes one realises that there are also quite a lot of roses, the amount of bramble visible increases, and honeysuckle becomes evident because of the flowers. Well into the summer it becomes evident that there is quite a bit of bryony. Of course don’t forget the bindweed with its white flowers. And below the hedge on the banks there will be a changing range of flowers through the year, yellow, white, pink, occasionally blue. Grass will grow, flower, and wither. There are dozens of types of ggass, all different, some with very pink flowers. In some areas there will be ferns. In many places as time goes on bracken will become dominant, even to the point of hiding the whole hedge. Late summer brings out the “lords and ladies” with their orange-red berries.

Then come September the hedges will be trimmed and suddenly they are mostly bare branches again.

The above refers to hedges around Newtown. In other parts of the country different species will be dominant.

So if we wish to model country hedges we almost need to settle on not just the locality (and which way in which the hedge faces and whether it is on a bank or on level ground) but the week of the year. This is one reason why on my layout I went for spring before the hedges had started regrowing, though the other reason was that I wanted lambs in the fields.

Jonathan

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Hmmm ...... that makes the hedges either side of the footpath beside our back garden about 700 years old, yet it was planted about 12 years ago, and is beginning to be a problem as the various "woody species" have done a little too well!

 

I should say that the "rule" is easily thrown by deliberately diverse planting, in this particular case a conscious attempt to compensate for the loss of very old hedges when what was then a lane was diverted to allow for new housing.

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